How to really protect your privacy on Facebook

It’s not just you. A lot of people are concerned about their privacy on Facebook. Some are worried about being tracked, even when they aren’t logged in. Some are worried about unintentionally sharing private information or opinions that can threaten their reputation or relationships. Others worry about exposing the private data on their machine through some tricky attack.

As Facebook’s new Timeline is being introduced now is the perfect time to think about how you use Facebook. We have given you 3 things to do before you activate Facebook’s new Timeline. We hope you’ll take those steps to review what you have and will be sharing and with whom. What more can you do?

You use smart passwords and have your PC patched and protected. You know, of course, the most important privacy feature on Facebook is the ‘Post’ button. If you make a point of NEVER sharing anything that you wouldn’t want your grandmother or your worst enemy to see publicly, you’re off to a good start.

 But what extra step can you take prevent invasive tracking and protect the private data on your computer?

Here’s what Sean from F-Secure Labs recommends: Do all of your social networking in a one browser. Use one browser exclusively for “public” behavior. Then use a separate browser for all of your private banking, shopping and viewing. This strategy helps you avoid worries about tracking and information bleeding between your private and public lives.

Want to be even safer? Use a dedicated machine for your social activity. This is an extremely wise strategy if you use your PC to manage your finances and or business.

An added advantage to using a ‘public’ browser or PC for your social networking is that you’ll constantly remind yourself that what you share online stays online.

So we want to know. What do you think of Facebook’s new Timeline?

Cheers,

Jason

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StageFright, stage fright, StageFright Android exploit

2 ways to avoid StageFright on your Android

The Android vulnerability known as StageFright has revealed the Android operating system's "heart of darkness." In theory, a simple MMS could take over your phone. The F-Secure Labs is actively monitoring for threats that target the exploit. The good news is that while the theoretical risk of attack is high and Android is consistently the target of nearly all mobile malware, we have not seen any active attacks that target it yet. But this is still a huge event that should trigger a major reconsideration of Android security in general. Our Micke explained: Android is the most widespread operating system on this planet. 48 % of the devices shipped in 2014 were Androids (Gartner). And that includes both phones, tablets, laptops and desktop computers. There’s over 1 billion active Android devices (Google’s device activation data). Most of them are vulnerable to Stagefright and many of them will never receive a patch. This is big! The ability to keep software updated is the essential task that makes security possible. Android's adaptability has helped lead to its remarkable growth. But it's also led to remarkable fragmentation in the ecosystem. "Recent data from Google suggests there are 6 different versions of Android that are widely used, with KitKat (Android 4.4) being the most popular. But it’s used by less than 40% of devices," Adam wrote on the F-Secure Business Insider blog. "The remaining 60% or so are spread out among the other five versions of the OS, and each is customized differently and receives varying levels of support from operators and OEMs." Many users cannot update at all. "Apparently the best supported method of updating your Android phone is to buy a new Android phone," F-Secure Chief Research Officer Mikko Hypponen tweeted. Obviously that option isn't available to millions of Android users. "Fragmentation also has socioeconomic implications," the EFF's Cooper Quintin wrote. "Older and cheaper phones tend to run older versions of the Android operating system, and vendors often give up supporting them or updating the software running on them. On the other hand newer and more expensive phones tend to receive updates faster and more reliably (especially Google Nexus devices)." So what should you do until then -- besides update your OS if possible and run mobile security that targets threats that take advantage of exploits like StageFright? 1. Examine the app that handles your MMS messages. Check out your Android device's default messaging app or Google Hangouts.  Make sure to disable their automatic retrieve/fetching options. This will prevent automatic execution of potential exploits on any received messages. 2. Avoid viewing or opening any pictures or videos from untrusted sources. We'll keep you updated about this situation as it develops. Cheers, Sandra [Photo by Photo Cindy | Flickr]  

August 3, 2015
Windows 10, Windows privacy and security, Windows 10 new features

5 things you need to know to feel secure on Windows 10

New versions of windows used to be like an international holiday. PC users around the world celebrated by sharing what they liked -- much of Windows 7 --- and hated -- all of Windows 8 and Vista -- about the latest version of the world's most popular operating system. In this way, Windows 10 is the end of an era. This is the "final version" of the OS. After you step up to this version, there will be continual updates but no new version to upgrade to. It's the birth of "Windows as a service," according to Verge. So if you're taking free upgrade to the new version, here are 5 things you need to know as you get used to the Windows that could be with you for the rest of your life. 1.Our Chief Research Office Mikko Hypponen noted Windows 10 still hides double extensions by default. “Consider a file named doubleclick.pdf.bat. If ‘hide extensions’ is enabled, then this will be shown in File Explorer as ‘doubleclick.pdf’. You, the user, might go ahead and double-click on it, because it’s just a PDF, right?” F-Secure Security Advisor Tom Gaffney told Infosecurity Magazine. “In truth, it’s a batch file, and whatever commands it contains will run when you double-click on it.” Keep this in mind when you do -- or DON'T -- click on unknown files. 2. You could end up sharing your Wi-Fi connection with all your contacts. There's some debate about whether or not Windows 10's Wi-Fi Sense shares your Wi-Fi connection with social media contacts by default, as Windows Phone has for a while now. ZDNet's Ed Bott says no, noting that "you have to very consciously enable sharing for a network. It's not something you'll do by accident." Security expert Brian Krebs is more skeptical, given how we're "conditioned to click 'yes' to these prompts." "In theory, someone who wanted access to your small biz network could befriend an employee or two, and drive into the office car park to be in range, and then gain access to the wireless network," The Register's Simon Rockman wrote. "Some basic protections, specifically ones that safeguard against people sharing their passwords, should prevent this." Gaffney notes that Wi-Fi Sense is “open to accidental and deliberate misuse.” So what to do? Krebs recommends the following: Prior to upgrade to Windows 10, change your Wi-Fi network name/SSID to something that includes the terms “_nomap_optout”. [This is Windows opt-out for Wi-Fi Sense]. After the upgrade is complete, change the privacy settings in Windows to disable Wi-Fi Sense sharing. 3. There are some privacy issues you should know about. Basically "whatever happens, Microsoft knows what you're doing," The Next Web's Mic Wright noted. Microsoft, according to its terms and conditions, can gather data “from you and your devices, including for example ‘app use data for apps that run on Windows’ and ‘data about the networks you connect to.'” And they can also disclose it to third parties as they feel like it. You should check your privacy settings and you can stop advertisers from know exactly who you are. Want a deep dive into the privacy issues? Visit Extreme Tech. 4. The new Action Center could be useful but it could get annoying. This notification center makes Windows feel more like an iPhone -- because isn't the point of everything digital to eventually merge into the same thing? BGR's Zach Epstein wrote "one location for all of your notifications is a welcome change." But it can get overwhelming. "In Windows 10, you can adjust notifications settings by clicking the notifications icon in the system tray," he wrote. "The click All settings, followed by System and then Notifications & actions." 5. Yes, F-Secure SAFE, Internet Security and Anti-Virus are all Windows 10 ready. [Image by Brett Morrison | Flickr]

July 30, 2015
BY 
Android

Android’s Stagefright bug – phone vendors taken with their pants down

You have all heard the classic mantra of computer security: use common sense, patch your system and install antivirus. That is still excellent advice, but the world is changing. We used to repeat that mantra over and over to the end users. Now we are entering a new era where we have to stress the importance of updates to manufacturers. We did recently write about how Chrysler reacted fairly quickly to stop Jeeps from being controlled remotely. They made a new firmware version for the vehicles, but didn’t have a good channel to distribute the update. Stagefright on Android demonstrates a similar problem, but potentially far more widespread. Let’s first take a look at Stagefright. What is it really? Stagefright is the name of a module deep inside the Android system. This module is responsible for interpreting video files and playing them on the device. The Stagefright bug is a vulnerability that allows and attacker to take over the system with specially crafted video content. Stagefright is used to automatically create previews of content received through many channels. This is what makes the Stagefright bug really bad. Anyone who can send you a message containing video can potentially break into your Android device without any actions from you. You can use common sense and not open fishy mail attachments, but that doesn’t work here. Stagefright takes a look at inbound content automatically in many cases so common sense won't help. Even worse. There’s not much we can do about it, except wait for a patch from the operator or phone vendor. And many users will be waiting in vain. This is because of how the Android system is developed and licensed. Google is maintaining the core Linux-based system and releasing it under an open license. Phone vendors are using Android, but often not as it comes straight from Google. They try to differentiate and modifies Android to their liking. Google reacted quickly and made a fix for the Stagefright bug. This fix will be distributed to their own Nexus-smartphones soon. But it may not be that simple for the other vendors. They need to verify that the patch is compatible with their customizations, and releasing it to their customers may be a lengthy process. If they even want to patch handsets. Some vendors seems to see products in the cheap smartphone segment as disposable goods. They are not supposed to be long-lived and post-sale maintenance is just a cost. Providing updates and patches would just postpone replacement of the phone, and that’s not in the vendor’s interest. This attitude explains why several Android vendors have very poor processes and systems for sending out updates. Many phones will never be patched. Let’s put this into perspective. Android is the most widespread operating system on this planet. 48 % of the devices shipped in 2014 were Androids (Gartner). And that includes both phones, tablets, laptops and desktop computers. There’s over 1 billion active Android devices (Google’s device activation data). Most of them are vulnerable to Stagefright and many of them will never receive a patch. This is big! Let’s however keep in mind that there is no widespread malware utilizing this vulnerability at the time of writing. But all the ingredients needed to make a massive and harmful worm outbreak are there. Also remember that the bug has existed in Android for over five years, but not been publically known until now. It is perfectly possible that intelligence agencies are utilizing it silently for their own purposes. But can we do anything to protect us? That’s the hard question. This is not intended to be a comprehensive guide, but it is however possible to give some simple advice. You can stop worrying if you have a really old device with an Android version lower than 2.2. It’s not vulnerable. Google Nexus devices will be patched soon. A patch has also been released for devices with the CyanogenMod system. The privacy-optimized BlackPhone is naturally a fast-mover in cases like this. Other devices? It’s probably best to just google for “Stagefright” and the model or vendor name of your device. Look for two things. Information about if and when your device will receive an update and for instructions about how to tweak settings to mitigate the threat. Here’s an example.   Safe surfing, Micke Image by Rob Bulmahn under CC BY 2.0

July 30, 2015
BY