When a PC user meets a Mac enthusiast

I travel quite a lot. Though usually I enjoy seeing the world, sitting and waiting at airports can get very tiresome.

A recent  snow storm left me particularly bored. It was late in the evening and I was waiting at Helsinki airport for my flight to Munich to finally take off. When the smiling lady at the Lufthansa check-in desk announced that the flight would be delayed for at least 2.5 hours, people  began pulling their laptops from their bags to open them. And so did I.

While my PC was booting, I looked around and realized that I was surrounded – by Macs!

Normally, I’m quite ok with my PC. It fits in my handbag and that’s what really matters. But amidst those stylish flat MacBooks and their glossy screens, I felt a little bit embarrassed by my unspectacular boxy, black laptop. And just when I thought it couldn’t get worse, I got Windows’ famous blue screen. Thank you very much, Bill Gates!

I got an understanding glance from my neighbor and we started a conversation about Apple’s steady march toward victory. Undeniably Macs are becoming more and more popular, and not only with designers and other creatives. This gentleman, for example, runs his own consultant company and has equipped his whole staff with Macs. Now he was giving me a lecture about why Macs are so much better than PCs.

After some time, we got to the point where he asked me what I do for a living. When I told him that I work for an IT security company, I knew it was my turn to give a little lecture.:) Like every other Mac user I’ve ever met, he felt he was magically safe from malware. Well… sorry, but this perception needs a little revision.

Yes, Macs are safer because cyber criminals can make so much more money with PC malware. PCs dominate our online world. But – and this goes out to all Mac users – this doesn’t mean Macs are more secure than PCs.

It’s like living in a safe neighborhood. Just because there aren’t as many thieves about doesn’t mean that your windows are any less easy to break. There is more and more malware with cryptic names that could infect your Mac… Zlob codec trojans just being one example.

Another consideration is that malware is increasingly browser-based and Mac users can be hit by phishing scams social engineering exploits just like any PC user. Just recently the criminal “Koobface” gang specifically targeted Mac users and tried to make profit. Go to Dancho Danchev’s blog if you want to know more about the technical details.

Macs’ growing popularity is so overwhelming that we decided that it’s time for our own Mac solution. Just as I recommended to my Mac enthusiast neighbor, I recommend you checking out F-Secure Mac Protection, free for six months. Register for our Beta program now.

We’d love to know if F-Secure Mac Protection found anything on your Mac. 😉 Please leave a comment below.

Have a safe onward journey – in the online and offline world!

Sandra

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Why press freedom matters and how tech can help

World Press Freedom Day: Why it Matters and How Tech Can Help

Finland is home to the freest news media in the world, according to Reporters Without Borders. It's fitting, then, that the annual UNESCO World Press Freedom Day conference will be held in Helsinki this year, May 2-4. Freedom of information is a topic that's close to our heart. We were fighting for digital freedom before it was cool - yes, before Edward Snowden. A free press is foundational to a free and open society. A free press keeps leaders and authorities accountable, informs the citizenry about what's happening in their society, and gives a voice to those who wouldn't otherwise have one. Journalists shed light on issues the powers that be would much rather be left in the dark. They ask the tough questions. They tell stories that need to be told. In a nutshell, they provide all of us with the info we need to make the best decisions about our lives, our communities, our societies and our governments, as the American Press Institute puts it. That's a pretty important purpose. But it can also be a dangerous one. Journalists working on controversial stories are often subject to intimidation and harassment, and sometimes imprisonment. Sometimes doing their job means risking their lives. According to the Committee to Protect Journalists, 1189 journalists have been killed worldwide in work-related situations since 1992, when they began counting. 786 of those were murdered. Freedom of the press and digital technology are inextricably intertwined. Journalists' tools and means of communication are digital - so to protect themselves, their stories and their sources, they also need digital tools that enable them to work in privacy. Encrypted email and messaging apps. Secure, private file storage. A password manager to protect their accounts. A VPN to hide their Internet traffic and to access the content they need while they're on assignment abroad. F-Secure at World Press Freedom Day It's because press freedom and technology are so intertwined that it's our honor to participate in this year's World Press Freedom Day conference. Here's how we'll be participating in the program: Mikko Hypponen, Chief Research Officer at F-Secure, will keynote about protecting your rights. Tuesday May 3, 14:00 to 15:45 Erka Koivunen, our Cyber Security Advisor, will participate in a pop-up panel debate on digital security and freedom of speech in practice. Tuesday May 3, 15:45 – 16:15 Sean Sullivan, our Security Advisor, will be on hand to answer journalists' questions about opsec tools and tips. One of our lab researchers, Daavid, will be inspecting visitors' mobile devices for malware. We'll feature our VPN, Freedome.   Check out our Twitter feed on May 3 for livestream of Mikko's and Erka's stage time.                 Banner photo: Getty Images

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AirBNB. Uber. These are but two examples of disruptive startups that are popping up to challenge big organizations' legacy mindsets and business models. Digitalization has completely shaken the world, and companies have two options: adapt to stay in the game, or be left behind in a cloud of dust. But it's hard to turn a big ship around. That's why F-Secure's Harri Kiljander, Janne Jarvinen and Marko Komssi believe that a great way for companies to accelerate innovation is to bring the startup model in-house. They've collaborated with peers from other organizations in a new ebook, The Cookbook for Successful Internal Startups. The book is a practical guide to establishing and running an internal startup. An internal startup, they say, is a great route to cheaper innovation execution and faster time to market. 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Marko: A startup is an entity that is searching for a scalable, profitable business model. It differs from a company in that a company has already found its business model. Why do you want to encourage big companies to form internal startups? Harri: Big companies are really good at doing old things. An internal startup is great way to introduce new ways of working and to try developing and launching new and better products and services. Janne: All companies want to explore new areas, but in the established organization it's difficult to start something new. With an internal startup, you don't worry about the existing organizational structures. From a company perspective, because the startup is not embedded into the larger organization, it's easier to handle and it's easier to see whether it's producing results. It also gives employees the chance to be involved in something new. How has the internal startup model been beneficial for F-Secure products Freedome and Key? Harri: One of the key elements has been the rapid development and feedback cycle - the classic cycle of build, measure, learn. Build something, release it, gather feedback from users and markets, and then adjust your product, pricing, channels, etc. The more rapid you can make this cycle, the higher the likelihood of being able to generate success. Janne: We built Freedome and Key much faster as internal startups than we would have done in the traditional way. The global launch took place just nine months after the idea, and that's extremely fast. Marko: Freedome was incubated in strategic unit, not the business unit. It had more freedom as it was able to work independently, without being under any existing business pressure. What is the biggest advantage an internal startup has over an independent startup? Harri: The ability to access the big company resources, including free labor and expertise. 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Harri Kiljander is Director of Privacy Protection, Janne Jarvinen is Director of External R&D Collaboration, and Marko Komssi is Senior Manager, External R&D Collaboration at F-Secure.

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