More Than Mobile Sweepstakes — Win a Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1

This sweepstakes is now closed. Please ‘like’ our Facebook page for updates on more F-Secure news and promotions.

Congratulations to our winner, Earl.

For years, analysts predicted that all of our devices — PCs, laptops, DVD players, mobile phones — would merge into one all-purpose device that would handle everything we do digitally. Surprisingly we are seeing more and more that people are actually travelling with up to three devices — a phone, a tablet and a laptop. All three perform similar functions but provide vastly different experiences.

We’ve discussed the proper way to secure all your devices. So now we have a question for you: For mobile connections, do you use a tablet a mobile phone or both?

By answering this question in the comments below, you’ll be entered to win a Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 with F-Secure Mobile Security.

Just read the rules and post your answer in the comments below.

BONUS ENTRY: Want an extra chance to win? Click here and take our quick mobile survey then post the comment “SURVEY COMPLETED” in an ADDITIONAL comment below.

Thanks for your time,

Anna

CC image by 3 Sverige

F-Secure Internet Security 2012
MORE THAN MOBILE SWEEPSTAKES – COMPETITION RULES AND PRIZES

By entering the Safer Shopping Sweepstakes promotion you accept the Official Competition Rules and the Privacy Policy (http://www.f-secure.com/en_US/privacy.html).

If you do not accept these rules, please do not enter this promotion.

1. The sponsor of this promotion is F-Secure Corporation, located at Tammasaarenkatu 7, Po. Box 24, 00181 Helsinki, Finland (“Sponsor”).
2. The promotion will begin at 12:00 PM PDT on April 3 , 2012 and end at 12:00 PM PDT April 19, 2012.
3. This promotion is void where prohibited or restricted by law. No purchase is necessary to enter.
4. 2 prizes — Samsung Galaxy 10.1 16 GB with a retail value of $449.99 and 1 F-Secure Mobile Security with a retail value of $39.99 — will be given as prizes in this promotion at the close of the competition.
5. Only two (2) entries per person per Sweepstakes will be accepted. Each comment posted constitutes an entry. Further attempts made by the same person and entries generated by a script, computer programs, macro, programmed, robotic or other automated means will be disqualified.
6. The winner will be chosen randomly from the people who participated in the competition by commenting on the “More Than Mobile Sweepstakes” page. Sponsor will notify the winner via email. If the winner does not respond within seven (7) days, he or she will forfeit the prize and another winner will be randomly chosen. This prize is shipped to the winner within 45 days of the making successful contact with the winner.
7. The winners are responsible for any taxes associated with receipt of the prizes. Sponsor reserves the right to substitute the prizes with other prizes of equal or greater value if the prize is not available for any reason.
8. Odds of winning the prizes depend upon the total number of eligible entries received.
9. No purchase or software download is necessary to enter or win. Purchase or software download will not increase your chances of winning.
10. To enter, visit http://safeandsavvy.f-secure.com/2012/04/03/more-than-mobile-sweepstakes/ and comment on the post up to two times. To comment you must provide your email address, which will not be made public. Entries are the property of Sponsor and will not be acknowledged or returned. Comments made be edited by F-Secure without explanation. We are not responsible for the content posted or linked.
11. Any entrant who attempts to cheat or tamper with the More Than Mobile Sweepstakes shall be disqualified by the Sponsor’s sole discretion.
12. The name of the winner will be announced via the F-Secure Twitter channel http://twitter.com/FSecure, F-Secure Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/FSecure and F-Secure’s Safe and Savvy blog http://safeandsavvy.f-secure.com/ once the winner has been contacted. By entering, the entrant agrees that his/her name, country and/or picture can be published at F-Secure’s aforementioned channels if he/she wins.
13. By entering, entrants agree to release and hold harmless Sponsor and all of its representatives from and against any and all costs, expenses, claims, demands, proceedings, suits, actions and/or liabilities for any injuries, death, loss or damage of any kind arising from or in connection with i) the distribution of any prize, ii) entrants’ participation in and/or entry into the campaign, acceptance or use of any prize or unavailability of any prize. Prizes are provided “AS IS” without warranty of any kind from the sponsor.
14. Employees of Sponsor and family members of such employees are not eligible to enter.

© 2011 F-SECURE CORPORATION. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

Canon PowerShot SX130 IS

More posts from this topic

Christine Bejerasco

Meet the Online Guardian Working to Keep You Safe

Every time you go online, your personal privacy is at risk – it’s as simple as that. Whether you’re creating an account on a website, shopping, or just browsing, information like your email, IP address and browsing history are potential targets for interested parties.   All too often, that information is sold on or sometimes even stolen without you even knowing it. And the threats to our online privacy and security are evolving. Fast.   As F-Secure’s Online Protection Service Lead, Christine Bejerasco’s job is to make life online safer and more secure.   “We’re basically online defenders. And when your job is to create solutions that help protect people, the criminals and attackers you’re protecting them against always step up their game. So it’s like an arms race. They come up with new ways of attacking users and our job is to outsmart them and defend our users,” Christine says.   Sounds pretty dramatic, right? Well that’s because it is. While it used to be that the biggest threat to your online privacy was spam and viruses, the risks of today and tomorrow are potentially way more serious.   “Right now we’re in the middle of different waves of ransomware. That’s basically malware that turns people’s files into formats they can’t use. We’ve already seen cases of companies and individual people having their systems and files hijacked for ransom. It’s serious stuff and in many cases very sad. If your online assets aren’t protected right now you should kind of feel like you’re going to bed at night with your front door not only unlocked but wide open.”   Christine and her team of 11 online security superheroes (eight full-time members and three super-talented interns) are on the case in Helsinki.   Here’s more on Christine and her work in her own words:   Where are you from? The Philippines   Where do you live and work? I live in Espoo and work at F-Secure in Ruoholahti, Helsinki.   Describe your job in 160 characters or less? Online guardian who strives to give F-Secure users a worry-free online experience.   One word that best describes your work? Engaging   How long is a typical work day for you? There is no typical workday. It ranges from 6 – 13 hours, depending on what’s happening.   What sparked your interest in online security? At the start it was just a job. As a computer science graduate, I was just looking for a job where I could do something related to my field. And then when I joined a software security company in the Philippines, I was introduced to this world of online threats and it’s really hard to leave all the excitement behind. So I’ve stayed in the industry ever since.   Craziest story you’ve ever heard about online protection breach? Ashley Madison. Some people thought it was just a funny story, but it had pretty serious consequences for some of the people on that list.   Does it frustrate you that so many people don’t care about protecting their online privacy? Yeah, it definitely does. But you grow to understand that people don’t value things until they lose it. It’s like insurance. You don’t think about it until something bad happens and then you care.   What’s your greatest work achievement? Shaping the online protection service in the Labs from its starting stages to where we are today.   What’s your idea of happiness? Road trips and a bottle of really good beer.   Which (non-work-related) talent would you most like to have? Hmmm… tough. Maybe, stock-market prediction skills?   What are your favorite apps? Things Stumbleupon   What blogs do you like? Security blogs (F-Secure Security blog of course and others – too many to list.) Self-Help Blogs (Zen Habits, Marc and Angel, etc.)   Who do you admire most? I admire quite a few people for different reasons. Warren Buffett for his intensity, simplicity and generosity. Mikko Hyppönen for his idealism and undying dedication to the online security fight. And Mother Theresa for embodying the true meaning of how being alive is like being in school for your soul.   Do you ever, ever go online without protection? Not with systems associated to me personally, or with someone else. But of course, when we are analyzing online threats, then yes.   See how to take control of your online privacy – watch the film and hear more from Christine.  See how Freedome VPN will keep you protected and get it now.

July 14, 2016
BY 
Juhannus

How To Prepare Yourself and Your Phone For Juhannus

In Finland, there is this thing called juhannus. A few years ago, our former colleague Hetta described it like this: Well, Midsummer – or juhannus – as it is called in Finnish, is one of the most important public holidays in our calendar. It is celebrated, as you probably guessed, close to the dates of the Summer Solstice, when day is at its longest in the northern hemisphere. Finland being so far up north, the sun doesn’t set on juhannus at all. Considering that in the winter we get the never ending night, it’s no surprise we celebrate the sun not setting. So what do Finns do to celebrate juhannus? I already told you we flock to our summer cottages, but what then? We decorate the cottage with birch branches to celebrate the summer, we stock up on new potatoes which are just now in season and strawberries as well. We fire up the barbecue and eat grilled sausages to our hearts content. We burn bonfires that rival with the unsetting sun. And we get drunk. If that isn't vivid enough, this video may help: [protected-iframe id="f18649f0b62adf8eb1ec638fa5066050-10874323-9129869" info="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fsuomifinland100%2Fvideos%2F1278272918868972%2F&show_text=0&width=560" width="560" height="315" frameborder="0" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no"] And because the celebration is just so... celebratory, it's easy to lose your phone. So here are a few ways to prepare yourself for a party that lasts all night. 1. Don't use 5683 as your passcode. That spells love and it's also one of the first passcodes anyone trying to crack into your phone will try. So use something much more creative -- and use a 6-digit code if you can on your iPhone. You can also encrypt your Android. 2. Write down your IMEI number. If you lose your phone, you're going to need this so make sure you have it written down somewhere safe. 3. Back your content up. This makes your life a lot easier if your party goes too well and it's pretty simple on any iOS device. Just make sure you're using a strong, unique password for your iCloud account. Unfortunately on an Android phone, you'll have to use a third-party app. 4. Maybe just leave it home. Enjoy being with your friends and assume that they'll get the pictures you need to refresh your memory. And while you're out you can give your phone a quick internal "clean" with our free Boost app. [Image by Janne Hellsten | Flickr]

June 22, 2016
Could the Sony and Hacking Team hacks have been detected sooner?

Hacks in the Headlines: Two Huge Breaches That Could Have Been Detected

The Sony hack of late 2014 sent shock waves through Hollywood that rippled out into the rest of the world for months. The ironic hack of the dubious surveillance software company Hacking Team last summer showed no one is immune to a data breach - not even a company that specializes in breaking into systems. After a big hack, some of the first questions asked are how the attacker got in, and whether it could have been prevented. But today we're asking a different question: whether, once the attacker was already in the network, the breach could have been detected. And stopped. Here's why: Advanced attacks like the ones that hit Sony and Hacking Team are carried out by highly skilled attackers who specifically target a certain organization. Preventive measures block the great majority of threats out there, but advanced attackers know how to get around a company's defenses. The better preventive security a company has in place, the harder it will be to get in…but the most highly skilled, highly motivated attackers will still find a way in somehow. That's where detection comes in. Thinking like an attacker If an attacker does get through a company's defensive walls, it's critical to be able detect their presence as early as possible, to limit the damage they can do. There has been no official confirmation of when Sony's actual breach first took place, but some reports say the company had been breached for a year before the attackers froze up Sony's systems and began leaking volumes of juicy info about the studio's inner workings. That's a long time for someone to be roaming around in a network, harvesting data. So how does one detect an attacker inside a network? By thinking like an attacker. And thinking like an attacker requires having a thorough knowledge of how attackers work, to be able to spot their telltale traces and distinguish them from legitimate users. Advanced or APT (Advanced Persistent Threat) attacks differ depending on the situation and the goals of the attacker, but in general their attacks tend to follow a pattern. Once they've chosen a target company and performed reconnaissance to find out more about the company and how to best compromise it, their attacks generally cover the following phases: 1. Gain a foothold. The first step is to infect a machine within the organization. This is typically done by exploiting software vulnerabilities on servers or endpoints, or by using social engineering tactics such as phishing, spear-phishing, watering holes, or man-in-the-middle attacks. 2. Achieve persistence. The initial step must also perform some action that lets the attacker access the system later at will. This means a persistent component that creates a backdoor the attacker can re-enter through later. 3. Perform network reconnaissance. Gather information about the initial compromised system and the whole network to figure out where and how to advance in the network. 4. Lateral movement. Gain access to further systems as needed, depending on what the goal of the attack is. Steps 2-4 are then repeated as needed to gain access to the target data or system. 5. Collect target data. Identify and collect files, credentials, emails, and other forms of intercepted communications. 6. Exfiltrate target data. Copy data to the attackers via network. Steps 5 and 6 can also happen in small increments over time. In some cases these steps are augmented with sabotaging data or systems. 7. Cover tracks. Evidence of what was done and how it was done is easily erased by deleting and modifying logs and file access times. This can happen throughout the attack, not just at the end. For each phase, there are various tactics, techniques and procedures attackers use to accomplish the task as covertly as possible. Combined with an awareness and visibility of what is happening throughout the network, knowledge of these tools and techniques is what will enable companies to detect attackers in their networks and stop them in their tracks. Following the signs Sony may have been breached for a year, but signs of the attack were there all along. Perhaps these signs just weren't being watched for - or perhaps they were missed. The attackers tried to cover their tracks (step 7) with two specific tools that forged logs and file access and creation times - tools that could have been detected as being suspicious. These tools were used throughout the attack, not just at the end, so detection would have happened well before all the damage was done, saving Sony and its executives much embarrassment, difficult PR, lost productivity, and untold millions of dollars. In the case of Hacking Team, the hacker known as Phineas Fisher used a network scanner called nmap, a common network scanning tool, to gather information about the organization’s internal network and figure out how to advance the attack (step 3). Nmap activity on a company internal network should be flagged as a suspicious activity. For moving inside the network, step 4, he used methods based on the built-in Windows management framework, PowerShell, and the well-known tool psexec from SysInternals. These techniques could also potentially have been picked up on from the way they were used that would differ from a legitimate user. These are just a few examples of how a knowledge of how attackers work can be used to detect and stop them. In practice, F-Secure does this with a new service we've just launched called Rapid Detection Service. The service uses a combination of human and machine intelligence to monitor what's going on inside a company network and detect suspicious behavior. Our promise is that once we've detected a breach, we'll alert the company within 30 minutes. They'll find out about it first from us, not from the headlines. One F-Secure analyst sums it up nicely: "The goal is to make it impossible for an attacker to wiggle his way from an initial breach to his eventual goal." After all, breaches do happen. The next step, then, is to be prepared.   Photo: Getty Images

May 31, 2016