How to really protect your privacy on Facebook

It’s not just you. A lot of people are concerned about their privacy on Facebook. Some are worried about being tracked, even when they aren’t logged in. Some are worried about unintentionally sharing private information or opinions that can threaten their reputation or relationships. Others worry about exposing the private data on their machine through some tricky attack.

As Facebook’s new Timeline is being introduced now is the perfect time to think about how you use Facebook. We have given you 3 things to do before you activate Facebook’s new Timeline. We hope you’ll take those steps to review what you have and will be sharing and with whom. What more can you do?

You use smart passwords and have your PC patched and protected. You know, of course, the most important privacy feature on Facebook is the ‘Post’ button. If you make a point of NEVER sharing anything that you wouldn’t want your grandmother or your worst enemy to see publicly, you’re off to a good start.

 But what extra step can you take prevent invasive tracking and protect the private data on your computer?

Here’s what Sean from F-Secure Labs recommends: Do all of your social networking in a one browser. Use one browser exclusively for “public” behavior. Then use a separate browser for all of your private banking, shopping and viewing. This strategy helps you avoid worries about tracking and information bleeding between your private and public lives.

Want to be even safer? Use a dedicated machine for your social activity. This is an extremely wise strategy if you use your PC to manage your finances and or business.

An added advantage to using a ‘public’ browser or PC for your social networking is that you’ll constantly remind yourself that what you share online stays online.

So we want to know. What do you think of Facebook’s new Timeline?

Cheers,

Jason

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F-Secure employee wins Inventor of the Year

20 Patents in 14 Years: How An Award-Winning Inventor Finds His Groove

We wouldn't be F-Secure without the talented and passionate researchers in our Labs. And today we'd like you to meet one whose inquisitive nature has driven him to become an inventor - and a prolific one at that. In his 14-year career with F-Secure, Jarno Niemelä has racked up an impressive 20 patents to his name and has filed 100 patent applications in total. His achievements recently won the title of "Salaried Inventor of 2014" from a group of Finnish inventors' organizations. I sat down to chat with Jarno about where he gets his ideas, and his advice for others. What area do your inventions focus on? I mostly focus on methods to help detect malware on a system, or methods of preventing malware from entering the system in the first place. How do your ideas come about? Inventions mostly happen in the evening when I'm not at work, and not even trying to think about it. I'll be working on some problem at work, and usually a day or two later, when I'm doing something totally unrelated on my own time, it hits me. I understand the problem and come up with a solution. The gym is a really good place for inventions. What motivates you to keep on inventing new solutions?   Inventions just happen, pretty much. Whenever I'm able to define a problem, I'm usually always able to come up with a solution. I am lucky to be researching in areas with problems that others have not yet solved. I'll be honest, I don't really like patents that much personally. The fact is though, that companies without patents would pretty much be at the mercy of the competitors. So in my view, patents are basically company self defense. Patents keep things in balance. Were you curious about things growing up? I've always kind of been inventive. You cannot learn to become an inventor, it's either something that's in your nature or it's not. And then you need to hone the talent and learn how to work within the patent framework. Another thing that is very important is good basic education and knowledge about the field. I owe a lot to Metropolia University of Applied Sciences where I studied for my engineering degree. Do you have any advice for people who have this inventive nature and are interested in filing patents? It all starts from defining and understanding the problem. Without a thorough understanding of the problem, you can't come up with a solution. Also, when it comes to patents, it's important to know what has previously been done in your area, and be clear in exactly how your invention is different from those. Otherwise your patent can be easily rejected by the patent examiner. And finally, patents are a long process so you need patience. It can take three to five years to get a patent approved. So this is not for hasty people. What is that rock you're holding? It's my trophy, a piece of Finnish bedrock! Inventors are the bedrock of new products. Do you have any certain goals for your inventions? Before I retire I would like to have at least 50 patents to my name. - Well, he's off to a great start. Congratulations, Jarno! Follow Jarno on Twitter  

Nov 12, 2014
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Free public wi-fi Coffee Shop

Should you use a VPN?

The EFF has put together a handy guide on choosing the right VPN -- virtual private network -- that explains in simple terms why you'd want to use this type of software.   "It enables a computer to send and receive data across shared or public networks as if it is directly connected to the private network—benefiting from the functionality, security, and management policies of the private network," the guide explains. It goes on to clarify the three reasons people typically encrypt their data. Most people already using a VPN do so for the two reasons: They connect to a corporate network remotely or are attempting avoid Internet censorship in countries like China and Iran. But even if you're not using a VPN for business or digital freedom, there is a simple reason why you'd want to use a VPN. "You can also use a commercial VPN to encrypt your data as it travels over a public network, such as the Wi-Fi in an Internet café or a hotel," the EFF writes. I put together this flow chart that explains whether you're a candidate for this third reason to use a VPN: “A good number of open wi-fi providers take the time to tell you in their T&C that there are inherent risks with wireless communications and suggest using a VPN,” F-Secure Security Advisor Sean Sullivan said after we conducted a public Wi-Fi experiment. “So if you don’t take it from me, take it from them.” And even if you aren't on a public network, you may want a VPN to protect you from ubiquitous tracking elements like a perma-cookie. You can try our super simple Freedome VPN solution -- which also includes tracking protection and the ability to set up virtual locations -- free. [Image via Trevor Cummings | Flickr]

Nov 10, 2014
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