How to keep your kids safe online this summer

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It’s a fact of life: once school is out,  kids spend more time online. You may try to schedule when they can and can’t use the PC and use solutions like Parental Control to prevent some trouble. But simply limiting access to Facebook and YouTube and the rest of the online world is a limited strategy. The fact is whether it’s on a desktop, a laptop or a smartphone, most kids—or at least, most teenagers—can get online whenever they want.

That’s why we suggest spending a few minutes explaining the risks of cybercrime and online predators to your family. Of course, your kids will probably brush you off  by repeating “I know, Mom (or Dad)” over and over, as if you’re trying to discuss the birds and the bees. So don’t go in unprepared. Check out these five quick tips to keep your kids and your PC safe until school resumes in fall.

1. Repeat the mantra “Links are not your friends”
Cybercriminals are aware that millions of people Facebook have plenty of time to kill. That’s why they’re spreading their scams with links described as “The Sexiest Video EVER” or “You’ll never believe this LOL.” When you’re bored and a link like that appears on a Facebook wall posted by a friend, it takes incredible will power not to click it. So repeat this mantra: If a link looks too good to be true, it is. Of course, this won’t always work. That’s why you should bookmark F-Secure’s free Browsing Protection. If your son or daughter feels they must click, have them check it out first. What else do they have to do? It’s summer.

2. Keep up with the updates
If you don’t keep your system software up to date, you risk inviting predators into your PC. Monthly updates for Windows, Adobe Reader, iTunes, and other applications are essential for your online safety.  F-Secure’s Health Check makes this time-consuming process easy. Run it once a month and save yourself some major headaches.

3. Tell your kids that you will handle installing software
Once you’ve run Health Check and made sure you’re protected, there’s no need for your kids to install any random software that pops up. So tell your child that it’s mom or dad’s job to install new software, no matter what pops up.  Once you’re home and had a nice summer beverage, check out the software. Google it to see if it’s a legitimate and then decide if it’s worth your hard drive space. Nothing ruins a nice summer afternoon like getting tricked into installing malware on your PC.

4. Make clear what information your kids should not share
Most kids know more about Facebook than you’d ever want to. They know how to add and erase apps or how to block this user and not that one. But they may not know what they should NOT share. Tell your kids that they should never private information—email addresses, phone numbers, home addresses—on any social network. They should also avoid posting information about their schedule, especially vacations or details about when their parents will be home or not. Your kids need to know that no matter how private their settings tell them they are, anything they post on a social network should be considered as public as the front page of a newspaper—if they know what that is.

5. Let them know that you are watching
You need to know which social networks your children are on. If you have the time and patience, it’s a good idea to start a profile on the site and become their friend or follower. It doesn’t take long, maybe five minutes per site. You can’t watch your child every minute. But if they get the sense that you could be watching, it can only help them think before they click or post.

Cheers,
Jason

CC image credit: James  Emery

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