5 Holiday Online Safety Tips

If you’re going mobile this holiday season, you’ll probably be still connected to the Internet in some way. Whether you’re on your phone or using someone else’s machine, you should keep in mind a few quick tips to make sure the end of your 2011 is happy and secure.

1. ‘Tis the season to change your passwords.
Especially if you haven’t yet in 2011, now is the time change the passwords of you most important accounts.  F-Secure’s Chief Research Officer Mikko Hypponen says, “Focus your password efforts to services that actually matter to you. Lousy passwords are not a sin on a site you don’t really care about.” Here’s a system we recommend to create and remember strong passwords. Also keep in mind that you want to limit the private information you share on public machines or over free Wi-Fi networks. If you must do banking or shopping from a machine or network you do not trust, use one-time passwords, if at all possible.

2. Plan ahead but don’t post ahead.
Decide which devices you need on your travels, back up your data, and hit the road. But wait till you get home to post your travel plans on social network. If you would like to make your whereabouts known to a group of people, consider email. If you must use Facebook, make sure you’re a privacy settings master. The general rule is, “Don’t tell anyone online that you’re going out of town who wouldn’t in real life.” After you return home is the best time to share your photos and memories with your social circle.

3. Take the geo-tagging data off your images.
Every few months there is a major news story about how thousands of people are sharing their location unintentionally via the pictures that they take on their mobile devices. Even if you don’t tell your social network that you’re out of town, they already may know from the metadata on the photos you share.  Here’s how to turn off geo-tagging on your phone.

4. Shop smart and monitor your credit cards.
Make sure you’re on a secure “https” site when you make any online financial transaction. Use retailers that you trust and search on their sites rather through search engines, if possible. Use one-time use credit cards if your bank offers them.  If not use the same card for all online transactions and keep an eye on your credit card account at least weekly to report any suspicious transactions.

5. If possible, put a remote lock software on your smartphone.
Smartphones often contain the keys to our online lives. If you’re out traveling celebrating, you’re much more likely to misplace it. A remote lock software like our free Anti-Theft for Mobile makes it easy to lock your phone from anywhere. It can help you locate your device and, in the worst case scenario, you can remotely wipe it and protect all your sensitive data and private images.

Nothing is more irreplaceable than the time you spend with the people you love. Hopefully these tips will help you safely create memories that last a lifetime.

Cheers,

Jason

 CC image by Beverly & Pack.

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