How to Use the Internet Safely—Before, During and After Your Next Vacation

Before laptops and smartphones, getting away from the Internet was easy. At least, you had a choice. Now most anywhere you are, your most useful and addictive sites, apps and feeds are as close as your pocket or purse.

In a recent Facebook Question, we found that more than 83% of respondents plan to use the Internet in one way or another while on holiday. 41% will connect on their laptops while 35% will depend on their mobile devices for their digital fix.

Using your devices while away from home presents some security risks. Whether you chose to plug in, tune out or a little of both, a few precautions will help keep your data and your identity safe while you enjoy a little rest and relaxation.

Before

Backup your PC and update your system and security software
A patched and protected PC is your best defense against any online threat. But because you can’t always predict what will happen to your actual laptop or device, you should make certain your irreplaceable documents and media are all backed up and safe in cloud or at home.

Contact your credit card company to let them know if you’ll be traveling abroad
If you’ve ever been a victim of credit card fraud, you know the charges can start coming from anywhere. Thus credit card companies often block transactions that are made far away from your home. While this is for your own protection, it can hinder you when you’re in the midst of your travels. Be proactive. Let your card company know your travel plans when you’re going abroad.

Don’t post your travel plans on your public social networks
When you live online, it makes feels comfortable to share your personal lives with people you don’t know that well. If you’re a master of privacy settings or Google+ Circles, you can feel more comfortable sharing your itinerary. They key point: don’t tell anyone your travel plans who you online wouldn’t tell in real life.

During

Secure your browsing when using public Wi-Fi
If you’re connecting to a wireless network you don’t control, use a VPN. If you can’t, secure your browsing whenever possible with https connections.

Use extra precautions on public computers
You never can know for sure what sort of malware is on a public computer. Your every keystoke could be logged. When using a public computer, avoid online banking and shopping. And use one-time passwords if they are available as they are for Facebook and Google.

Watch for shoulder surfers
Keep on an eye who is watching what you type and input. And if you leave your laptop in your room, leave it in a safe when available.

After

Check the credit card you used for irregularities
Reviewing the bill of the card or cards you’ve used for travel and/or online purchases  is always a good idea. Report any questionable charges ASAP.

Backup your pictures and videos from your trip
The sooner you get your media backed up, the better the chance that you’ll be enjoying digital  memories of your trip for years into the future.

Now share your pictures with you social networks
Or don’t. Either way, you’re safely back up home with your PC and your memories intact.

Cheers,

Jason

CC image by Spree2010

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