No, we don’t have guests, these shoes are mine

… is my default answer when new friends come to visit my home and are astonished by my shoe parade. Yes, I’m a shoe addict. I haven’t dared to count my collection, but I must own more than 60 pairs. My shoe cabinets are packed and you will find all colors, brands and styles: high-heels, pumps, sneakers, boots, tip-toes, sandals, trainers, clogs – you name it, I have it. I own 8 pairs alone of classic Chucks of different heights and colors. You may be questioning if this many pairs are really necessary? Oh yes, they are. There is a very particular use for every pair of shoes.

Source: ZU

A passion for shoes can easily ruin your Saturday if you are hunting for a certain pair which you just cannot find in the right size in the shoe shops nearby. And no doubt, the habit can get somewhat expensive. Thank goodness the Internet has become a global shopping mall that is open 24/7 so I can not only save time and my best friend’s nerves, but also get occasional good bargains.

But sometimes shopping for shoes online isn’t much fun. Just recently a batch of poisoned links ruined my shoe shopping experience. I was hunting a pair of black ZU heels and was searching the net for the best price. I typed a search term in Google. The third search result sounded promising and so I clicked on the URL. But I didn’t see any shoes, instead I got a warning:

Hey, this was my internet security in action. Well done! But I still wanted a pair of shoes. So I tried the next link and the same thing happened. I clicked the next link – again a warning. The top search results on the first page were poisoned with some malicious code. Very annoying! No shoes for me that day.

Booby-trapped websites are on the rise and what’s even worse, cyber criminals are successfully fooling users with fake anti-virus software and making them pay for useless applications. Google announced a couple of days ago that they had performed a 13 month analysis of 240 million Web pages and fake anti-virus accounted for 15 percent of the malicious software detected. There wouldn’t be as much of it if this wasn’t a lucrative business for criminals.

So be on the lookout when you go shopping online and are searching for popular items. Here are my personal tips for avoiding bad online (shoe) shopping:

  1. Switch search engines once in a while. Google is the most popular and that’s why the criminals target its search results the most.
  2. Check if your internet security solution protects against malware spread through URLs. In F-Secure Internet Security 2010 this feature is called Browsing Protection. If you don’t know what the feature is called in your internet security product, check the vendors website or ask support.
  3. If you’re not using our software or your solution doesn’t offer a URL check, you can use our Browsing Protection for free at Just type in the URL you are worried about and the tool tells you if that site is safe or not.
  4. Think before you buy. No security vendor would use a malware warning for marketing and no ticket service on this planet will sell you cheap tickets for the UEFA Champions League Final 2010 in Madrid.

Do you have shopping tips? Do you know some safety checked shopping sites you would like to share? Just drop us a comment below.

Have a great weekend and happy vappu (May 1st) to all our Finnish readers!


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F-Secure Bringing a totally new Future for the Internet to SLUSH 2015

#SLUSH15 is almost here, and F-Secure’s participating in this year’s event in a big way. There’s going to be a big #smartsecurity announcement about the Internet of Things, as well as a couple of presentations from F-Secure personnel. SLUSH, a well-known exposition for startups in the tech industry, has become a huge international event. Both SLUSH and F-Secure call Helsinki home, so it’s only natural for F-Secure to be an active participant at the annual conference. F-Secure made waves last year after the cybersecurity company hacked the venue’s bathrooms to get people talking about online privacy. Several of the company’s researchers and personnel also put in appearances at last year’s SLUSH, including cyber security expert Mikko Hypponen, and F-Secure’s Executive Vice President, Consumer Security, Samu Konttinen. [youtube] [youtube] And they’re both back this year! This year, Samu will be giving a keynote address on SLUSH’s Silver Stage. His talk is called “Your home, your rules – The internet of what ifs”, and runs from 11:45am to 12:00pm (Helsinki time) on November 11th. Samu’s enthusiasm for topics related to security and online privacy will give people valuable insights into how IoT devices are creating new security challenges, and what people can do to protect themselves. Mikko will be appearing on SLUSH’s Black Stage at 9:25am (Helsinki time) on November 12th, where he’ll deliver a talk called “The Online Arms Race”. Mikko recently did an interview about this same topic for, so you can check that out if you want a quick preview about Mikko’s thoughts on this matter. You can follow all of F-Secure’s SLUSH news by following @FSecure_Sense, @FSecure_IoT, and @FSecure on Twitter.

November 10, 2015

Advertising – to block or not to block? (Poll)

I have become pretty immune to advertising on the net. The brain develops an algorithm to locate the relevant content and filter out the junk around it. Frankly speaking, ask me about what ads there were on the page I just visited, and I have no clue. And I believe that’s true for many of us. Except that our internal ad-blockers aren’t perfect. The advertising may still affect us unconsciously. This issue has been in the headlines a lot since Apple introduced a simple way to implement ad-blocking on iPhones and iPads. Many took advantage of the opportunity and released new tools, among them the excellent F-Secure ADBLOCKER. And many media providers got upset as this development will no doubt increase the usage of ad blocking, and thus reduce advertising revenues. Some newspapers are already attempting to prevent users with ad-blockers from using their site at all. And some publishers admit that advertising has gone too far and they had it coming. So let’s take a look at the pros and cons of advertising. First the pros. Advertisers pay for your “free” stuff. It makes it possible to get a lot of excellent services and content without paying money. Instead you pay by exposing yourself to ads and letting companies profile you for targeted advertising. Some may actually find ads, especially well targeted ads, useful. They may contain special offers and campaign codes that are of true value to you. Advertising can be entertaining. And then the longer list, the cons. Advertising often disturbs your user experience. You have to locate the beef among glossy blinking ads. And you may even have to dodge pop-ups to actually see your content. Advertising may lure you to make more, often unnecessary, purchases. That’s basically the objective of advertising. Advertising often tries to trick you into opening the advertiser’s site. For example by mimicking a Next- or Download- button in the ad. Advertising may show content that is unsuitable for the viewer. Advertising can be a way to deliver malware. Ads are delivered from separate servers. A compromised ad server may show infected ads on sites with a good reputation. I.e. in places where you don’t expect to run into malware. Advertising will consume bandwidth and make pages load more slowly. This can cost you real money depending on your data plan. Advertising is the main reason to track you. Many companies attempt to profile you as accurately as possible to make targeted advertising more effective. Good targeted advertising may not be evil in itself, but misuse of the collected data is a real threat. It seems likes the cons win hands-down. But there is one argument in favor of advertisement that deserves some more attention. The publishers who take an aggressive approach against ad-blocking typically say that blocking ads is like taking a free ride. You try to benefit from free content without paying the price. And this is an argument that can’t be dismissed just like that. Remember that advertising is the engine for a significant part of the net. Imagine that 100% of the users would use 100% effective ad-blockers. What would our virtual world look like in that case? I don’t know, but it would definitively be a different world. But on the other hand, it’s easy to find sites where advertising definitively has gone overboard. So it is understandable if the advertisers receive little sympathy for their fight against ad-blocking. This is yet another question without any clear and simple answers. So let’s pass it to you, dear readers. What do you think about advertising on the web? [polldaddy poll=9139628]   [caption id="attachment_8591" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Article trying to defend advertising. The beef is there under the ad. ;)[/caption]   Safe surfing, Micke   Image: iPhone and screenshots  

October 22, 2015