How to Save Face: 6 Tips for Safer Facebooking

1. Know what you’re getting into
Facebook is a business. It exists to take your online activity and turn it into revenue. Facebook will always be free. But there is a cost. You’re paying by being exposed to advertising and allowing limited disclosure of your online activity.

How limited? You could sit down for a while and read Facebook’s Privacy Policy. But you’ll probably need a few hours and some black coffee.

So here’s a short version: basically everything you post, every person you friend, every group you join will be made public to your “friends”, “friends of your friends” or “everyone”—depending on your privacy settings.

To you this may be simple. You assume that everything you’ve posted could be available to the whole world. Others are still learning. People have lost their jobs as a result of things they’ve posted on Facebook. And when this happens, the newly unemployed person will usually claim that s/he thought that the post was private.

So joining a social network is a leap of faith. On a social network, not only do you have to trust the site to follow its privacy policy, but you also have to trust your friends. Will they reveal your secrets? Will they pass on bad information and scams to you?

And, more importantly, you have to trust yourself to share the right things.

On Facebook, you are exposing your private life in ways you may not even realize. 79% of companies review an applicant’s online information (which is completely illegal in Finland but acceptable in most of the world). Your financial future could depend on how well your profile and your photos and friends list represent you. So think before you post—always.

2. Secure your PC
What does 500,000,000 people on one website look like? To cybercriminals, it looks like a gigantic, unsecured goldmine.

Online gangs and scammers are working twenty-four hours a day to exploit the trust we have for our online friends. Updated Internet security is a must before you use Facebook or any social site. In addition, you have to make certain that your PC is updated with the most recent application system software, which can be time-consuming. F-Secure’s free Health Check makes that easy.

3. Use a unique, strong password
‘Password’ is not a good password. Neither is ‘123456’ or your pet’s name or your name any information that is available publicly on your Facebook profile.

Creating a strong, complex password that you can remember is the key to keeping strangers out of your account. Here’s a simple password system we recommend. You should also use different passwords for your all of your various accounts, especially your email accounts, to keep one hack from becoming a total nightmare.

For extra protection, never let browser remember your password, and lock your PC when you step away from it—especially if you’re living with young children and/or parents and/or anyone, really.

4. Filter your friends
Facebook works overtime to connect you with as many people possible. When you first join, the site combs through your email account to suggest as many people as possible. Then as you use the site it will suggest more email contacts. Email someone new and Facebook will suggest that you become friends.

Run out of contacts, you’ll see friends of friends, brands you might like, your ex.

It’s a strange social dynamic. When see the person’s picture, it feels like this person wants to be your friend. But who knows? All you can be sure of is that Facebook wants you to be friends.

So ask yourself this: Does everyone you email need to be your Facebook friend?

Some people have found that their best friends in the real world make lousy Facebook friends. There are a lot of people who can find you who may not like reconnecting with. According to a recent survey, 70% of Facebook users avoided becoming friends with their bosses.

Maybe you want to limit Facebook to your friends and family and leave professional connections to Twitter and LinkedIn. There’s no perfect formula, but it’s important to have some filter, some limit on what you share with whom. How do you say no when someone you don’t want to offend makes a friend request? Facebook makes this easy. You can just ‘ignore’ the request. That’s a nice way to frame it!

Want to stop Facebook from combing through your email contacts? You can remove your contacts by clicking here. But if you’re using a Facebook app on your phone, first you’ll have to disable the Facebook synchronization feature on your phone.

Want to stop Facebook from suggesting you as a friend to others? Go to “Privacy Settings” click on “Settings” for “Basic Directory Information”.  When you get there, set “Search for me on Facebook” to “Friends Only”.

Always remember this: If anyone solicits you directly about money, assume it’s a scam. Ignore and defriend that profile immediately. An easy way to defriend someone is to go to their profile and scroll down the left column until you find “Remove from Friends”.

5. Click carefully
The biggest dangers on Facebook are the links that appear on your wall. With one bad click, you could end up on a site that attempts to serve you malware or scam you using phishing tactics. One, bad ‘like’ and you could end up spamming all of your friends. That’s why you have to remember that links are not your friends.

The most popular Facebook scams involve gift cards and hilarious videos and diet advice. So far most attacks on the site have been more annoying than harmful. But without vigilance, you can be sure that vicious scams and malware are heading your way.

The best antidote to bad links is Internet security with browsing protection. You can double-check any link before you click it by copying it (right-click on it in Windows) and pasting it into F-Secure’s free Browsing Protection.

Prevention is your best cure. Realize the more sensational or strange or generic a link is, the more likely it is to be malicious. Again, links are not your friends. Apply the same caution you’ve learned to use when you’re checking email to checking Facebook. And just because your friend or family linked something, doesn’t mean you have to click on it.

6. Don’t rely on Facebook to protect your privacy
The whole point of Facebook is to “connect and share with the people in your life.” But there’s a point, for nearly everyone, where all the connecting and sharing can be too much—especially as your information becomes increasingly available to people who aren’t necessarily “in your life.”

So whenever you use Facebook, you have to ask yourself two things: Who do I want to see what I’m doing? And how would I feel if the whole world saw this?

There’s no technical tool to stop your friends from sharing your information. But Facebook does offer you the tools to control who sees your activity. That’s why you need to get to know your privacy settings.

Start at “Account”> “Privacy Settings”. Then click on “Settings” for “Basic Directory Information” . This is where you decide who can find you and what they’ll see when they do.

You get to decide.  How easy do you want to make it to find you on Facebook? Which is more important to you: privacy or connection.

If you’re more interested in connection, select “Everyone” for the top three settings “Search for me on Facebook”, “Send me a friend request” and “Send me a message”. Then consider making all the other settings “Friends Only”. This will encourage people to become your friend, and it gives you more power over your information.

Next you can click back to “Privacy Settings” and set how you share on Facebook.

You can go with the preset options or customize each category individually.

Your safest bet is “Friends Only.” You may want to want to open your activity to “Friends of Friends”; however, there is certain information that you should not make available to “Everyone”. This includes your birthday, your email address and IM, your phone number and address, political and religious beliefs and your family and relationships.

Why? All of this information may be public somewhere else, like a phone book, but you’re simply making too much identifiable information public in one easily accessible place. There may not be enough there for true identity theft, but you are giving a stranger enough information to pose as you online convincingly, which could be a problem if some potential employer or date is checking out your online presence.

You may also want to uncheck the box that says “Let friends of people tagged in my photos and posts see them.” This way you won’t unintentionally draw attention to an image one of your friends may not want others to see.

If you’re very interested in your privacy, you should continue and edit your Application and Website Settings.

Here you should do two things. 1) Remove any applications you aren’t using.  2) Click on “Turn off all platform applications”. Then you can select which applications you don’t ever want to show up on your wall ever again. That’s right. You can say goodbye to FarmVille forever, if you want to.

You can also turn off all platform applications, which will keep your friends from automatically sharing your information with the applications they’re using. Not a bad idea.

Next you can click on “Game and application activity”. Click “Customize” and select “Only Me” to keep all of your Game and application activity to yourself, which is a good idea if you’re friends with people (read: co-workers) who may judge how you spend your time.

After that, take a look at “Info accessible through your friends”.  Here you’ll see all the information that is available to the applications your friends decide to use. That’s right, your friends share all this information automatically with the applications they use.

Once you see that screen, you may want to go back to “Turn off all platform applications”. Why not turn it off until you have a good reason to turn it on?

Now we’re at “Instant Personalization”, which is controversial because Facebook opted all of its users into it. Of course, it warned everyone through an update to its Privacy Policy, but you probably didn’t take the time or coffee needed to figure that out.

So what does Instant Personalization do? It shares your information with three Facebook partner sites: Docs, Yelp and Pandora. Could more partners be added? Yes. Could you just opt out of one or two? Yes. Just click on Docs, Yelp or Pandora and then click on “Block Application.”

Again, unless you know you want to share information with these sites, it’s a good idea to opt out for now.

If you made it this far, you will be rewarded. We are now at, perhaps, the most important Facebook privacy setting: “Public Search”.

You probably heard how recently the information of over 100 million Facebook users was made available for download. All of that information was public before a security researcher took it and turned it into one downloadable file. Those 100 million Facebook users probably had enabled public search.

This is where get to decide if the whole world can find your Facebook profile and information. With one click, your profile could become the top result of a Google search for your name. If you want to avoid disclosure of your information to the world, you may want to start by limiting who can search for you. I recommend that you do not click the box to “Enable public search”.

So those are the tools Facebook gives you to protect your information. They’re complex, and that’s probably on purpose. Facebook is not shy about encouraging it’s users to share and share and share. That’s why you have to remember that Facebook (and your friends) can’t share anything you don’t post to the site.

So be careful not to post anything that can be used against you. This includes travel plans and itineraries,  complaints about bosses, co-workers and customers, company secrets, threats… Has anyone actually had a home robbed after posting plans on Facebook? Yes, indeed.

There are a million things you shouldn’t post. And you are the only person who can decide what you SHOULD share with Facebook and the world. So choose wisely.

Bonus tip: Use Facebook’s one true security feature
Facebook’s one true security feature is simple but powerful. Facebook will inform you anytime any new device accesses your account. That means if some PC or smartphone you’ve never used before logs into your account, Facebook will email you.

To turn this feature on, go to “Account Settings”. Then select “Account Security”.

Just click “Yes ” and then “Submit”.

Now, what do you do if you find out that someone beside you accessed your account? Change your password immediately. On the “Account Settings” page find “Password” and click “change”.

OK. That’s all I know about making Facebook safer a place for you and your friends. For ongoing tips you can follow F-Secure on Facebook. Do you have any tips to add?

More posts from this topic

DoS

What is a DoS attack really?

Ordinary people here in Finland have been confronted with yet another cybersecurity acronym lately, DoS. And this does not mean that retro-minded people are converting back to the pre-Windows operating system MS-DOS that we used in the eighties. Today DoS stands for Denial of Service. This case started on New Year’s Eve when customers of the OP-Pohjola bank experienced problems withdrawing cash from ATMs and accessing the on-line bank. The problems have now continued with varying severity for almost a week. What happens behind the scene is that someone is controlling a large number of computers. All these computers are instructed to bombard the target system with network traffic. This creates an overload situation that prevents ordinary customers from accessing the system. It’s like a massive cyber traffic jam. The involved computers are probably ordinary home computes infected with malware. Modern malware is versatile and can be used for varying purposes, like stealing your credit card number or participating in DoS-attacks like this. But what does this mean for me, the ordinary computer user? First, you are not at risk even if a system you use is the victim of a DoS-attack. The attack cannot harm your computer even if you try to access the system during the attack. Your data in the target system is usually safe too. The attack prevents people from accessing the system but the attackers don’t get access to data in the system. So inability to use the system is really the only harm for you. Well, that’s almost true. What if your computer is infected and participates in the attack? That would use your computer resources and slow down your Internet connection, not to speak about all the other dangers of having malware on your system. Keeping the device clean is a combination of common sense when surfing and opening attachments, and having a decent protection program installed. So you can participate in fighting DoS-attacks by caring for your own cyber security. But why? Who’s behind attacks like this and what’s the motive? Kids having fun and criminals extorting companies for money are probably the most common motives right now. Sometimes DoS-victims also accuse their competitors for the attack. But cases like this does always raise interesting questions about how vulnerable our cyber society is. There has been a lot of talk about cyber war. Cyber espionage is already reality, but cyber war is still sci-fi. This kind of DoS-attack does however give us a glimpse of what future cyber war might look like. We haven’t really seen any nations trying to knock out another county’s networks. But when it happens, it will probably look like this in greater scale. Computer-based services will be unavailable and even radio, TV, electricity and other critical services could be affected. So a short attack on a single bank is more like an annoyance for the customers. But a prolonged attack would already create sever problems, both for the target company and its customers. Not to talk about nation-wide attacks. Cyber war might be sci-fi today, but it is a future threat that need to be taken seriously.   Safe surfing, Micke   Image by Andreas Kaltenbrunner.  

Jan 5, 2015
BY 
New MERCEDES

In what color would you like your new Mercedes?

A new Mercedes. Nice. Or maybe an Audi R8? That would be cool. But hold it! Don’t sell your old car yet! Liking and sharing that giveaway campaign on Facebook will NOT give you a new car. Those prizes doesn’t even exist. They are just hoaxes. Internet and Facebook is full of crap, junk, rubbish, nonsense and gibberish. Nobody knows how many chain letters there are spreading some kind of unbelievable story. False celebrity news, bogus first-aid advice, phony charity campaigns and this kind of giveaways. We tend to think about these chain letters as hoaxes, pretty harmless jokes that doesn’t hurt us. But that’s not the full story. A hoax can be harmful, like the outright dangerous first aid advice that some people keep spreading. But a car giveaway is probably a harmless and safe prank, even if it’s false? No, not really. These chain letters are actually not traditional hoaxes, they are like-farming scams. There’s no free lunch, you don’t pay for Facebook with money but with your private data. The like-farming scams work in the same currency. You will not lose any money even if you like the page and share it. Instead you will participate in building a page with a lot of supporters, which is valuable and can be sold later. Needless to say, you will not get any of that money. Here’s how it works. Any business has a problem when starting on Facebook. An empty page without likes isn’t trustworthy. So the scammers set up a page containing anything that can go viral. A promise to get a luxury car works well. They just have to tell everyone to like the page and to share it as much as possible, to keep the chain reaction going and get even more likes. The scammers wait until there’s enough likes before they clean out the content, rename it and start looking for a buyer. The price is in “$ per k”, meaning dollars per 1000 likes. A page with 100 000 likes could sell for over $1000. So sharing the page can make quite a lot of money for the scammers if you have a lot of gullible friends, who in turn have a lot of gullible friends, and so on … The downside for you is that the likes stick even if the page is redesigned for some totally different purpose. Your face will be an evangelist for the page’s new owners and show up next to their brand. And you have no idea about what you will be promoting. I have friends who are anti-fur activists. You can probably imagine what one of them would feel when discovering that she likes a fur-coat designer! And finally some concrete advice. Review your list of old likes regularly. Remove everything except those things you truly like and want to support. When you encounter a giveaway post like this, check the involved brand’s main page in Facebook by searching for the brand name. You will in most cases notice that the giveaway is a totally different page that just is named similarly. That’s a strong scam indicator. Use common sense. From the above you get an idea about what likes in Facebook are worth. Does it make sense to give away luxury cars for this? Don’t participate in scams like this. It might feel tempting, but remember that your chance to win is exactly zero. Spread knowledge every time you see a scam of this kind. Comment with a link to this post or the appropriate description on Hoax-Slayer or Snopes.   Those sites are by the way fun and educating reading. I recommend spending some time there getting familiar with other types of hoaxes too. Read at least these two articles: Facebook car giveaway on Snopes and Facebook like-farming scams on Hoax-Slayer .   Safe surfing, Micke  

Dec 16, 2014
BY 
Crime Scene

Help! I lost my wallet, phone and everything! I need 1000 €!

“Sorry for the inconvenience, I'm in Limassol, Cyprus. I am here for a week and I just lost my bag containing all my important items, phone and money at the bus station. I need some help from you. Thanks” Many of you have seen these messages and some of you already know what the name of the game is. Yes, it’s another type of Internet scam, an imposter scam variant. I got this message last week from a photo club acquaintance. Or to be precise, the message was in bad Swedish from Google translate. Here’s what happened. First I got the mail. Needless to say, I never suspected that he was in trouble in Limassol. Instead I called him to check if he was aware of the scam. He was, I wasn’t the first to react. Several others had contacted him before me and some were posting warnings to his friends on Facebook. These scams start by someone breaking in to the victim’s web mail, which was Gmail in this case. This can happen because of a bad password, a phishing attack, malware in the computer or a breach in some other system. Then the scammer checks the settings and correspondence to find out what language the victim is using. The next step is to send a message like the above to all the victim’s contacts. The victim had reacted correctly and changed the Gmail password ASAP. But I wanted to verify and replied to the scam mail anyway, asking what I can do to help. One hour later I got this: “Thanks, I need to borrow about 1000 euros, will pay you back as soon as I get home. Western Union Money Transfer is the fastest option to wire funds to me. All you need to do is find the nearest Western Union shop and the money will be sent in minutes. See details needed WU transfer below. Name: (Redacted) Address: Limassol, Cyprus you must email me the reference number provided on the payment slip as soon as you make the transfer so I can receive money here. Thank you,” Now it should be obvious for everyone how this kind of scam works. Once the scammers get the reference number they just go to Western Union to cash in. Most recipients will not fall for this, but the scammers will get a nice profit if even one or two contacts send money. But wait. To pull this off, the scammers need to retain control over the mail account. They need to send the second mail and receive the reference number. How can this work if the victim had changed his password? This works by utilizing human’s inability to notice tiny details. The scammers will register a new mail account with an address that is almost identical to the victim’s. The first mail comes from the victim’s account, but directs replies to the new account. So the conversation can continue with the new account that people believe belongs to the victim. The new address may have a misspelled name or use a different separator between the first and last names. Or be in a different domain that is almost the same as the real one. The two addresses are totally different for computers, but a human need to pay close attention to notice the difference. How many of you would notice if a mail address changes from say Bill.Gates@gmail.com to BiII_Gates@mail.com? (How many differences do you notice, right answer at the end?) To be honest, I was sloppy too in this case and didn’t at first see the tiny difference. In theory it is also possible that webmail servers may leave active sessions open and let the scammers keep using the hacked account for a while after the password has been changed. I just tested this on Gmail. They close old sessions automatically pretty quickly, but it is anyway a good idea to use the security settings and manually terminate any connection the scammers may have open. I exchanged a couple of mails with this person the day after. He told that the scammers had changed the webmail user interface to Arabic, which probably is a hint about where they are from. I was just about to press send when I remembered to check the mail address. Bummer, the scammer’s address was still there so my reply would not have reached him unless I had typed the address manually. The account’s reply-to was still set to the scammer’s fake account. OK, let’s collect a checklist that helps identifying these scams. If someone asks for urgent help by mail, assume it’s a scam. These scams are a far more common than real requests for help. We are of course all ready to help friends, but are YOU really the one that the victim would contact in this situation? Are you close enough? How likely is it that you are close enough, but still had no clue he was travelling in Cyprus? Creating urgency is a very basic tool for scammers. Something must be done NOW so that people haven't got time to think or talk to others. The scammers may or may not be able to write correct English, but other languages are most likely hilarious Google-translations. Bad grammar is a strong warning sign. Requesting money using Western Union is another red flag. Wire transfer of money provides pretty much zero security for the sender, and scammers like that. Many scammers in this category try to fake an embarrassing situation and ask the recipient to not tell anyone else, to reduce the risk that someone else sees through it. These messages often state that the phone is lost to prevent the recipient from calling to check. But that is exactly what you should do anyway. Next checklist, how to deal with a situation where your account has been hijacked and used for scams. Act promptly. Change the mail account’s passwords. Check the webmail settings and especially the reply-to address. Correct any changed settings. Check for a function in the web mail that terminates open sessions from other devices. Gmail has a “Secure your account” -wizard under the account’s security settings. It’s a good idea to go through it. Inform your friends. A fast Facebook update may reach them before they see the scammer’s mail and prevent someone from falling for it. It also helps raising awareness. And finally, how to not be a victim in the first place. This is really about account security basics. Make sure you use a decent password. It’s easier to maintain good password habits with a password manager. Activate two-factor authentication on your important accounts. I think anyone’s main mail account is important enough for it. Learn to recognize phishing scams as they are a very common way to break into accounts. Maintain proper malware protection on all your devices. Spyware is a common way to steal account passwords. The last checklist is primarily about protecting your account. But that’s not the full picture. Imagine one of your friends falls for the scam and loses 1000 € when your account is hacked. It is kind of nice that someone cares that much about you, but losing money for it is not nice. Yes, the criminal scammer is naturally the primarily responsible. And yes, people who fall for the scam can to some extent blame themselves. But the one with the hacked account carries a piece of responsibility too. He or she could have avoided the whole incident with the tools described above. Caring about your account security is caring about your friends too! And last but not least. Knowledge is as usual the strongest weapon against scams. They work only as long as there are people who don’t recognize the scam pattern. Help fighting scam by spreading the word!   Safe surfing, Micke   PS. The two mail addresses above have 3 significant differences. 1. The name separator has changed from a dot to an underscore. 2. The domain name is mail.com instead of gmail.com. 3. The two lower case Ls in Bill has been replaced with capital I. Each of these changes is enough to make it a totally separate mail address.   Image by Yumi Kimura

Dec 8, 2014
BY