Do you REALLY need to know the difference between malware types?

Explaining Malware Types is Hard To Do

One of the stranger perils of being a technical writer involves being ambushed at odd moments by people demanding on-the-spot explanations of complex technical concepts.  I was out on the town one night and somehow found myself having to explain to a not-too-tech-savvy friend how to differentiate between a virus, a trojan and a worm.

After patiently listening to a lengthy, rambling answer, my friend thought it over for a minute and then asked, “So, why should I care? Why is this important to me? Do I really need to know the difference between different types of malwares?

My automatic reaction was to say, “Of course you need to!” – but to my surprise,  I couldn’t coherently express why I felt that way (though to be fair,  I was having trouble thinking clearly about anything that night).

Thinking it over in the sober light of day,  I realized that he’d actually asked a pretty good question. For most computer users, the difference between malware types is academic and irrelevant – at least,  right up until their computer gets infected. If everything’s working just fine, why in the world should they be able to distinguish between an exploit and a backdoor?

A Technical Person’s Answer

To get a expert’s opinion on this,  I relayed my friend’s question to an Analyst in our Response Lab. His reply was (and I’m paraphrasing here):

“Yes,  so that if anything happens, you’d know how the computer got infected, how to deal with the infection, and how to prevent it from spreading.”

Now, that’s the condensed version of a technical person’s answer. The real answer was actually a long, in-depth and detailed explanation covering how certain malware types had specific behaviors and particular vectors for distribution, as well as recommendations for dealing with particular types of infection.

And that there was the problem in a nutshell – it’s a lot of information to absorb. It was a thorough answer, but not an easy one to communicate to people with little interest in technicalities.  Some parts of the explanation also assumed more computer knowledge than most users would probably have or want.

Having said that, I thought the condensed version of our Analyst’s answer seemed like a helpful, ‘user-friendly’ answer. It summarizes all the main points effectively, puts it in a context most users would understand  and – this is important – it isn’t long-winded. I’ll come back to this again a little later.

Why A User Doesn’t Need To Know Malware Types

Trying to find a simple, all-encompassing answer to my friend’s question made me wonder if he really had a point and that users didn’t really need to know something as technical as malware types. So I decided to turn the question around and ask:

“Are there any cases in which ‘the average user’ doesn’t need to know the difference between malware types?”

The following four scenarios were the only ones I could think of where knowing malware types wouldn’t be helpful (if you can think of others, feel free to leave a comment). Of course,  I included some reasons why I think knowing malware types would be helpful even in these situations.

  1. I don’t do anything that might harm my computer.

    If you can honestly claim this, you’re probably what I’d call an Exemplary User: someone who diligently updates the operating system and programs, never installs programs or uses removable media without thoroughly vetting it first, doesn’t download from untrusted sources and basically, just does computer security right.

    An Exemplary User can laugh with scorn at looming malware outbreaks.  If this describes you, great! You can stop reading now. (Heck, you probably know the malware types already, anyway).

    Since the vast majority of users will never qualify for Exemplary Userhood however (myself included), the second best scenario is:

  2. MY computer can’t be infected.

    No, I’m not starting a PC versus Mac debate. What I mean is that even if malware does get onto your computer, it needs to find a suitable environment before it can have an effect. A Linux virus that somehow manages to get onto a Windows machine usually can’t do anything except blush sheepishly. Ditto for a backdoor that uses HTTP to connect to a remote site but ends up on a standalone computer without Internet acess.

    If your computer happens to be set up so that the majority of malware doesn’t target it or affect it (now you can start the PC/Mac debate), then our query becomes moot. Again, congratulations!

    Of course, most people have very little choice in the kind of operating system or programs they have on their computer, particularly business users. Even home users usually have to consider familiarity and affordability over specifically tailoring their computer to be malware resistant. To fix that, most users use antivirus protection. Which leads to reason 3:

  3. Why worry? My antivirus will remove it.

    Actually, since I work for a computer security company, I’d reeeaaally like it if more people could claim this. And hey – shameless plug – our Internet Security is doing pretty well in independent tests!

    Unfortunately, this solution isn’t 100% bulletproof, especially if you’re not an Exemplary User or are just plain unlucky.  Sometimes, the antivirus doesn’t catch the malware. Or it makes an error and the wrong file get fingered, causing all sorts of mayhem. Worse still, the antivirus turns out to be rogueware.

    In other words, the program you’re depending on to sort out all the problems….doesn’t. What then? Ah, then we move on to reason 4:

  4. Not my department. (IT/Tech Support/the computer guy) will just clean out any infection for me.

    OK, so the person fixing an infected computer should be the one with the technical knowledge, true. That person may not be the user, true. If you have someone dependable, willing and trustworthy, who can fix anything that goes wrong…can I have their number? Such a person is a godsend. Treasure him/her.

    Still, even if you’re that lucky, it’s often a great help to the actual technician if the user can pinpoint the probable cause. Knowing what type of dastardly program is screwing around with the computer gives the technician a good place to start investigating, and maybe also some idea of how to fix it.

    Or, to use an analogy, it’s the difference between driving to a workshop and telling the mechanic, “My car’s making a funny sound”, and saying, “The fan belt’s busted.”‘

And the Conclusion Is…

If you’re not in one of the 4 ‘Ideal Situations’ listed above, then it would probably be helpful for you to know the different kinds of malicious programs that can damage your computer, because…well, refer to condensed Analyst’s answer above.

Realistically though, learning about malware types, even superficially, requires investing time and energy that not every user can spare – which is why technical writers (ahem) have to find ways of communicating these concepts in ways that are interesting and easily accessible for everyone. Which brings us back to the condensed Analyst’s answer. It’s short, to the point and gives just enough information without being overwhelming. And if more information is asked for, well that’s the time to start going in-depth.

Personally, I like it – but since my part of my work deals with malware types anyway, I freely admit to being biased about this. So really, the best people to evaluate how useful that answer is – You, dear reader. So how about it? Do you think the condensed Analyst’s answer is a helpful, informative reply?

——

Oh and since we’re on the topic, here are the Types F-Secure uses to classify the samples – the good, the bad and the merely suspicious. You can also find plenty of other sites with excellent information on this topic – for example, HowStuffWorks.com has great articles explaining how trojans, viruses and worms work.

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GameOver ZeuS: The Kind of Game You Don’t Want On Your Computer

Unlike Team Fortress 2 or Doom, two of the most popular PC games of all time, GameOver ZeuS is not a game you can buy online or would willingly download on to your computer. What is GameOver ZeuS? While we’ve talked about banking Trojans before, none have been as detrimental to users as the GameOver ZeuS or GOZ Trojan, which initially began infecting users in 2012. Gameover ZeuS is designed to capture banking credentials from infected computers, and make wire transfers to criminal accounts overseas. It was allegedly authored by Russian hacker Evgeniy Bogachev, who then implanted it on computers all around the world; building a network of infected machines - or bots - that his crime syndicate could control from anywhere. It’s predominately spread through spam e-mail or phishing messages. So far, it’s been estimated to scam people out of hundreds of millions of dollars and it’s only getting worse. It doesn’t stop there; Gameover ZeuS can also be modified by hackers to load different kinds of Trojans on to it. One such Trojan is a ransomware called CryptoLocker, which is a devastating malware that locks a user’s most precious files by encrypting all the files until he or she pays the hacker a ransom. In June 2014, the FBI, Europol, and the UK’s National Crime Agency announced they had been working closely with various security firms and academic researchers around the world and took action under a program dubbed “Operation Trovar.” This initiative temporarily disrupted the system that was spreading the Trojan and infecting computers, allowing a temporary pause in additional computers from being infected. However, computers that were already infected remained at risk, as they were still compromised. What’s next? The disruption of the GameOver ZeuS botnet was a great success in many ways, but it’s not over. Our security advisor, Sean Sullivan, worries that this temporary disruption was actually more dangerous than completely taking it down. “Without arresting Bogachev, Gameover ZeuS is still a huge threat and likely to evolve to become more dangerous. The hackers can just as easily program a future version of the Trojan to initiate a “self-destruct” order (like destroy every file on a computer) if the ransom isn’t paid, or if authorities try to intervene.” What can we do to protect our digital freedom? Beware of malicious spam and phishing attempts — don’t open any attachments within emails unless you are specifically expecting something. Check email attachments carefully, and make sure you don’t open any files that automatically launch, which frequently end in .exe Have an Internet security solution in place and keep it up to date Keep your Windows operating system and your Internet browser plugins updated Back up all of your personal files regularly Also, check your machines to be sure you do not carry the Gameover ZeuS Trojan. For more information on how this powerful Trojan works and how it is spread, check out this this video. [protected-iframe id="888198d18fd45eae52e6400a39fb4437-10874323-9129869" info="//www.youtube-nocookie.com/v/JhiPDbTIsqw?hl=en_US&version=3&rel=0" width="640" height="360"] Have more questions? Ask us here on the blog.  

Sep 20, 2014
Unbenannt-1

16 ways SAFE protects your devices, your family and you

In the early twenty-first century, when hackers were mostly pranksters, having security software on your PC was mostly about saving you some trouble. In 2014, international crime syndicates regularly co-opt millions of computers in order to systematically steal banking information, take identities and hold files for ransom, security isn't about convenience. It's about giving our families the freedom to live our lives online with out the threat of strangers invading our lives, hijacking our time and money. An anti-virus on one PC is a good step. But who just uses one PC now? Many of us three different devices before breakfast. That's why we created F-Secure SAFE -- it's built to protect all the devices and all of the people in your family. The latest update of SAFE is designed to make it easier to install on infected computers for a smoother overall experience. It also gives your tools to keep your devices and family safe wherever they go. Since SAFE is such a dramatic expansion of what our traditional F-Secure Internet Security does we wanted to cover 16 ways it protects you, your family and your devices. And to celebrate the new SAFE launch, we're giving away one SAFE hoodie and a free year of SAFE on our Facebook page every day for 16 days beginning on September 16. Please read the rules and enter now. Here's how SAFE protects you, your devices and your family: PCs and laptops 1. Protection against ransomware Thanks to browsing protection, F-Secure SAFE protects you against malicious software that impersonates authorities, such as Interpol or the FBI, and may block your computer, demanding ransom for unblocking it and preventing you from accessing your files until you pay. Thanks to F-Secure SAFE, all known versions of this insidious type of malware can't get on your computer. 2. Protect your home computer in the same way your office computer is protected Your office computer is protected by software that safeguards it against viruses and protects corporate data against theft by criminals. SAFE gives you the same options on your home computer. 3. Limit the time your children spend on the Internet. If you think that your children may spend too much time browsing the internet or playing online games, SAFE will let you decide for how many hours they are allowed to do it every day. You can easily define in which hours exactly they connect to the Internet. If they try to go online during unapproved times, the computer will not connect to the Internet. 4. Online banking protection your bank knows you need Do you know that most banks recommend in terms of security is using paid anti-virus software when banking online? SAFE ensures you meet these recommendations. 5. Safeguard your memories  F-Secure Safe protects the photos and videos of your children or grandchildren against falling into the wrong hands. The built-in anti-virus application and protection against as-yet-unknown threats ensure that all of the memories collected on your computer are fully protected. Your files will never be destroyed, encoded to demand payment for decoding them, or intercepted in order to be published or to gain profit from distributing them. 6. Protect your children against adult content Define which sort of content can be accessed by your children, whether you're monitoring them or not. 7. Shop online without worry Thanks to protection against spyware and browsing protection, your credit card number is invisible to criminals. Now you can relax when shopping online, booking hotels or buying air tickets. Tablets 1. Control which apps your kids can install Keep games that involve virtual violence, sex or gambling off your child's device with a simple setting. 2. Decide which sites your child can visit  Even if they use tablets in their rooms, you can be sure that they visit no websites inappropriate for their age. 3. Protect your device against malware with browsing protection. Protect yourself from phishing scams, ransomware and malicious apps that could be triggered by visiting the wrong site. 4. Keep login data and online banking passwords secure SAFE protects your tablet against spyware that steals your bank login data. Smartphones 1. Find your missing phone. Locate your lost phone and make sure no one can access your data should your device be stolen. 2. Find your child Check the location of your child’s phone from our simple web portal. 3. Avoid surprising charges Are you concerned that your children may install games than require additional payments? F-Secure Safe lets you control which software is installed on their phones. 4. Block calls and text messages from unwanted numbers Start your own "Do not call" list with this feature that allows you decide who has access to you through your phone. 5. Keep your phone malware free More than 99 percent of all mobile malware targets Android, which is the second most targeted platform in the world behind Windows. With SAFE, you have protection from increasingly complex ransomware and trojans designed to get inside your phone then your wallet. You can try F-Secure SAFE for free now. Cheers, Sandra

Sep 15, 2014
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Why your Apple Watch will probably never be infected by malware

On Tuesday Apple announced its latest iPhone models and a new piece of wearable technology some have been anxiously waiting for -- Apple Watch. TechRadar describes the latest innovation from Cupertino as "An iOS 8-friendly watch that plays nice with your iPhone." And if it works like your iPhone, you can expect that it will free of all mobile malware threats, unless you decide to "jailbreak" it. The latest F-Secure Labs Threat Report clears up one big misconception about iOS malware: It does exist, barely. In the first half of 2014, 295 new families and variants or mobile malware were discovered – 294 on Android and one on iOS.  iPhone users can face phishing scams and Wi-Fi hijacking, which is why we created our Freedome VPN, but the threat of getting a bad app on your iOS device is almost non-existent. "Unlike Android, malware on iOS have so far only been effective against jailbroken devices, making the jailbreak tools created by various hacker outfits (and which usually work by exploiting undocumented bugs in the platform) of interest to security researchers," the report explains. The iOS threat that was found earlier this year, Unflod Baby Panda, was designed to listen to outgoing SSL connections in order to steal the device’s Apple ID and password details. Apple ID and passwords have been in the news recently as they may have played a role in a series of hacks of celebrity iCloud accounts that led to the posting of dozens of private photos. Our Mikko Hypponen explained in our latest Threat Report Webinar that many users have been using these accounts for years, mostly to purchase items in the iTunes store, without realizing how much data they were actually protecting. But Unflod Baby Panda is very unlikely to have played any role in the celebrity hacks, as "jailbreaking" a device is still very rare. Few users know about the hack that gives up the protection of the "closed garden" approach of the iOS app store, which has been incredibly successful in keeping malware off the platform, especially compared to the more open Android landscape. The official Play store has seen some infiltration by bad apps, adware and spamware -- as has the iOS app store to a far lesser degree -- but the majority of Android threats come from third-party marketplaces, which is why F-Secure Labs recommends you avoid them. The vast majority of iPhone owners have never had to worry about malware -- and if the Apple Watch employs the some tight restrictions on apps, the device will likely be free of security concerns. However, having a watch with the power of a smartphone attached to your body nearly twenty-four hours a day promises to introduce privacy questions few have ever considered.    

Sep 9, 2014
BY Jason