5 Ways to Connect Safely on Vacation

84.6% of 21st century vacationers use their mobile devices to check their email, according to Prosper Mobile Insights. The thought of being without a smartphone, tablet or a computer, even while off in a foreign country, is a foreign thought for most of us. And if you’re always connected, you’re always at risk of some online nastiness.

F-Secure Labs has covered the recent discovery of the Flame malware, a cyberweapon that is being used to target very specific users for surveillance purposes. Unless you’re a nuclear scientist or the system administrator of a weapons developer, you’re not likely to be targeted by such advanced malware.

Still regular, everyday cyber criminals will take advantage of any sloppy mistakes you make while relaxing. So let’s get a few security precautions out of the way so you can have a good time.

1. Update your devices before you go.
Make your system software is updated on your PC, smartphone and tablet at home on your safe and secure network. A patched and protected system along with updated security software is your best protection against threats. (Our free Health Check makes that easy.) Avoid taking software updates while on the road, especially while using hotel Wi-Fi. Criminals have used faked updates on hotel Wi-Fi to infect users with malware. If you follow Krebs’s Number One Rule for Staying Safe Online–“If you didn’t go looking for it, don’t install it!”—you’ll be fine.

2. Back up your hard drives and put a remote lock on your phone.
Traveling with the only digital copy of irreplaceable data or media is not a wise choice. Before you leave your house, back up your devices hard drives. (If you don’t have a backup option, you can try our Online Backup for free.) You should also put a software on your phone that gives you the ability to lock a lost phone and erase it if necessary. (Our free Anti-Theft for Mobile does this for Android and Symbian phones.)

3. Use direct DSL or cable connection when you can; if not, use encrypted Wi-Fi with a VPN.
If free public Wi-Fi is your only option and you do not have a VPN, consider yourself watched. Try to use one-time passwords for services that offer them such as Facebook and Hotmail. Using free Wi-Fi or a public computer for shopping and banking is definitely not recommended.

4. Don’t click on links or attachments in email, especially from email you were not expecting.
This is a piece of advice from the Labs that we keep repeating because everyone knows the attachment but the link part is new. Links can lead to scams, which on your phone especially may look as official as any bank website.

5. Be careful about sharing your location.
Most of the fear about sharing location online comes from a very few examples of people being robbed by Facebook friends. The basic rule is don’t tell anyone online that you’re not home who you wouldn’t tell in real life. So you probably don’t want to broadcast your vacation on your public social networks. Why not use email—like we did in the olden days?

Using your devices to improve your vacation is not a problem as long, as you take a few precautions. You earned the chance to rest and relax so enjoy it.

Cheers,
Jason

[CC image by gavdana]

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