3 Things You Should Do Before You Get Facebook’s New Timeline

There’s one thing I can say for sure about Facebook’s new Timeline: It’s better. I’m just not sure whom it’s better for.

It’s probably better for app makers and brand pages that benefit from the credibility they get from prominent mentions in your Timeline. And it’s probably also better for people who love to use Facebook to tell the story of their lives. But is it better for you? You’ll have to decide.

The idea behind Timeline is: “Tell your life story with a new kind of profile.” Knowing that Facebook’s goal if for you to share your story with the widest possible audience, you should take a few steps to make sure you are only sharing the chapters of your life you really want to.

1. Get your friends’ settings right and audit your friends.
Whenever there are big changes on Facebook, outrage follows. Then it fades and Facebook grows. You can expect a similar cycle as Timeline rolls out. The Timeline is designed to tell your story through the content you’ve posted on Facebook. Some will find that unsettling.

The fact that Facebook built a setting that automatically makes all of your past posts “Friends Only” along with the slow roll out of Timeline indicates that Facebook is anticipating some backlash. Facebook has made the basic friend settings easy and you can now easily change the settings on any old post.

If you’re a “Friends Only” user like me, I recommend that you take advantage of the “reset button” set all of your old posts to “Friends Only”. To do this, go to the arrow in your upper right corner > Privacy Settings> Under “Limit the Audience for Past Posts” click “Manage Past Post Visibility.” If you use this setting, you can’t undo it. You can edit each post’s settings individually but you can’t change them back all at once. You can always make any post only available to you by selecting the “Custom” setting.

2. Check how you are tagged
Anyone can now tag anyone on Facebook. And if a friend tags you in something it could end up in your profile. You can always remove a tag but unless you have your settings right, a joke picture could pop up right at the moment a potential employer happens to click on your Timeline.

Go to the arrow in your upper right corner > Privacy Settings> Under “How Tags Work” click “Edit Settings.”

Here are my recommendations for tagging:


I have Timeline Review and Tag Review on for maximum Timeline control.  Timeline Review lets me approved anything tagged with my name before it shows up on my profile. Tag Review lets me approve tags on my content. I also have Maximum Timeline Visibility set to “Custom” “Only Me” for an extra layer of protection.  I don’t let Facebook recognize me in photos nor do I let friends check me into Places.

This is about as locked down as you can get. But I’ve found erring on the side of privacy has never been a problem for me on Facebook.

3. Edit your apps.
An app can write directly to your “wall”/timeline if you’ve given it permission to do so. Fact is you probably don’t remember if you’ve done so. And now apps play a more prominent role in your profile. So you should go through your approved apps and delete any that you are a) not using and b) would never like to see show up in your profile.

Go to the arrow in your upper right corner > Privacy Settings> Under “Apps & Websites” click “Edit Settings”> Under “Apps You Use” click “Edit Settings”> Click the light blue “x” next to any app you want to get rid of. Now, whenever you use an app, actually read the permissions the apps want. And it the app can write to your profile, your activity will become visible in your timeline

Extra Tip: Turn of Instant Personalization
Go to the arrow in your upper right corner > Privacy Settings> Under “Apps & Websites” click “Edit Settings”> Under “Instant Personalization” click “Edit Settings”> Uncheck the box that says “Enable instant personalization on partner websites.”

Why?
Facebook has been automatically sharing your public Facebook data with third- party partners through apps for over a year now. Now that apps will be posting to your timeline, you may end up having your activity on sites you didn’t mean to make public show up on your timeline. This is being very cautious. But it could help avoid some unintended consequences.

In Conclusion

The fact is we can’t be fully aware of the implications of Timeline until its widely implemented. When will that be?

On Quora, a, a Facebook employee speculated that it would be before the end of October. (If you’re dying to get the profile, here’s one way people have been able to get it.) The one thing you have to understand up the Facebook Timeline is that it can make your life feel way more public. More than LinkedIn, Twitter or most any other site, Facebook has the content to tell the story of our lives over the past few years.

Going forward, Facebook—I believe—hopes that you will embrace Facebook as the channel for your lifecast and mindcast in a public way. And if you do, Facebook will hit the billion-user mark before the end of 2011.

Cheers,

Jason

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Poll: What does clicking Like really mean to you?

Social media is here to stay and it definitively changes our way to communicate. One new trend is the ability to communicate instantly without writing or saying anything. Good examples are Facebook’s Like-button and the indicators for what you are doing or feeling. Facebook’s Like-button is no doubt the most popular and important feature in this category. You really can’t be a Facebook user without getting in touch with it. But the big question is what you really mean by clicking Like? It sounds simple, but may be more complex than you think. You do not only express support for the post you like, it is also a social gesture towards the poster. You show that you have read the post and want to stay in touch. Another interesting question is how to deal with good posts about bad things. We see them almost daily. Someone is writing an excellent post about something that is very wrong. You really dislike the topic of the post even if you think it’s good that someone brings it up. You agree about something you dislike. Should you click Like? Does a like target the post or the topic of a post? There’s no generic rule for this and we all act differently. More activity, likes and comments, boost a post and makes it more visible. So it would make sense to like the post as we want to spread awareness about the problem. But it still feels wrong to like something that makes you feel sick. So that’s the poll question for today. How do you act when you see a good post about something bad? Do you click Like? [polldaddy poll=8445608]   Safe surfing, Micke  

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Your digital memories – will they vanish or persist?

If you like sailing and tall ships, I can recommend this podcast about Pam Bitterman’s book Sailing to the far horizon. It’s a great story about the last years of the community-operated ship Sofia, covering both a lot of happy sailing and the ship’s sad end in the early eighties. But this is not about hippies on a ship, it’s about how we record and remember our lives. In the podcast Pam tells us how the book was made possible by her parents saving her letters home. Perhaps they had a hunch that this story will be written down one day. Going on to state that e-mails and phone calls wouldn’t have been saved that way. That’s a very interesting point that should make us think. At least it made me think about what we will remember about our lives in, say, twenty years? We collect more info about what we are doing than ever before. We shoot digital pictures all the time and post status updates on Facebook. We are telling the world where we are, what we are doing and what we feel. Maybe in a way that is shallower than letters home, but we sample our lives at a very granular rate. The real question is however how persistent this data is? If we later realize we have experienced something unique enough to write a book about, have our digital life left enough traces to support us? Pam wrote the book about Sofia some twenty years later. A twenty year old paper is still young, but that’s an eternity in the digital world. Will you still be on the same social media service? Do you still have the same account or have you lost it. Does the service even exist? And what about your e-mails, have you saved them? How are your digital photos archived? You may even have cleaned up yourself to fit everything into a cheaper cloud account. Here’s something to keep in mind about retaining your digital life. Realize the value of your personal records. You may fail to see the value in single Facebook posts, but they may still form a valuable wholeness. If you save it you can choose to use it or not in the future. If you lose it you have no choice. Make sure you don’t lose access to your mail, social media and cloud storage accounts. That would force you to start fresh, which usually means data loss. Always register a secondary mail address in the services. That will help you recover if you forget the password. Use a password manager to avoid losing the password in the first place. Redundancy is your friend. Do not store important data in a single location. The ideal strategy is to store your files both on a local computer and in a cloud account. It provides redundancy and also stores data in several geographically separated locations. This is easy with younited because you can set it to automatically back up selected folders. Mail accounts have limited capacity and you can’t keep stuff forever. Don’t delete your correspondence. Check your mail client instead for a function that archives your mail to local storage. Check your social media service for a way to download a copy of your stuff. In Facebook you can currently find this function under Settings / General. It’s good to do this regularly, and you should at least do it if you plan to close your account and go elsewhere. Migrate your data when switching to a new computer or another cloud service. It might be tricky and take some time, but it is worth it. Do not see it as a great opportunity to start fresh and get rid of "old junk". If you are somewhat serious about digital photography, you should get familiar with DAM. That means Digital Asset Management. This book is a good start. Pam did not have a book in mind when she crossed the Pacific. But she was lucky and her parents helped her retain the memories. You will not be that lucky. Don’t expect your friends on Facebook to archive posts for you, you have to do it yourself. You may not think you’ll ever need the stuff, just like Pam couldn’t see the book coming when onboard Sofia. But you never know what plans the future has for you. When you least expect it, you might find yourself in a developing adventure. Make yourself a favor and don’t lose any digital memories. Safe surfing, Micke  

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On Ello you’re not a product, you’re a feature.

Most of us have some kind of relationship with Facebook. We either love it, hate it or ignore it. Some of us are hooked. Some have found new opportunities, and many have got themselves into a mess on Facebook. Some are worry-free and totally open while others are deeply concerned about privacy. But we probably all agree that Facebook has changed our lives or at least impacted our ways to communicate. Facebook has showed that social media is an important tool for both business and private affairs. Facebook was in the right place at the right time to become the de-facto standard for social media. But the success of Facebook is also what makes it scary. Imagine the power you have if you know everything about everyone in the civilized world. And on top of that with quite loose legislation about what you can do with that data. Ok, everything and everyone are exaggerations, but not too far from the truth. Others have tried to challenge Facebook, but no one has succeeded so far. One reason is that social media automatically is monopolizing. The most important selection criteria is where your friends are, and that drives everyone into one common service. The fact that even Google failed with Google+, despite their huge resources and a ready user base from services like Gmail, just underlines how solid Facebook’s position is. Ello is the latest challenger and they certainly have an interesting approach. Ello tries to hit Facebook straight in its weakest point and provide a service that respect user integrity. They may lack the resources of Google, but they can be credible in this area. The choice between Facebook and Google is like a rock and a hard place for the privacy minded, but Ello is different. Their manifesto says it all. Will Ello survive and will they be the David that finally defeats Goliath? Ello is in a very early phase and they certainly have a very long way to go. But remember that their success depends on you too. You may not be a product on Ello, but you are certainly a feature. The main feature, actually. The team can only provide a framework for our social interactions. But people to be social with is absolutely crucial for any social network. So Ello’s raise or fall is mostly in our hands now. They need enough pioneers to make it a vibrant society. The development team can make the service fail, but they can only create potential for success. Ello needs you to materialize that potential. So what’s my honest opinion about Ello? The fact that the service is based on privacy and integrity is good. We need a social media service like this. But there are also many open questions and dark clouds on Ello’s sky. People have complained about its usability. And yes, usability is quite weird in many ways. It’s also very obvious that Ello is too premature to be a tool for non-technical users. Now in October 2014, I would personally only invite people who are used to beta software. But both usability and the technical quality can be fixed, it just takes more work from the team. A bigger question mark is however the future business model of Ello. On Facebook you’re a product and that’s what pays for the “free” service. But how is Ello going to strike a balance between privacy and funding the operation? This is one of the big challenges. Another is if the privacy-promise really is enough? Many of us are already privacy-aware, but the vast majority is still quite clueless. What Ello needs is either a big increase in privacy awareness or something clever that Facebook doesn’t provide and can’t copy quickly. It may seem futile for a small startup to challenge Facebook. But keep in mind that Facebook was small too once in the beginning. Facebook showed us that we need social media. Perhaps Ello can show us that we need social media with integrity. But anyway, you are among those who decide Ello’s future by either signing up or ignoring it.   Safe surfing, @Micke-fi on Ello   Picture: ello.co screen capture

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