Privacy Please

Why secure businesses are productive businesses

It’s our pleasure to introduce Emma, an F-Secure Marketing Specialist who works in Global Marketing. She specializes in corporate protection that keeps businesses thriving. With the launch of our new Software Updater solution for business, we’re going to be focusing more on corporate security in the future so we thought we’d start by introducing Emma and giving you her thoughts on the challenges our corporate customers face.

We started off by asking Emma what it is she likes most about her job.

“It’s quite difficult to pinpoint one single thing that I most enjoy at work,” she told us, “since one of my favorite things about my job is the variety of tasks. However, one of the best parts of my job is definitely creating content. Telling stories is fun, and I hope that we also succeed in communicating in ways and about topics that are relevant and of interest to our target audience.”

That audience is made up of F-Secure partners —some of the best and brightest business minds around the globe.

Like many of us at F-Secure, Emma enjoys the unique opportunity to work with and around some of the world’s foremost experts in digital threats.

“During my time at F-Secure, I have had the chance to learn not only a whole lot of new things about marketing, but also about the industry and the threat landscape,” she said.

Her job also puts her in touch with the current challenges that exist in securing the workplace.

“There’s no single threat that most affects businesses,” she told us. “Rather, organizations of all sizes are affected by cyber crime in all it’s different forms and variations, but one clear purpose: to steal money and confidential data. Even small businesses are increasingly becoming the target of these attacks, as many of them lack the resources and expertise to protect their irreplaceable assets.”

The threat landscape is always evolving but one aspect that is increasingly scary to businesses is software vulnerabilities.

“Recently, we’ve seen an increasing amount of attempts to gain access to a computer through vulnerability exploitation – the art of finding a security hole in any software and using that as a way to infect the machine. Vulnerabilities in Java and Internet Explorer have been all over the news, and criminals haven’t left these opportunities unused.”

She pointed out a perfect example of this. @TimoHirvonen from the F-Secure Labs recently posted an example of just how quickly a criminal can go from vulnerability to exploit. It’s scary.

That’s where F-Secure comes in, of course.

Emma explains: “Our portfolio covers a whole range of customer needs, from organizations willing to manage their solution on their own to a fully outsourced solution where IT security is managed by a trusted partner. We protect all layers of the organization from desktop PCs, laptops and mobile phones to file servers and email servers. In addition, our advanced management tools make it possible to monitor and manage a network.”

F-Secure was the first security company in the world to offer security as a service. Many businesses find that by relying on us for the best protection in the world doesn’t just save them time and money. It frees them up to concentrate on what matters most.

“Security as a Service has proven to be a success and it is increasingly popular among businesses. Outsourcing security to a partner means worry-free and reliable protection that is always backed up by F-Secure’s world class technology,” Emma told us. “When professionals take care of security, you can focus on your core business. Security as a Service is a great solution especially for those businesses, large and small, that don’t have the necessary expertise.”

How can F-Secure affect your workplace?

“Ensuring high-quality protection ensures uninterrupted work and keeps an organization running. Actually, the challenge with security is that it is only noticed when something negative happens,” she said.

But for Emma, security that works best is security that you don’t notice.

“Security is paramount for business but it should not come at the cost of usability. Our objective is to offer our customers the best protection without unnecessary impact on performance or distraction.”

When this happens everyone performs better.

“At best, IT security can improve productivity,” she said. “Think about email, for example. Email is a vital business tool for companies, but spam email traffic can reduce employee productivity and burden the IT infrastructure. Effective and accurate virus and spam filtering saves internal network bandwidth and increases productivity.”

Most businesses have had email security in mind for years but forward-thinking businesses are thinking ahead. Optimal software performance prevents online crime and keeps businesses functioning optimally when it matters most.

“Another example could be updating software. Keeping software up-to-date fixes holes in security,” Emma told us, “but can also keep software and applications running smoothly and reliably during critical times.”

For business, those critical times are the last moments when you want to think about security. And that’s why Emma and F-Secure are here, so you don’t have to.

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F-Secure Bringing a totally new Future for the Internet to SLUSH 2015

#SLUSH15 is almost here, and F-Secure’s participating in this year’s event in a big way. There’s going to be a big #smartsecurity announcement about the Internet of Things, as well as a couple of presentations from F-Secure personnel. SLUSH, a well-known exposition for startups in the tech industry, has become a huge international event. Both SLUSH and F-Secure call Helsinki home, so it’s only natural for F-Secure to be an active participant at the annual conference. F-Secure made waves last year after the cybersecurity company hacked the venue’s bathrooms to get people talking about online privacy. Several of the company’s researchers and personnel also put in appearances at last year’s SLUSH, including cyber security expert Mikko Hypponen, and F-Secure’s Executive Vice President, Consumer Security, Samu Konttinen. [youtube] [youtube] And they’re both back this year! This year, Samu will be giving a keynote address on SLUSH’s Silver Stage. His talk is called “Your home, your rules – The internet of what ifs”, and runs from 11:45am to 12:00pm (Helsinki time) on November 11th. Samu’s enthusiasm for topics related to security and online privacy will give people valuable insights into how IoT devices are creating new security challenges, and what people can do to protect themselves. Mikko will be appearing on SLUSH’s Black Stage at 9:25am (Helsinki time) on November 12th, where he’ll deliver a talk called “The Online Arms Race”. Mikko recently did an interview about this same topic for, so you can check that out if you want a quick preview about Mikko’s thoughts on this matter. You can follow all of F-Secure’s SLUSH news by following @FSecure_Sense, @FSecure_IoT, and @FSecure on Twitter.

November 10, 2015
Mikko Hypponen, Leo Laporte, Triangulation

5 things Mikko Hyppönen has learned from 25 years of fighting viruses

F-Secure Chief Research Officer Mikko Hyppönen sat down on Monday for a video chat with renowned tech journalist and broadcaster Leo Laporte on Triangulation. Laporte has admired Mikko and F-Secure from afar for more than twenty years, the host explained. So this first talk gave the two IT stalwarts a chance to talk over Mikko's nearly quarter century of work at F-Secure -- which he joined as a coder in 1991 when we were still known as Data Fellows. You can watch the whole interview below or download the audio here: [youtube] The whole show is worth your time but to get ready to mark Mikko's silver anniversary at F-Secure, we thought we'd pull out some interesting lessons he's learned in more than two decades of tangling with digital threats. Driving a forklift -- Mikko's job before joining F-Secure -- has one big advantage over being an internationally known virus hunter. Once you're done with work for the day, you don't think about your job at all. Mikko told Leo that being Chief Research Officer at a company that protects hundreds of millions of computers doesn't give you that luxury. Some early malware creators went on to some very interesting things. Mikko told Leo about his trip to Pakistan to meet the two brothers who wrote the first PC virus more than 25 years ago, which you can watch below. Basit Farooq Alvi and Amjad Farooq Alvi wrote the program for what they saw as a legitimate purpose -- preventing copyright infringement. Today the brothers along with a third brother run a successful telecommunications business. Robert Tapan Morris -- the creator of Morrisworm the first computer worm -- is a member of the Computer Science faculty at MIT and a partner in Y Combinator, which helps launch tech startups.[youtube] His number one security tip? Back up your stuff. "Back up your computer, your iPad, your phone. And back it up so you can access it even if your house burns down." The numbers when it comes to malware are huge. F-Secure Labs receives about 350,000 malware samples a day, seven days a week. "The amount of new detections we build on those samples every day is usually around 10,000... 20 [thousand] on a bad day." Mobile malware isn't a big problem -- except, perhaps, in China -- because Android and iOS are very restrictive. "If you are a programmer, you cannot program on your iPad," Mikko explained. All apps that end up in the Play or App Store have to be approved by Google or Apple respectively. This model, which Mikko compares to the PlayStation and Xbox ecosystems, may be good for security, but it does have some negative consequences. "It's also a little bit sad in the sense that when you have these closed environments, it's sort of like converting the users from producers to consumers." Mikko wrapped up the interview by explaining F-Secure's principles when it comes to protecting and respecting users' data: "We try to sell our products the old-fashioned way. You pay for it with your money, not your privacy." Cheers, Sandra P.S.: For some bonus Mikko, watch a public lecture he gave this week at Estonian Information Technology College. [youtube]

October 15, 2015