Get Real Sweepstakes: Week #5 – Win a Nokia N8

UPDATE: This sweepstakes is now closed. The winner will be contacted and then announced via our Facebook page.

Facebook recently announced a new feature: One-time passwords sent to users via text message.

[To use this feature, go to “Account “> “Account Settings”. Under “My Account”, click “Mobile”. If you already have a mobile activated, you’re ready to go. If not, you need to “Sign up for Facebook Mobile.” Facebook will text you a code to activate your phone.  Now, whenever you need a One-time password, just text “otp” to 32665 (FBOOK).]

Does Facebook just want access to more mobile phones, as security expert Larry Zeltser has suggested? Probably.  But Facebook has looked at its user base and attempted to solve a serious security problem.

If you’ve ever taken a look at the screen on the public computers in libraries, Internet cafes and schools, you see that nearly everyone has Facebook open. And the problem with public computers is that you have no idea what has been installed on them—including a keylogger.

A keylogger can track every key you hit, possibly revealing your most intimate credentials to a cybercriminal. That’s why entering your Facebook password on an unsecured public PC is risky. And shopping or banking on an unsecured PC is like shouting your credit card number through a megaphone. You would never do that. People do things online that they would never in the real world.

So here’s this week’s question. Have you ever shopped or banked on a public computer? Yes or no will do. But we’d love to hear your story.

Read the rules and post your answer in the comments for your chance to win a brand new Nokia N8 plus F-Secure Internet Security 2011.



F-Secure Internet Security 2011

By entering the Get Real promotion you accept the Official Competition Rules and the Privacy Policy (

If you do not accept these rules, please do not enter this promotion.

1. The sponsor of this promotion is F-Secure Corporation, located at Tammasaarenkatu 7, Po. Box 24, 00181 Helsinki, Finland (“Sponsor”).
2. The promotion will begin at 6:00 PM PDT on October 17, 2010 and end at 6:00 PM PDT October 24, 2010.
3. This promotion is void where prohibited or restricted by law. No purchase is necessary to enter.
4. 3 prizes a Nokia N8 with a retail value of $549 and 2 F-Secure Internet Security licenses with a retail value of $119.98 will be given as prizes in this promotion at the close of the competition.
5. Only one (1) entry, per person per Sweepstakes will be accepted.  Each comment posted constitutes an entry. Further attempts made by the same person and entries generated by a script, computer programs, macro, programmed, robotic or other automated means will be disqualified.
6. The winner will be chosen randomly from the people who participated in the competition by commenting on the “Get Real Sweepstakes Week #5“. Sponsor will notify the winner via email. If the winner does not respond within seven (7) days, he or she will forfeit the prize and another winner will be randomly chosen. This prize is shipped to the winner within 30 days of the promotion closing date.
7. The winners are responsible for any taxes associated with receipt of the prizes. Sponsor reserves the right to substitute the prizes with other prizes of equal or greater value if the prize is not available for any reason.
8. Odds of winning the prizes depend upon the total number of eligible entries received.
9. No purchase or software download is necessary to enter or win. Purchase or software download will not increase your chances of winning.
10. To enter, visit and comment on the post. To comment you must provide your email address, which will not be made public. Entries are the property of Sponsor and will not be acknowledged or returned. Comments made be edited by F-Secure without explanation.
11. Any entrant who attempts to cheat or tamper with the Get Real Sweepstakes shall be disqualified by the Sponsor’s sole discretion.
12. The name of the winner will be announced via the F-Secure Twitter channel, F-Secure Facebook page and F-Secure’s Safe and Savvy blog once the winner has been contacted. By entering, the entrant agrees that his/her name, country and/or picture can be published at F-Secure’s aforementioned channels if he/she wins.
13. By entering, entrants agree to release and hold harmless Sponsor and all of its representatives from and against any and all costs, expenses, claims, demands, proceedings, suits, actions and/or liabilities for any injuries, death, loss or damage of any kind arising from or in connection with accidents, terrorism, theft, natural disaster, the promotion of the Get Real Sweepstakes, the distribution of any prize, entrants’ participation in and/or entry into the Get Real Sweepstakes, acceptance or use of any prize or unavailability of any prize. Prizes are provided “AS IS” without warranty of any kind from the sponsor.
14.  Employees of Sponsor and family members of such employees are not eligible to enter.


CC image by Andres Rueda.

More posts from this topic

Hillary Clinton, email scandal, phishing scam

A phishing scam may hurt Hillary Clinton’s career — could it cost you yours?

This email was one of five phishing scams found in the 6,400 pages of Hillary Clinton's emails released on Wednesday. While there's no confirmation that former First Lady fell for the scam, her political opponents are using it to attack her for the security risks of the unconventional private server she used while in office -- even though a recent report found that 1 of 7 emails received on official U.S. Defense Department servers were either spam, phishing or other malware attacks. Receiving such attacks is inevitable. Cyber criminals have long known that one the best ways to hack into something is to simply ask you for the password. This technique has long relied on the fact that most of are used to entering our credentials so if a site looks trustworthy enough, we'll just type our credentials. From there, the bad guys can use these keys to unlock our digital life. As we've become more savvy in recognizing untrustworthy emails like the one above, criminals have taken advantage of our growing desire to share information about ourselves online to pioneer a more advanced technique called "spear phishing," which usually arrives in the form of a personalized email from an person or business you have a relationship with. This sort of attack was pioneered to hack high-value targets like Clinton. The Russian-backed Dukes group used this method in its 7-year campaign against western interests and others. In our Business Insider blog, Eija offers an inside look at how the CEO of a Finnish startup was the victim of an attempted spear phishing. "However, anyone can be a target..." Eija explains. And if you work in the U.S. government your chances of being hit with a very personalized attack have greatly increased as a result of the recent hack of the Office of Personnel Management. “Every bit of my personal information is in an attacker’s hands right now,"Paul Beckman, the Department of Homeland security’s chief information security officer, said at the Billington Cybersecurity Summit in September. "They could probably craft my email that even I would be susceptible to, because they know everything about me virtually.” Beckman said he regularly sends fake phishing emails to his staff to see if they fall for them, and “you’d be surprised at how often I catch these guys.”' Getting caught results in mandatory security training. But even after two or three rounds of instruction, the same people still fall for similar scams. “Someone who fails every single phishing campaign in the world should not be holding a [top secret clearance] with the federal government,” he said. “You have clearly demonstrated that you are not responsible enough to responsibly handle that information.” Beckman said he has proposed that those who prove they cannot detect a scam be stripped of their clearance, which could limit their career possibilities or even cost them a job. If you're the CEO of a startup, you recognize that security of your business is essential to your success. But if you're just an employee, your incentives for protecting intellectual property are nowhere as strong. Criminals only need one victim to make one mistake to succeed. So what are employers to do when education just isn't good enough? How about positive reinforcement for those who successfully avoid a scam? The truth is we're all only as secure as our training and focus. Organizations need to work on the best methods for developing both. Whether it's at work or at home or in the U.S. State Department, you're likely to be faced with a phishing attempt before long. Here's basic guidance from Eija on how to avoid being hooked: Be vigilant when entering your password anywhere Enable two-factor authentication Use Google’s built-in Security Checkup and Privacy Checkup tools Periodically review forwarding and mail filter settings, Connected apps & sites, Devices and Activities, shared files Disable POP and IMAP access if you don’t need them for a desktop or mobile client Cheers, Sandra

September 29, 2015
The Dukes

“The Dukes” – Ask the Experts

Last week, F-Secure Labs published a new study that provides a detailed analysis of a hacking group called “the Dukes”. The Dukes are what’s known as an advanced persistent threat (APT) – a type of hacking campaign in which a group of attackers is able to covertly infiltrate an organization’s IT network and steal data, often over a long period of time while remaining undetected. The report provides a comprehensive analysis of the Dukes’ history, and provides evidence that security researchers and analysts say proves the various attacks discussed in the report are attributable to the Duke group. Furthermore, the new information contained in the report strengthens previous claims that the group is operating with support from the Russian government. Mikko Hypponen has said that attacker attribution is important, but it’s also complex and notoriously difficult, so the findings of the report have considerable security implications. I contacted several people familiar with the report to get some additional insights into the Dukes, the research, and what this information means to policy makers responsible for issues pertaining to national cybersecurity. Artturi Lehtiö (AL) is the F-Secure Researcher who headed the investigation and authored the report. He has published previous research on attacks that are now understood to have been executed by the Dukes. Patrik Maldre (PM) is a Junior Research Fellow at the International Center for Defense and Security, and has previously written about the Dukes, and the significance of this threat for global security. Mika Aaltola (MA) is the Program Director for the Global Security research program at the Finnish Institute for International Affairs. He published an article of his own examining how groups like the Dukes fit into the geopolitical ambitions of nations that employ them.   Q: What is the one thing that people must absolutely know about the Dukes? PM: They are using their capabilities in pursuit of Russian strategic interests, including economic and political domination in Central and Eastern Europe, as well as the Caucasus region, and a return to higher status at the international level. AL: They are a long-standing key part of Russian espionage activity in the cyber domain. MA: The geopolitical intention behind the vast majority of targets. Q: We now know the Dukes are responsible for a number of high profile attacks, and seemingly target information about politics and defense. But what kind of information might they obtain with their attacks, and why would it be valuable? AL: They might obtain information like meeting notes, memos, plans, and internal reports, not to mention email conversations. In essence, the Dukes aim to be a fly on the wall behind the closed doors of cabinets, meeting rooms, and negotiating tables. PM: The targets of the Dukes include government ministries, militaries, political think tanks, and parliaments. The information that can be gained from these organizations includes, among other things, sensitive communication among high-level officials, details of future political postures, data about strategic arms procurement plans, compromising accounts of ongoing intelligence operations, positions regarding current diplomatic negotiations, future positioning of strategic military contingents, plans for future economic investments, and internal debates about policies such as sanctions. MA: The targets are high value assets. Two things are important: data concerning the plans and decisions taken by the targeted organizations. Second, who is who in the organizations, what are the key decision-making networks, what possible weaknesses can be used and exploited, and how the organization can be used to gain access to other organizations. Q: The Dukes are typically classified as an APT. What makes the Dukes different from other APTs? MA: APT is a good term to use with the Dukes. However, there are some specific characteristics. The multi-year campaigning with relatively simple tools sets Dukes apart from e.g. Stuxnet. Also, the Dukes are used in psychological warfare. The perpetrators can even benefit from they actions becoming public as long as some deniability remains. AL: The sophistication of the Dukes does not come as much from the sophistication of their own methods as it comes from their understanding of their targets’ methods, what their targets’ weaknesses are, and how those can be exploited. PM: They are among the most capable, aggressive, and determined actors that have been publicly identified to be serving Russian strategic interests. The Dukes provide a very wide array of different capabilities that can be chosen based on the targets, objectives, and constraints of a particular operation. They appear to be acting in a brazen manner that indicates complete confidence in their immunity from law enforcement or domestic oversight by democratic bodies. Q: There are 9 distinctive Duke toolsets. Why would a single group need 9 different malware toolsets instead of just 1? AL: The Dukes attempt to use their wide arsenal of tools to stay one-step ahead of the defenders by frequently switching the toolset used. MA: They are constantly developing the tools and using them for different targets. Its an evolutionary process meant to trick different “immunity” systems. Much like drug cocktails can trick the HIV virus. PM: The different Duke toolsets provide flexibility and can be used to complement each other. For example, if various members of the Dukes are used to compromise a particular target and the infection is discovered, the incident responders may be led to believe that quarantines and remediation have been successful even though another member of the Dukes is still able to extract valuable information. Q: Many people reading this aren’t involved in geopolitics. What do you think non-policy makers can take away from this whitepaper? AL: This research aims to provide a unique window into the world of the Dukes, allowing people not traditionally involved with governmental espionage or hacking to gauge for themselves how their lives may be affected by activity like the Dukes. PM: It is important for people to understand the threats that are associated with these technological developments. The understanding of cybersecurity should grow to the point where it is on par with the wider public’s understanding of other aspects of international security, such as military strategy or nuclear non-proliferation. This knowledge is relevant for the exercise of fundamental liberties that are enjoyed in democratic societies, including freedom of speech, freedom of the press, freedom of association, as well as of basic rights such as voting in elections. MA: The geopolitical intent is clearly present in this activity. However, the developments in this realm affects other types of cyber-attacks. Same methods spread. There is cross-fertilization, as in the case of Stuxnet that was soon adapted for other purposes by other groups.   F-Secure’s Business Security Insider blog recently posted a quick breakdown on how the Dukes typically execute their attacks, and what people can do to prevent becoming a victim of the Dukes or similar threats. Check it out for some additional information about the Dukes.

September 22, 2015
The Dukes, Russian cyber attacks, ATP attacks, Russian hackers

F-Secure report details Russian cyber attacks on the U.S., NATO and others

Much of the world woke to headlines Thursday morning featuring revelations from a new F-Secure whitepaper on an advanced-persistent threat (ATP) group known as “the Dukes”. In our News from the Labs blog, Labs researcher Artturi Lehtiö wrote: We believe that the Dukes are a well-resourced, highly dedicated, and organized cyber-espionage group that has been working for the Russian government since at least 2008 to collect intelligence in support of foreign and security policy decision-making. The reports note that the targets include many entities that the Russian government isn't particularly friendly with: "The Dukes primarily target Western governments and related organizations, such as government ministries and agencies, political think tanks and governmental subcontractors. Their targets have also included the governments of members of the Commonwealth of Independent States; Asian, African, and Middle Eastern governments; organizations associated with Chechen terrorism; and Russian speakers engaged in the illicit trade of controlled substances and drugs.” The Verge's Russell Brandom walked through the evidence that led to the Labs' conclusion that the attacks are likely Russian-backed: "A Russian-language error message was found within one part of the code base, and the group operating the programs seemed to act largely within working hours on Moscow time — suggesting the group was Russian, although not necessarily aligned with the Russian government. From there, F-Secure looked at the group's targets and apparent resources. Duke's growth suggested a steady flow of resources aimed at a string of government-related targets: embassies, parliaments, and ministries of defense. Notably, the group never targeted the Russian government. Even after security firms made their activities public, the Duke group didn't change tactics, suggesting they weren't concerned about being apprehended." ArsTechnica's Sean Gallagher explicated the evidence and noted the Labs' conclusion, "Such an organization operating in Russia would most likely require state acknowledgement, if not outright support." Artturi explained to Brandom that recent attacks on White House and the State Department appear to be linked the attacks detailed in his report: "The US State Department and White House are both the type of organizations that we know the Dukes primarily target. Based on what has been reported in the news, we believe it is possible that the Dukes are also behind the recent compromises of the State Department and the White House." Jarno Limnell, a professor of cybersecurity at Finland's Aalto University,told the International Business Times' David Gilbert that he fears that if this report is true, escalation is inevitable: "Losing digital information is so important for a society's competitiveness, I think we are not far from the situation where response to cyberespionage will be physical." "It is, of course, the most recent in a long line of reports linking Russia to significant cybercrime," Gizmodo's Jamie Condliffe wrote. "How it’s stopped remains anyone’s guess." We, of course, are not so pessimistic. NBC News' Arjun Kharpal highlighted described the somewhat sophisticated social engineering used to mask the infection: "The Duke group mainly uses 'spear-phishing' to attack victims – a tactic that involves sending an email with a malicious web link. Often the group would use decoys – image files or videos – to distract a victim during the infection process and malicious activity taking place. In one instance, a video of a TV commercial showing monkeys at an office was sent." Advanced threats are most likely to target organizations that are protecting high value data. Generally, but not always, these groups, especially governments, have the resources in order to prevent easy access to hackers. In our Business Insider blog, Eija wrote: "It is clear that educating employees is one very important tool in trying to fight spear-phishing campaigns such as these. Employees exposed to threats of phishing and watering holes need to understand these risks, and to learn to recognize the most common tactics employed to distract the user. These employees also need to have the best protection against phishing and watering hole attacks, and so organizations need to make sure they’re providing security strong enough to mitigate these kinds of attacks." F-Secure Cyber Security Advisor Erka Koivunen notes that smart security can prevent many risks: Why use macro-enabled Office documents that the recipient is just expected to accept, or PDF files that include JavaScript for no obvious reason? Cutting down on these types of insecure practices would easily help minimize the attack surface available for the criminals.

September 17, 2015