When a PC user meets a Mac enthusiast

I travel quite a lot. Though usually I enjoy seeing the world, sitting and waiting at airports can get very tiresome.

A recent  snow storm left me particularly bored. It was late in the evening and I was waiting at Helsinki airport for my flight to Munich to finally take off. When the smiling lady at the Lufthansa check-in desk announced that the flight would be delayed for at least 2.5 hours, people  began pulling their laptops from their bags to open them. And so did I.

While my PC was booting, I looked around and realized that I was surrounded – by Macs!

Normally, I’m quite ok with my PC. It fits in my handbag and that’s what really matters. But amidst those stylish flat MacBooks and their glossy screens, I felt a little bit embarrassed by my unspectacular boxy, black laptop. And just when I thought it couldn’t get worse, I got Windows’ famous blue screen. Thank you very much, Bill Gates!

I got an understanding glance from my neighbor and we started a conversation about Apple’s steady march toward victory. Undeniably Macs are becoming more and more popular, and not only with designers and other creatives. This gentleman, for example, runs his own consultant company and has equipped his whole staff with Macs. Now he was giving me a lecture about why Macs are so much better than PCs.

After some time, we got to the point where he asked me what I do for a living. When I told him that I work for an IT security company, I knew it was my turn to give a little lecture. :) Like every other Mac user I’ve ever met, he felt he was magically safe from malware. Well… sorry, but this perception needs a little revision.

Yes, Macs are safer because cyber criminals can make so much more money with PC malware. PCs dominate our online world. But – and this goes out to all Mac users – this doesn’t mean Macs are more secure than PCs.

It’s like living in a safe neighborhood. Just because there aren’t as many thieves about doesn’t mean that your windows are any less easy to break. There is more and more malware with cryptic names that could infect your Mac… Zlob codec trojans just being one example.

Another consideration is that malware is increasingly browser-based and Mac users can be hit by phishing scams social engineering exploits just like any PC user. Just recently the criminal “Koobface” gang specifically targeted Mac users and tried to make profit. Go to Dancho Danchev’s blog if you want to know more about the technical details.

Macs’ growing popularity is so overwhelming that we decided that it’s time for our own Mac solution. Just as I recommended to my Mac enthusiast neighbor, I recommend you checking out F-Secure Mac Protection, free for six months. Register for our Beta program now.

We’d love to know if F-Secure Mac Protection found anything on your Mac.  ;-) Please leave a comment below.

Have a safe onward journey – in the online and offline world!

Sandra

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kids laptop remote working take your kids to work

How about ‘Take Your Work to Kid’ Day?

In the United States, Australia and Canada, April 23 will be Take Our Sons and Daughters to Work Day. But given our changing economy and workplace, is one day enough to improve the bonds between parent and child? Originally created to give girls a chance to "shadow" their parents in the workplaces women have so often been excluded from, Take Your Kid to Work Day, as it's often called, was expanded in 2003 to include boys as a way to help all kids see "the power and possibilities associated with a balanced work and family life." It's a nice ideal, but it isn't much of a reality, at least in many industrial countries. Americans spend an average of 1,788 hours a year at work. Most parents with full-time jobs will spend almost two-thirds of their day working and sleeping, leaving little time for anything else. Hopefully your country is a little better at balancing work/home. Finnish workers, for instance, spent 1,666 hours on average at work in 2013 that's 122 hours or 3 full weeks less than their American counterparts. Don't be jealous: German workers only averaged 1,388 hours at work in 2013. Chances are wherever you live your kids already see you at work. A 2012 survey found that 60 percent of Americans are email accessible for 13.5 hours a weekday with an extra 5 hours on the weekend. Given the extraordinary demands work makes on us, perhaps you can make a demand on your work to be a bit more flexible. Given that we're nearly always accessible, why can't parents plan around their kids' schedules and get some work done? Activities like sports, dance, karate and other arts offer parents a chance to be an active observer of their kids while getting some work done on a mobile PC or device while their children are being supervised by another adult. Given that 70 percent of millennial use their own devices for work, it's likely that younger parents already do this to some degree on their phones and tablets. But they're likely not thinking about potential data leakage that can occur, especially when using public Wi-Fi built on old technology that could expose your identity and possibly even your email. But with security and a virtual personal network -- like our Freedome VPN -- you can be about as secure in the office as you're out in the world seeing how your kids work, as they get another chance to see you. Cheers, Sandra [Image by Wesley Fryer | Flickr]        

April 21, 2015
BYOD

Why Bring your own Device (BYOD)?

Do you ever use your personal phone to make work related calls? Or send work related e-mails? Maybe you even use it to work on Google Docs, or access company files remotely? Doing these things basically means you’re implementing a BYOD policy at your work, whether they know it or not. BYOD – that’s bring your own device – isn’t really a new trend, but it is one that’s becoming more widespread. Statistics from TrackVia suggest that younger generations are embracing BYOD on a massive scale, with nearly 70% of surveyed Millennials admitting that they use their own devices and software, regardless of their employer’s policies on the matter. This is essentially pressuring employers to accept the trend, as the alternative could mean imposing security restrictions that limit how people go about their work. Consequently, Gartner predicts that 38% of businesses will stop providing employees with devices by 2016. It kind of seems like workers are enforcing the trend, and not businesses. But it’s happening because it’s so much easier to work with phones, tablets, and computers that you understand and enjoy. Work becomes easier, productivity goes up, life becomes more satisfying, etc. This might sound like an exaggeration, and maybe it is a little bit. BYOD won’t solve all of life’s problems, but it really takes advantage of the flexibility modern technology offers. And that’s what mobility should be about, and that’s what businesses are missing out on when they anchor people to a specific device. BYOD promotes a more “organic” aspect of technology in that it’s something people have already invested in and want to use, not something that’s being forced upon them. But of course, there are complications. Recent research confirms that many of these same devices have already had security issues. It’s great to enjoy the benefits of using your own phone or tablet for sending company e-mails, but what happens when things go wrong? You might be turning heads at work by getting work done faster and more efficient, but don’t expect this to continue if you happen to download some malicious software that infiltrates your company’s networks. You’re not alone if you want to use your own phone, tablet, or computer for work. And you’re not even alone if you do this without telling your boss. But there’s really no reason not to try and protect yourself first. You can use security software to reduce the risk of data breaches or malicious infections harming your employer. And there’s even a business oriented version of F-Secure's popular Freedome VPN called Freedome for Business that can actually give you additional forms of protection, and can help your company manage an entire fleet of BYOD and company-owned devices. It’s worth bringing these concerns to an employer if you find yourself using your own devices at the office. After all, statistics prove that you’re not alone in your concerns, and your employer will most likely have to address the issue sooner rather than later if they want the company to use technology wisely.  

April 17, 2015
BY