The 5 Most Embarrassing Hacks Ever

What is the worst thing about being hacked?  Is it losing your data? The financial costs?  Having to spend tedious hours getting your system back to where it was?  Or is it the embarrassment?

According to Wikipedia, a hacker is someone who displays “playful cleverness.” Hackers take “the serious humorously and their humor seriously.”  And in the beginning, most hacks were done by hobbyists, intent on having some serious fun at their targets’ expense. Breaking into networks was a way to demonstrate skill, to prove it could be done. And many hackers still have a code that they live by.

However, we are now in the age of cybercrime when crackers and cyber gangs employ every possible hack, malware and scam to make much money as possible. Criminals know that our PCs facilitate in the most intimate activities in our lives. We bank, shop and flirt via our PCs, as if no one can see what we’re doing. Yet, if our system becomes compromised, every byte of our personal data is there for a criminal to use.

Crackers have rarely gotten into the business of exposing private details, unless they were trying to satisfy a personal or political vendetta. But now—as social networks increasingly entwine or real and our digital lives—criminals recognize that our private lives can be used against us. They can play with their victims’ consciences to soak money out of even the most rational computer user. This has given rise to a new generation of extortionware that is designed to threaten both our wallets and our reputations.

From the harmless to the heartless, here are the 5 most embarrassing hacks in history:

1. Bearded
If you ever received the message “You have been bearded”, you know how humiliating it can be to have your PC hit by a Trojan. In the summer of 2000, this nasty Trojan installed a vile, not-safe-for-work desktop wallpaper that once seen can never be deleted from your memory.

2. Sober.
The Sober worm didn’t do much damage to your system, but it did give all of your email contacts something to think about. Disguised as a computer security warning (as many attacks often are), Sober included a SMTP engine that sent out to every email address it could find. If the person who received the email—which often used a provocative subject line like “You have sent me a virus!”—installed the attached executable file, the attack spread and spread and spread. It was quickly disarmed up by most antivirus software, but the embarrassment still lingers.

3. You got phished.
For most of us, getting phished can result in our accounts being hijacked and our contacts being harassed. But if you’re a Facebook board member, a phishing attack can make international news. Facebook investor Jim Breyer’s 2301 Facebook friends found out that even insiders at the world’s largest social network are vulnerable. It isn’t clear whether Breyer’s account was hacked or he fell for a scam himself. What is clear is that when you use a social network, any mistake you make can affect both your friends and your reputation.

4. Hentai virus.
This virus took embarrassment to a whole new level. Users who were infected by it had their web history was published online. The victim was then instructed to pay 1,500 yen to have the history deleted. What was particularly insidious about this attack is that the criminals knew the victim probably had something to hide since the virus was hidden to a Hentai porn video game (IF YOU DON’T KNOW WHAT “HENTAI” IS, PLEASE DO NOT GOOGLE IT WHILE AT WORK). Every virus teaches a lesson, and as PC magazine said, this virus taught us all, “Don’t enter any personal information in the videogame porn that you download from Japanese torrent sites.”

5. ICPP Copyright Foundation
The F-Secure Labs is familiar with Trojans that extort users to get their own documents back. But this newly discovered Trojan played on the nearly universal fear of profound legal trouble. Infected users were told that illegal torrents had been found on their system. The choice: Pay $400 or face jail time and fines. (Of course, the real solution was to delete the Trojan using a tool like our free Online Scanner.) What was most impressive about this attack was the detail and professionalism of the design. The use of legalese and small print tapped into a latent fear of many computer users: Someday you’re going to have to pay for all that music on your iPod.

Guilt and shame are powerful motivators. But when your computer starts acting suspiciously or your software starts making demands, the smartest thing you can do is to scan your system.



CC image credit:  Perfecto Insecto

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F-Secure Bringing a totally new Future for the Internet to SLUSH 2015

#SLUSH15 is almost here, and F-Secure’s participating in this year’s event in a big way. There’s going to be a big #smartsecurity announcement about the Internet of Things, as well as a couple of presentations from F-Secure personnel. SLUSH, a well-known exposition for startups in the tech industry, has become a huge international event. Both SLUSH and F-Secure call Helsinki home, so it’s only natural for F-Secure to be an active participant at the annual conference. F-Secure made waves last year after the cybersecurity company hacked the venue’s bathrooms to get people talking about online privacy. Several of the company’s researchers and personnel also put in appearances at last year’s SLUSH, including cyber security expert Mikko Hypponen, and F-Secure’s Executive Vice President, Consumer Security, Samu Konttinen. [youtube] [youtube] And they’re both back this year! This year, Samu will be giving a keynote address on SLUSH’s Silver Stage. His talk is called “Your home, your rules – The internet of what ifs”, and runs from 11:45am to 12:00pm (Helsinki time) on November 11th. Samu’s enthusiasm for topics related to security and online privacy will give people valuable insights into how IoT devices are creating new security challenges, and what people can do to protect themselves. Mikko will be appearing on SLUSH’s Black Stage at 9:25am (Helsinki time) on November 12th, where he’ll deliver a talk called “The Online Arms Race”. Mikko recently did an interview about this same topic for, so you can check that out if you want a quick preview about Mikko’s thoughts on this matter. You can follow all of F-Secure’s SLUSH news by following @FSecure_Sense, @FSecure_IoT, and @FSecure on Twitter.

November 10, 2015
Mikko Hypponen, Leo Laporte, Triangulation

5 things Mikko Hyppönen has learned from 25 years of fighting viruses

F-Secure Chief Research Officer Mikko Hyppönen sat down on Monday for a video chat with renowned tech journalist and broadcaster Leo Laporte on Triangulation. Laporte has admired Mikko and F-Secure from afar for more than twenty years, the host explained. So this first talk gave the two IT stalwarts a chance to talk over Mikko's nearly quarter century of work at F-Secure -- which he joined as a coder in 1991 when we were still known as Data Fellows. You can watch the whole interview below or download the audio here: [youtube] The whole show is worth your time but to get ready to mark Mikko's silver anniversary at F-Secure, we thought we'd pull out some interesting lessons he's learned in more than two decades of tangling with digital threats. Driving a forklift -- Mikko's job before joining F-Secure -- has one big advantage over being an internationally known virus hunter. Once you're done with work for the day, you don't think about your job at all. Mikko told Leo that being Chief Research Officer at a company that protects hundreds of millions of computers doesn't give you that luxury. Some early malware creators went on to some very interesting things. Mikko told Leo about his trip to Pakistan to meet the two brothers who wrote the first PC virus more than 25 years ago, which you can watch below. Basit Farooq Alvi and Amjad Farooq Alvi wrote the program for what they saw as a legitimate purpose -- preventing copyright infringement. Today the brothers along with a third brother run a successful telecommunications business. Robert Tapan Morris -- the creator of Morrisworm the first computer worm -- is a member of the Computer Science faculty at MIT and a partner in Y Combinator, which helps launch tech startups.[youtube] His number one security tip? Back up your stuff. "Back up your computer, your iPad, your phone. And back it up so you can access it even if your house burns down." The numbers when it comes to malware are huge. F-Secure Labs receives about 350,000 malware samples a day, seven days a week. "The amount of new detections we build on those samples every day is usually around 10,000... 20 [thousand] on a bad day." Mobile malware isn't a big problem -- except, perhaps, in China -- because Android and iOS are very restrictive. "If you are a programmer, you cannot program on your iPad," Mikko explained. All apps that end up in the Play or App Store have to be approved by Google or Apple respectively. This model, which Mikko compares to the PlayStation and Xbox ecosystems, may be good for security, but it does have some negative consequences. "It's also a little bit sad in the sense that when you have these closed environments, it's sort of like converting the users from producers to consumers." Mikko wrapped up the interview by explaining F-Secure's principles when it comes to protecting and respecting users' data: "We try to sell our products the old-fashioned way. You pay for it with your money, not your privacy." Cheers, Sandra P.S.: For some bonus Mikko, watch a public lecture he gave this week at Estonian Information Technology College. [youtube]

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