Internet April Fools’ to surpass real April Fools’ for the first time in history

Cambridge University researchers are predicting that April Fools’ Day 2010 will be the first time that online pranks outnumber pranks in the so-called real world.

“We’re expecting to see 3,258,987 fake stories on the English-speaking worldwide web this April first,” Dr. Theodore Chiste. This will nearly than double the former record established on April 1, 1930, two months after the Whoopee Cushion was first released.

Dr. Chiste believes the most popular fake stories this year will involve Google, Facebook and/or Justin Bieber.

Who are we kidding?

As Paul Boutin wrote in the New York Times, “On the Internet, every day is April Fools’ Day.” The Onion has become one of the most popular sites in the world by turning fake stories into works of art.

To celebrate the Internet’s favorite holiday here three of our favorite  April Fools’ pranks:

1. The great Rickroll of 2008.
YouTube linked every video on its homepage to Rick Astley singing the most popular song of all time “Never Going to Give You Up.” The F-Secure Labs today announced our new product to protect against Rickroll, the F-Secure Rickroll Protector.

2. Sign o’ the times.
In 1980, the BBC reported that Big Ben was going digital. One in a fine tradition of BBC pranks.

3. But seriously, folks.
F-Secure introduces a new Internet security product featuring children’s story character Moomin. The best part? It was a real product released on April 1, 2005  but it was taken as a prank.

Other F-Secure Labs April Fools’ pranks include “Helsinki Lab Infected via Nintendo Wii” and “Unusual Banking Trojan Found.”

Did you have any favorite April Fools’ this year?

Cheers,
Hetta and Jason

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Safer Internet Day

What are your kids doing for Safer Internet Day?

Today is Safer Internet Day – a day to talk about what kind of place the Internet is becoming for kids, and what people can do to make it a safe place for kids and teens to enjoy. We talk a lot about various online threats on this blog. After all, we’re a cyber security company, and it’s our job to secure devices and networks to keep people protected from more than just malware. But protecting kids and protecting adults are different ballparks. Kids have different needs, and as F-Secure Researcher Mikael Albrecht has pointed out, this isn’t always recognized by software developers or device manufacturers. So how does this actually impact kids? Well, it means parents can’t count on the devices and services kids use to be completely age appropriate. Or completely safe. Social media is a perfect example. Micke has written in the past that social media is basically designed for adults, making any sort of child protection features more of an afterthought than a focus. Things like age restrictions are easy for kids to work around. So it’s not difficult for kids to hop on Facebook or Twitter and start social networking, just like their parents or older siblings. But these services aren't designed for kids to connect with adults. So where does that leave parents? Parental controls are great tools that parents can use to monitor, and to a certain extent, limit what kids can do online. But they’re not perfect. Particularly considering the popularity of mobile devices amongst kids. Regulating content on desktop browsers and mobile apps are two different things, and while there are a lot of benefits to using mobile apps instead of web browsers, it does make using special software to regulate content much more difficult. The answer to challenges like these is the less technical approach – talking to kids. There’s some great tips for parents on F-Secure’s Digital Parenting web page, with talking points, guidelines, and potential risks that parents should learn more about. That might seem like a bit of a challenge to parents. F-Secure’s Chief Research Officer Mikko Hypponen has pointed out that today’s kids have never experienced a world without the Internet. It’s as common as electricity for them. But the nice thing about this approach is that parents can do this just by spending time with kids and learning about the things they like to do online. So if you don’t know what your kids are up to this Safer Internet Day, why not enjoy the day with your kids (or niece/nephew, or even a kid you might be babysitting) by talking over what they like to do online, and how they can enjoy doing it safely.

February 9, 2016
BY 
Star_Wars_The_Force_Awakens

What was PC technology like when each new Star Wars debuted?

When George Lucas' Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope hit theaters in May 25, 1977 the vision of a world that existed a "long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away" was startlingly new. The film opens with a massive Imperial Star Destroyer chasing a rebel ship and features routine space travel and battles suggestive of both of the age of King Arthur and a high-tech future, as depicted by visual effects pioneers Industrial Light & Magic. It also features a wire-frame animation (replicated below) of the Death Star, one of the first uses of computer animation ever to make it into a motion picture. [youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lVMnwd4mZlA] Less than a month later, history was made in the personal computer industry when Apple released the Apple II on June 10, 1977. At $1,298 -- which is just over $5,000 in today's U.S. dollars -- the machine that operated using Applesoft BASIC would become one of the first microcomputers to win widespread adoption, eventually expanding personal computing beyond hobbyists by offering business applications like VisiCalc, the first computer spreadsheet program for PCs. By the time Apple phased out the II series in 1993 between 5 and 6 million units had been sold. During 1999, the year when Lucas launched his first of the prequels Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace, more than 114 million PCs were sold and the explosion of the World Wide Web had sped up widespread adoption of internet-connected computers. EverQuest -- the second massively multi-player online game after Ultima Online and the first with a 3-D engine -- was released on March 16, 1999 and within months more than two-hundred thousand players had subscribed. On May 19th, Phantom Menace hit theaters with only one scene that wasn't altered by visual effects. It was the first Star Wars film to feature fully computer generated characters including Jar Jar Binks, so maybe that wasn't a great idea. That year Apple released its its iMac computers in a variety of colors, Intel released its Pentium III and the computer virus Melissa -- the first able to spread itself through email -- became the fastest spreading malware ever and hit 250,000 PCs worldwide. The Mobile Web also debuted in Japan via the i-mode networking standard. According to the Computer History Museum Timeline of Computer History, it offered "web access, e-mail, mobile payments, streaming video, and many other features that the rest of the world won't see for nearly another decade." Free PC gave away 10,000 Compaq computers, one of many companies that offered hardware or Internet access in exchange for viewing ads. Many of these companies were bankrupt by December of that year. This is what a 1999-era Compaq running Windows 98 looks like: [youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ii51iSCnE0Q] The full trailer of Star Wars Episode VII: The Force Awakens debuted in October of 2015. [youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sGbxmsDFVnE] This follows only six months after Apple introduced its Apple Watch wearable device. The number of computers sold each year -- when you combine personal computers with smartphones and tablets -- now numbers in the billions with more than a billion devices powered by Google's Android operating system alone being sold each year. The largest PC maker in the world Lenovo sold 58 million units in 2014. The director of The Force Awakens J.J. Abrams had no input whatsoever from its creator George Lucas who sold to the franchise to Disney. But Abrams studiously sought to connect the new film to the original trilogy. He did this both by working with the writer of Episode IV: The Empire Strikes Back Lawrence Kasdan and through effects that focused on continuity with the movie's predecessors, with only a judicious use of computer generated images. [Apple II image by Narnars0]

December 18, 2015
BY 
parent and child

We need more than just age limits to protect our children in social media

The European Union is preparing a new data protection package. It is making headlines because there are plans to raise the age limit for digital consent from 13 to 16 years. This has sometimes been describes as the age limit for joining social media. To be precise, member states could choose their age limit within this range. Younger kids would need parental consent for creating an account in social media and similar networks. We can probably agree that minors’ use of the internet can be problematic. But is an age limit really the right way to go? It’s easy to think of potential problems when children and teenagers start using social media. The platforms are powerful communication tools, for good and bad. Cyberbullying. Grooming. Inappropriate content. Unwanted marketing. Getting addicted. Stealing time and attention from homework or other hobbies. And perhaps most important. Social media often becomes a sphere of freedom, a world totally insulated from the parents and their silly rules. In social media you can choose your contacts. There’s no function that enables parents to check what the kids are doing, unless they accept their parents as friends. And the parents are often on totally different services. Facebook is quickly becoming the boring place where mom and granny hangs out. Youngsters tend to be on Instagram, WhatsApp, Snapchat, Periscope or whatnot instead. But is restricting their access to social media the right thing to do? What do we achieve by requiring parental consent before they sign up? This would mean that parents, in theory, have a chance to prevent their children from being on social media. And that’s good, right? Well, this is a flawed logic in several ways. First, it’s easy to lie about your age. Social media in generic has very poor authentication mechanisms for people signing up. They are not verifying your true identity, and can’t verify your age either. Kids learn very quickly that signing up just requires some simple math. Subtract 16, or whatever, from the current year when asked for year of birth. The other problem is that parental consent requirements don’t give parents a real choice. Electronic communication is becoming a cornerstone in our way to interact with other people. It can’t be stressed enough how important it is for our children to learn the rules and skills of this new world. Preventing kids from participating in the community where all their friends are could isolate them, and potentially cause more harm than the dark side of social media. What we need isn’t age limits and parental consent. It’s better control of the content our children are dealing with and tools for parents to follow what they are doing. Social media is currently designed for adults and everyone have tools to protect their privacy. But the same tools become a problem when children join, as they also prevent parents from keeping an eye on their offspring. Parental consent becomes significant when the social media platforms start to recognize parent-child relationships. New accounts for children under a specified age could mandatorily be linked to an adult’s account. The adult would have some level of visibility into what the child is doing, but maybe not full visibility. Metadata, like whom the child is communicating with, would be a good start. Remember that children deserve s certain level of privacy too. Parents could of course still neglect their responsibilities, but they would at least have a tool if they want to keep an eye on how their kids are doing online. And then we still have the problem with the lack of age verification. All this is naturally in vain if the kids can sign up as adults. On top of that, children’s social media preferences are very volatile. They do not stay loyally on one service all the time. Having proper parent-child relationships in one service is not enough, it need to be the norm on all services. So we are still very far from a social media world that really takes parents’ and children’s needs into account. Just demanding parental consent when kids are signing up does not really do much good. It’s of course nice to see EU take some baby steps towards a safer net for our children. But this is unfortunately an area where baby steps isn’t enough. We need a couple of giant leaps as soon as possible.   Safe surfing, Micke   Image by skyseeker    

December 17, 2015
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