How to start over with Google+

Will Google+ ever replace Facebook? It’s difficult to imagine. While 15 million people—including tens of thousands representing businesses—have reportedly signed up for the beta, Google+ is still some 700 million users behind Facebook.

However, it’s clear that the search giant has created a social platform with interesting features—like Circles and Hangouts—worth checking out. And for me, Google+ represents more than a Facebook clone that lets me know I have new friends whenever I log into my Gmail or Google Reader. It’s a chance to rebuild my social network using what I learned from years of using Facebook, Twitter and MySpace.

In many countries you can start your Google+ account now, by logging in here. Here’s a nice preview of what you’ll find there:

To be honest, I’m not the world’s biggest Google fan. I’ve even tried to get it out of my life. But I do recognize that there is an opportunity here to make my social interactions on the web more interesting with a little less risk. So here’s how you can start your social network over on Google+.

1. Know why you’re using a Google+.
When Nirvana’s Kurt Cobain used to complain about the burdens of fame, critics would say, “No one ever started a rock band to NOT become famous.” And no one goes on a social network to be ignored. We just want control over what kind of attention we get.

Google is a business that gives away the vast majority of its products for free. Why? The old saying goes, “If you aren’t paying, you are the product.” Google makes billions selling you to advertisers. When you search (or check your Gmail), you pay for it by experiencing ads. Search will always be the core of Google’s business. So what you share on Google+, if you allow it to be public, is likely to show up in a Google search.

Some say Google+ isn’t a vast improvement over Facebook. The same potential to share information you shouldn’t exists and soon even things like games and apps that create privacy problems on Facebook will appear on +. I agree. However, you have improved. You are get what is at stake when using a social network. You know that people have lost jobs and scholarships because of their social media presences. And in the US, your social networking history is even fair game for potential employers. Knowing all this, there are tools in Google+ that make sharing more logically and potentially safer.

If you’re at the point that you feel you still want to be social but you’re existing network doesn’t work anymore…. If you’re sick of having your information shared and being opted into new features all the time… If you just want to start over, Google+ is perfect for you.

2. Get your privacy settings right.
Are Facebook’s privacy settings purposely confusing or is there just so much going on with the site that they have to be complex? Both answers are true. Some features—like facial recognition, using your identity in ads and Instant Personalization—are, I believe, purposely hidden. Others just naturally are buried to make the site easy to use.

Google+ is still relatively simple. It will become more complex but you still can quickly get most of your privacy settings right. Here are the three most important settings.

Prevent anyone on Google+ from emailing you

As my social networks use has grown, my email has become more sacred. I use it for business and close family and friends, exclusively. Google+ as a default gives everyone on the network the right to email you.

To turn this off, go to the gear in the top right corner and select “Google+ Settings”.

Select “Profile and privacy”.

Next to Public profile information click “Edit visibility on profile”.

Under your profile image, you’ll a “Send an Email” box. Click on that.

Until, at least, you have your circles set uncheck the box next to “Allow people to email you from a link on your profile”.

Turn off email notifications

Go to the gear in the top right corner.

Click on Google+ settings.

On the left of the next screen click on “Google+”.

I recommend you uncheck every box on this screen. How will you know if you have any Google+ activity? There’s a notification box that will automatically pop up in red on the black interface bar that appears whenever you use any Google site.

Now, while you’re on this page.

Edit who can see your pictures and videos

On the bottom of the Google+ Settings screen, you’ll see “You can change the visibility of your photos and video tabs on your profile.”

Click on “photos” first.

Until you set up your Circles, you may want to turn this tab off.

When you’re done adjusting these settings, click save then go back in your browser and do the same thing for videos.

3. The most important step: Take your circles seriously.
The average Facebook user has 120 friends. They also follow over 100 groups, brands, celebrities and organization. This produces a tremendous amount of information. As a result, Facebook edits your feed to give you the updates you’re most likely to interact with.

You may be following people you haven’t talked with in years and missing updates from your mom. And you’re probably sharing everything with everyone—unless you use Lists or Groups, which are challenging. As a result, people are often sharing much more than they realize.

Google+ aims to fix that. You don’t want to share your travel plans with anyone but your family? Only Google+ that is easy if you take your Circles seriously. As you add new friends, place them in the right circles.

And as you share, only share with the Circles who you want to reach. It’s much simpler than Facebook’s Groups and just requires a little thought before each post.

More on Google+

Many people think Google+ isn’t just about competing with Facebook, it’s a social backbone for web. Regardless, these 21 Google+ Privacy Tips will put you ahead of the curve on the fastest growing social network in history.

Cheers,

Jason

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POLL: What Changes To Twitter Would You Like To See?

Little changes can make a difference. For instance, Twitter's decision to switch a star for a heart as its "Favorite" button increased use of the button by as much as 27.82 percent. And it's clear that despite Wall St. demanding that site grow faster and be easier for new users to grasp to have some hope of keeping up with competitors like Facebook and Snapchat, the site is still sweating the small stuff. Here are the four changes to the service announced this week: Replies: When replying to a Tweet, @names will no longer count toward the 140-character count. This will make having conversations on Twitter easier and more straightforward, no more penny-pinching your words to ensure they reach the whole group. Media attachments: When you add attachments like photos, GIFs, videos, polls, or Quote Tweets, that media will no longer count as characters within your Tweet. More room for words! Retweet and Quote Tweet yourself: We’ll be enabling the Retweet button on your own Tweets, so you can easily Retweet or Quote Tweet yourself when you want to share a new reflection or feel like a really good one went unnoticed. Goodbye, .@: These changes will help simplify the rules around Tweets that start with a username. New Tweets that begin with a username will reach all your followers. (That means you’ll no longer have to use the ”.@” convention, which people currently use to broadcast Tweets broadly.) If you want a reply to be seen by all your followers, you will be able to Retweet it to signal that you intend for it to be viewed more broadly. These tweaks are in line with Twitter's tradition of paying attention to how people use the site and make it easier for them to do what early adopters are already doing. That's how we got hashtags, retweet buttons and @ replies. Now you'll be able to tweet a bit longer messages, something people do now with screenshots of text, and have more public conversations, something people do now by putting a "." before someone's @username so their whole feed sees the conversation not just people who happen to follow you and the user you're conversing with. Cool. These are useful little nudges that will keep people who already love the site engaged -- even though they may have some ugly unforeseen consequences. But will they transform Twitter and spark a new wave of growth? Not likely. What would without alienating the hundreds of millions of loyal users? Tough question and we'd like to know what you think. [polldaddy poll=9429603] Cheers, Jason [Image by dominiccampbell | Flickr]

May 26, 2016
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5 Ways to ‘Uncensor’ Your Facebook Feed

Allegations that Facebook "suppressed" conservative news, first reported by Gizmodo, quickly snowballed into broader charges that Facebook "censors" viewpoints its employees doesn't like. Facebook is the first access point to the internet for hundreds of millions if not a billion people around the world. And for millennials in the U.S., it is their primary source for political news. Some have suggested that the site could actually tilt the 2016 U.S. presidential election. Hence Facebook takes these allegations and the damage they've done to Facebook's image among conservatives seriously. Users will never be able to control the "Trending" section of the site, which Facebook insists is handled objectively as possible through curators (and, apparently, a lot of help from Google). But you do have some control over your news feed, which is generated by Facebook's algorithm "Edgerank." There are things you can do to influence your feed in hopes of seeing a diverse flow of information that doesn't simply confirm your biases. Here are 5: Get rid of the noise. Go to https://www.facebook.com/friends/organize and add the people you want to get less news from to your "acquaintances" list. You'll see their posts a lot less often and -- best of all -- they'll have no idea you've demoted them. Let Facebook do less of the picking for you. On the left column of your home page, under Favorites, next to News Feed click the arrow and select "Most Recent". This won't turn off Facebook's algorithm completely, but it will make it more likely you'll see a diversity of sources in your feed. Trust someone. Find a few people you respect who have a different political leanings than you and ask them for one Facebook page to follow. Just one? That's enough. Once you like the page, Facebook will help from there by suggesting a few pages with similar leanings. Of course, you're relying on Facebook's recommendations. But if you don't trust Facebook at all, this would be a good time to delete your account. Prioritize the new blood. Click on the down arrow in the upper right corner of any Facebook page and select "News Feed Preferences" and then select "Prioritize who to see first" and then on the dropdown menu select "Pages only." Now click on those new pages you just added to your stream -- along with the other valuable news sources you think help keep you informed. 5. Teach Facebook what you like. When you see something you like, click on it, comment on it, interact with it. Facebook exists to keep you in Facebook and will reward your clicks with similar content. And if you get a post you don't like, you can tell Facebook by clicking on that subtle little down arrow, which will show you this: Yes, you're sort of "censoring" your feed. But at least it's you doing it. Cheers, Jason [Image by Turinboy | Flickr]

May 18, 2016
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How far are you ready to go to see a juicy video? [POLL]

Many of you have seen them. And some of you have no doubt been victims too. Malware spreading through social media sites, like Facebook, is definitively something you should look out for. You know those posts. You raise your eyebrows when old Aunt Sophie suddenly shares a pornographic video with all her friends. You had no idea she was into that kind of stuff! Well, she isn’t (necessary). She’s just got infected with a special kind of malware called a social bot. So what’s going on here? You might feel tempted to check what “Aunt Sophie” really shared with you. But unfortunately your computer isn’t set up properly to watch the video. It lacks some kind of video thingy that need to be installed. Luckily it is easy to fix, you just click the provided link and approve the installation. And you are ready to dive into Aunt Sophie’s stuff. Yes, you probably already figured out where this is going. The social bots are excellent examples of how technology and social tricks can work together. The actual malware is naturally the “video thingy” that people are tricked to install. To be more precise, it’s usually an extension to your browser. And it’s often masqueraded as a video codec, that is a module that understands and can show a certain video format. Once installed, these extensions run in your browser with access to your social media accounts. And your friends start to receive juicy videos from you. There are several significant social engineering tricks involved here. First you are presented with content that people want to see. Juicy things like porn or exposed celebrities always work well. But it may actually be anything, from breaking news to cute animals. The content also feels safer and more trustworthy because it seems to come from one of your friends. The final trick is to masquerade the malware as a necessary system component. Well, when you want to see the video, then nothing stops you from viewing it. Right? It’s so easy to tell people to never accept this kind of additional software. But in reality it’s harder than that. Our technological environment is very heterogeneous and there’s content that devices can’t display out of the box. So we need to install some extensions. Not to talk about the numerous video formats out there. Hand on heart, how many of you can list the video formats your computer currently supports? And which significant formats aren’t supported? A more practical piece of advice is to only approve extensions when viewing content from a reliable source. And we have learned that Facebook isn’t one. On the other hand, you might open a video on a newspaper or magazine that you frequently visit, and this triggers a request to install a module. This is usually safe because you initiated the video viewing from a service that shouldn’t have malicious intents. But what if you already are “Aunt Sophie” and people are calling about your strange posts? Good first aid is going to our On-line Scanner. That’s a quick way to check your system for malware. A more sustainable solution is our F-Secure SAFE. Ok, finally the poll. How do you react when suddenly told that you need to download and install software to view a video? Be honest, how did you deal with this before reading this blog?   [polldaddy poll=9394383]   Safe surfing, Micke   Image: Facebook.com screenshot      

April 22, 2016
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