How to start over with Google+

Will Google+ ever replace Facebook? It’s difficult to imagine. While 15 million people—including tens of thousands representing businesses—have reportedly signed up for the beta, Google+ is still some 700 million users behind Facebook.

However, it’s clear that the search giant has created a social platform with interesting features—like Circles and Hangouts—worth checking out. And for me, Google+ represents more than a Facebook clone that lets me know I have new friends whenever I log into my Gmail or Google Reader. It’s a chance to rebuild my social network using what I learned from years of using Facebook, Twitter and MySpace.

In many countries you can start your Google+ account now, by logging in here. Here’s a nice preview of what you’ll find there:

To be honest, I’m not the world’s biggest Google fan. I’ve even tried to get it out of my life. But I do recognize that there is an opportunity here to make my social interactions on the web more interesting with a little less risk. So here’s how you can start your social network over on Google+.

1. Know why you’re using a Google+.
When Nirvana’s Kurt Cobain used to complain about the burdens of fame, critics would say, “No one ever started a rock band to NOT become famous.” And no one goes on a social network to be ignored. We just want control over what kind of attention we get.

Google is a business that gives away the vast majority of its products for free. Why? The old saying goes, “If you aren’t paying, you are the product.” Google makes billions selling you to advertisers. When you search (or check your Gmail), you pay for it by experiencing ads. Search will always be the core of Google’s business. So what you share on Google+, if you allow it to be public, is likely to show up in a Google search.

Some say Google+ isn’t a vast improvement over Facebook. The same potential to share information you shouldn’t exists and soon even things like games and apps that create privacy problems on Facebook will appear on +. I agree. However, you have improved. You are get what is at stake when using a social network. You know that people have lost jobs and scholarships because of their social media presences. And in the US, your social networking history is even fair game for potential employers. Knowing all this, there are tools in Google+ that make sharing more logically and potentially safer.

If you’re at the point that you feel you still want to be social but you’re existing network doesn’t work anymore…. If you’re sick of having your information shared and being opted into new features all the time… If you just want to start over, Google+ is perfect for you.

2. Get your privacy settings right.
Are Facebook’s privacy settings purposely confusing or is there just so much going on with the site that they have to be complex? Both answers are true. Some features—like facial recognition, using your identity in ads and Instant Personalization—are, I believe, purposely hidden. Others just naturally are buried to make the site easy to use.

Google+ is still relatively simple. It will become more complex but you still can quickly get most of your privacy settings right. Here are the three most important settings.

Prevent anyone on Google+ from emailing you

As my social networks use has grown, my email has become more sacred. I use it for business and close family and friends, exclusively. Google+ as a default gives everyone on the network the right to email you.

To turn this off, go to the gear in the top right corner and select “Google+ Settings”.

Select “Profile and privacy”.

Next to Public profile information click “Edit visibility on profile”.

Under your profile image, you’ll a “Send an Email” box. Click on that.

Until, at least, you have your circles set uncheck the box next to “Allow people to email you from a link on your profile”.

Turn off email notifications

Go to the gear in the top right corner.

Click on Google+ settings.

On the left of the next screen click on “Google+”.

I recommend you uncheck every box on this screen. How will you know if you have any Google+ activity? There’s a notification box that will automatically pop up in red on the black interface bar that appears whenever you use any Google site.

Now, while you’re on this page.

Edit who can see your pictures and videos

On the bottom of the Google+ Settings screen, you’ll see “You can change the visibility of your photos and video tabs on your profile.”

Click on “photos” first.

Until you set up your Circles, you may want to turn this tab off.

When you’re done adjusting these settings, click save then go back in your browser and do the same thing for videos.

3. The most important step: Take your circles seriously.
The average Facebook user has 120 friends. They also follow over 100 groups, brands, celebrities and organization. This produces a tremendous amount of information. As a result, Facebook edits your feed to give you the updates you’re most likely to interact with.

You may be following people you haven’t talked with in years and missing updates from your mom. And you’re probably sharing everything with everyone—unless you use Lists or Groups, which are challenging. As a result, people are often sharing much more than they realize.

Google+ aims to fix that. You don’t want to share your travel plans with anyone but your family? Only Google+ that is easy if you take your Circles seriously. As you add new friends, place them in the right circles.

And as you share, only share with the Circles who you want to reach. It’s much simpler than Facebook’s Groups and just requires a little thought before each post.

More on Google+

Many people think Google+ isn’t just about competing with Facebook, it’s a social backbone for web. Regardless, these 21 Google+ Privacy Tips will put you ahead of the curve on the fastest growing social network in history.

Cheers,

Jason

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Facebook videos

How far are you ready to go to see a juicy video? [POLL]

Many of you have seen them. And some of you have no doubt been victims too. Malware spreading through social media sites, like Facebook, is definitively something you should look out for. You know those posts. You raise your eyebrows when old Aunt Sophie suddenly shares a pornographic video with all her friends. You had no idea she was into that kind of stuff! Well, she isn’t (necessary). She’s just got infected with a special kind of malware called a social bot. So what’s going on here? You might feel tempted to check what “Aunt Sophie” really shared with you. But unfortunately your computer isn’t set up properly to watch the video. It lacks some kind of video thingy that need to be installed. Luckily it is easy to fix, you just click the provided link and approve the installation. And you are ready to dive into Aunt Sophie’s stuff. Yes, you probably already figured out where this is going. The social bots are excellent examples of how technology and social tricks can work together. The actual malware is naturally the “video thingy” that people are tricked to install. To be more precise, it’s usually an extension to your browser. And it’s often masqueraded as a video codec, that is a module that understands and can show a certain video format. Once installed, these extensions run in your browser with access to your social media accounts. And your friends start to receive juicy videos from you. There are several significant social engineering tricks involved here. First you are presented with content that people want to see. Juicy things like porn or exposed celebrities always work well. But it may actually be anything, from breaking news to cute animals. The content also feels safer and more trustworthy because it seems to come from one of your friends. The final trick is to masquerade the malware as a necessary system component. Well, when you want to see the video, then nothing stops you from viewing it. Right? It’s so easy to tell people to never accept this kind of additional software. But in reality it’s harder than that. Our technological environment is very heterogeneous and there’s content that devices can’t display out of the box. So we need to install some extensions. Not to talk about the numerous video formats out there. Hand on heart, how many of you can list the video formats your computer currently supports? And which significant formats aren’t supported? A more practical piece of advice is to only approve extensions when viewing content from a reliable source. And we have learned that Facebook isn’t one. On the other hand, you might open a video on a newspaper or magazine that you frequently visit, and this triggers a request to install a module. This is usually safe because you initiated the video viewing from a service that shouldn’t have malicious intents. But what if you already are “Aunt Sophie” and people are calling about your strange posts? Good first aid is going to our On-line Scanner. That’s a quick way to check your system for malware. A more sustainable solution is our F-Secure SAFE. Ok, finally the poll. How do you react when suddenly told that you need to download and install software to view a video? Be honest, how did you deal with this before reading this blog?   [polldaddy poll=9394383]   Safe surfing, Micke   Image: Facebook.com screenshot      

April 22, 2016
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Safer Internet Day

What are your kids doing for Safer Internet Day?

Today is Safer Internet Day – a day to talk about what kind of place the Internet is becoming for kids, and what people can do to make it a safe place for kids and teens to enjoy. We talk a lot about various online threats on this blog. After all, we’re a cyber security company, and it’s our job to secure devices and networks to keep people protected from more than just malware. But protecting kids and protecting adults are different ballparks. Kids have different needs, and as F-Secure Researcher Mikael Albrecht has pointed out, this isn’t always recognized by software developers or device manufacturers. So how does this actually impact kids? Well, it means parents can’t count on the devices and services kids use to be completely age appropriate. Or completely safe. Social media is a perfect example. Micke has written in the past that social media is basically designed for adults, making any sort of child protection features more of an afterthought than a focus. Things like age restrictions are easy for kids to work around. So it’s not difficult for kids to hop on Facebook or Twitter and start social networking, just like their parents or older siblings. But these services aren't designed for kids to connect with adults. So where does that leave parents? Parental controls are great tools that parents can use to monitor, and to a certain extent, limit what kids can do online. But they’re not perfect. Particularly considering the popularity of mobile devices amongst kids. Regulating content on desktop browsers and mobile apps are two different things, and while there are a lot of benefits to using mobile apps instead of web browsers, it does make using special software to regulate content much more difficult. The answer to challenges like these is the less technical approach – talking to kids. There’s some great tips for parents on F-Secure’s Digital Parenting web page, with talking points, guidelines, and potential risks that parents should learn more about. That might seem like a bit of a challenge to parents. F-Secure’s Chief Research Officer Mikko Hypponen has pointed out that today’s kids have never experienced a world without the Internet. It’s as common as electricity for them. But the nice thing about this approach is that parents can do this just by spending time with kids and learning about the things they like to do online. So if you don’t know what your kids are up to this Safer Internet Day, why not enjoy the day with your kids (or niece/nephew, or even a kid you might be babysitting) by talking over what they like to do online, and how they can enjoy doing it safely.

February 9, 2016
BY 
parent and child

We need more than just age limits to protect our children in social media

The European Union is preparing a new data protection package. It is making headlines because there are plans to raise the age limit for digital consent from 13 to 16 years. This has sometimes been describes as the age limit for joining social media. To be precise, member states could choose their age limit within this range. Younger kids would need parental consent for creating an account in social media and similar networks. We can probably agree that minors’ use of the internet can be problematic. But is an age limit really the right way to go? It’s easy to think of potential problems when children and teenagers start using social media. The platforms are powerful communication tools, for good and bad. Cyberbullying. Grooming. Inappropriate content. Unwanted marketing. Getting addicted. Stealing time and attention from homework or other hobbies. And perhaps most important. Social media often becomes a sphere of freedom, a world totally insulated from the parents and their silly rules. In social media you can choose your contacts. There’s no function that enables parents to check what the kids are doing, unless they accept their parents as friends. And the parents are often on totally different services. Facebook is quickly becoming the boring place where mom and granny hangs out. Youngsters tend to be on Instagram, WhatsApp, Snapchat, Periscope or whatnot instead. But is restricting their access to social media the right thing to do? What do we achieve by requiring parental consent before they sign up? This would mean that parents, in theory, have a chance to prevent their children from being on social media. And that’s good, right? Well, this is a flawed logic in several ways. First, it’s easy to lie about your age. Social media in generic has very poor authentication mechanisms for people signing up. They are not verifying your true identity, and can’t verify your age either. Kids learn very quickly that signing up just requires some simple math. Subtract 16, or whatever, from the current year when asked for year of birth. The other problem is that parental consent requirements don’t give parents a real choice. Electronic communication is becoming a cornerstone in our way to interact with other people. It can’t be stressed enough how important it is for our children to learn the rules and skills of this new world. Preventing kids from participating in the community where all their friends are could isolate them, and potentially cause more harm than the dark side of social media. What we need isn’t age limits and parental consent. It’s better control of the content our children are dealing with and tools for parents to follow what they are doing. Social media is currently designed for adults and everyone have tools to protect their privacy. But the same tools become a problem when children join, as they also prevent parents from keeping an eye on their offspring. Parental consent becomes significant when the social media platforms start to recognize parent-child relationships. New accounts for children under a specified age could mandatorily be linked to an adult’s account. The adult would have some level of visibility into what the child is doing, but maybe not full visibility. Metadata, like whom the child is communicating with, would be a good start. Remember that children deserve s certain level of privacy too. Parents could of course still neglect their responsibilities, but they would at least have a tool if they want to keep an eye on how their kids are doing online. And then we still have the problem with the lack of age verification. All this is naturally in vain if the kids can sign up as adults. On top of that, children’s social media preferences are very volatile. They do not stay loyally on one service all the time. Having proper parent-child relationships in one service is not enough, it need to be the norm on all services. So we are still very far from a social media world that really takes parents’ and children’s needs into account. Just demanding parental consent when kids are signing up does not really do much good. It’s of course nice to see EU take some baby steps towards a safer net for our children. But this is unfortunately an area where baby steps isn’t enough. We need a couple of giant leaps as soon as possible.   Safe surfing, Micke   Image by skyseeker    

December 17, 2015
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