5 Ways to Make Online Dating Safer

When it comes to online dating, it seems there are two types of people: 1) People who do it, and 2) people who make fun of it. And many single people have found themselves in both groups.

The fact is millions, if not billions, of relationships have begun online. And that number is growing as the lines between offline and online merge.

Online dating is an especially interesting issue for us because it merges many of the issues we think about most: security, online safety, content control and social networks.

The fact is by “putting yourself out there” online, you do open yourself to risks you might avoid otherwise. You may also open yourself up to the person you’ll spend your whole life with. If you want to give it a try or try it again, we recommend a few precautions.

1. Trust your instincts.
A rule of dating that is often mocked is “Be yourself.” It’s so vague and unhelpful. But what people seem to be saying is “Trust you gut.” If something gives you a bad feeling, if you regret signing up for a site, if you regret making a date, step back. The great thing about dating online is that you’re increasing your options. So don’t worry about blowing one opportunity. If something gives you a bad feeling, back off and apologize. Don’t be afraid to cut off contact or even erase emails before you open them. It’s your gut, protect it.

2. Remember that the Internet never forgets.
Anything you do online creates some sort of data trail. Any message you send can be made public. Any picture you post can be reposted. In the past, only celebrities had to worry about their private activities being made public. Now we all do. So imagine that anything you share could go public and definitely close any accounts once you’re done using them.

3. Secure your PC.
When using any social network, you should make sure all the applications and your security software are patched and protected. (Our Health Check makes that easy.) Also keep in mind that by putting your email out in the world, you’re making yourself more vulnerable to email scams. For this reason we recommend never clicking on the links in emails.

4. Get the low down.
Talk to your friends who have tried out online dating. Ask them for their tips and regrets. If you don’t feel comfortable chatting with someone you know, Match.com has a nice list of all the possible safety precautions you should be taking. Also, Google the people you’ll be meeting, and their email addresses. You may be surprised at what you find.

5. Go the extra mile.
The Electronic Frontier Foundation recommends, “Get a throw-away email address, avoid using your name, and avoid paid sites that would elicit your credit card number and billing information. To maintain the highest levels of privacy, consider taking steps to obfuscate your IP address, such as using a VPN.” Also, you should use https on secured networks whenever possible. Keep in mind that any site you trust with your data is only as good as its privacy policy and its word.

Cheers,

Jason

CC image: Julien Haler

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June 30, 2016
Could the Sony and Hacking Team hacks have been detected sooner?

Hacks in the Headlines: Two Huge Breaches That Could Have Been Detected

The Sony hack of late 2014 sent shock waves through Hollywood that rippled out into the rest of the world for months. The ironic hack of the dubious surveillance software company Hacking Team last summer showed no one is immune to a data breach - not even a company that specializes in breaking into systems. After a big hack, some of the first questions asked are how the attacker got in, and whether it could have been prevented. But today we're asking a different question: whether, once the attacker was already in the network, the breach could have been detected. And stopped. Here's why: Advanced attacks like the ones that hit Sony and Hacking Team are carried out by highly skilled attackers who specifically target a certain organization. Preventive measures block the great majority of threats out there, but advanced attackers know how to get around a company's defenses. The better preventive security a company has in place, the harder it will be to get in…but the most highly skilled, highly motivated attackers will still find a way in somehow. That's where detection comes in. Thinking like an attacker If an attacker does get through a company's defensive walls, it's critical to be able detect their presence as early as possible, to limit the damage they can do. There has been no official confirmation of when Sony's actual breach first took place, but some reports say the company had been breached for a year before the attackers froze up Sony's systems and began leaking volumes of juicy info about the studio's inner workings. That's a long time for someone to be roaming around in a network, harvesting data. So how does one detect an attacker inside a network? By thinking like an attacker. And thinking like an attacker requires having a thorough knowledge of how attackers work, to be able to spot their telltale traces and distinguish them from legitimate users. Advanced or APT (Advanced Persistent Threat) attacks differ depending on the situation and the goals of the attacker, but in general their attacks tend to follow a pattern. Once they've chosen a target company and performed reconnaissance to find out more about the company and how to best compromise it, their attacks generally cover the following phases: 1. Gain a foothold. The first step is to infect a machine within the organization. This is typically done by exploiting software vulnerabilities on servers or endpoints, or by using social engineering tactics such as phishing, spear-phishing, watering holes, or man-in-the-middle attacks. 2. Achieve persistence. The initial step must also perform some action that lets the attacker access the system later at will. This means a persistent component that creates a backdoor the attacker can re-enter through later. 3. Perform network reconnaissance. Gather information about the initial compromised system and the whole network to figure out where and how to advance in the network. 4. Lateral movement. Gain access to further systems as needed, depending on what the goal of the attack is. Steps 2-4 are then repeated as needed to gain access to the target data or system. 5. Collect target data. Identify and collect files, credentials, emails, and other forms of intercepted communications. 6. Exfiltrate target data. Copy data to the attackers via network. Steps 5 and 6 can also happen in small increments over time. In some cases these steps are augmented with sabotaging data or systems. 7. Cover tracks. Evidence of what was done and how it was done is easily erased by deleting and modifying logs and file access times. This can happen throughout the attack, not just at the end. 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In the case of Hacking Team, the hacker known as Phineas Fisher used a network scanner called nmap, a common network scanning tool, to gather information about the organization’s internal network and figure out how to advance the attack (step 3). Nmap activity on a company internal network should be flagged as a suspicious activity. For moving inside the network, step 4, he used methods based on the built-in Windows management framework, PowerShell, and the well-known tool psexec from SysInternals. These techniques could also potentially have been picked up on from the way they were used that would differ from a legitimate user. These are just a few examples of how a knowledge of how attackers work can be used to detect and stop them. In practice, F-Secure does this with a new service we've just launched called Rapid Detection Service. The service uses a combination of human and machine intelligence to monitor what's going on inside a company network and detect suspicious behavior. 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May 31, 2016
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POLL: What Changes To Twitter Would You Like To See?

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