NSA, GCHQ, listening, mobile calls, privacy

5 Ways To Secure Your Office Network

Threats facing businesses cannot be narrowed down to any specific type of attacks. Instead, what most businesses are fighting against is a complex engine of cybercrime with many different forms and variations. Criminals are constantly devising new forms of attacks to stay ahead of the game.

Keeping up with these changing tactics is a job for the F-Secure Labs—not you. But there are some basic precautions you can and must take so that way the expert virus hunters know can be used to protect your company’s irreplaceable assets.

1. Never reuse your work passwords for personal accounts.
You need to make sure your work passwords are strong, reasonable for you to remember and unique! The last thing you want is a Facebook or webmail hack to lead to a compromise of your work network. Also avoid using your work email for personal accounts.

2. Use a separate browser for work and web browsing.
This is good for both focus and security reasons. If you do any banking for work or use any secure credentials do it all in one browser such as Chrome or Firefox. Then use another browser for research or personal communications to minimize the chances of compromising your company data.

3. Always lock your PC when you’re not in front of it.
This piece of advice almost goes without saying but we have to remind you that an unlocked PC should be thought of like an open wallet. You probably wouldn’t ever walk away with that in plain sight, would you?

4. Make sure you’re running the latest versions of all your software.
Yes, that’s all your software, like operating systems, plugins such as Flash and Java, Microsoft Office and any browsers in use – not just security software. However, keeping up with software updates can be a time-consuming, costly process. Our new Software Updater feature makes this easy.

5.  Be sure your organization has solid security product coverage on all layers of your IT environment, from laptops and desktops to servers and mobiles.
In case you’re unsure of how to stay protected or lack the resources for it, find an expert who can guide you through security issues and knows the dangers out there.

We believe that keeping your organization secure doesn’t have to be time consuming or difficult. With the right solution and the right partner, you can devote your time and resources to your commercial priorities – without compromising on security.

Cheers,

Emma

More posts from this topic

browser security, business security, banking trojan

The Devil’s in… the browser

This is the fourth in a series of posts about Cyber Defense that happened to real people in real life, costing very real money. It was only just past 1 pm, but Magda was already exhausted. She had recently fired her assistant, so she was now having to personally handle all of the work at her law office. With the aching pain in her head and monstrous hunger mounting in her stomach, Magda thought it was time for a break. She sat at her desk with a salad she had bought earlier that morning and decided she’d watch a short online video her friends had recently told her about. She typed the title in the browser and clicked on a link that took her to the site. A message popped up that the recording couldn’t be played because of a missing plugin. Magda didn’t have much of an idea what the “plugin” was, which wasn’t surprising considering that her computer knowledge was basic at best – she knew enough to use one at work, but that was pretty much all. It was the recently sacked assistant, supported by an outsourced IT firm, who took care of all things related to computers and software. A post-it stuck to Magda’s desk had been unsuccessfully begging her to install an antivirus program. “What was this about?”, Magda tried to remember. At moments like this, she regretted letting the girl go. After some time, she recalled that her assistant had mentioned something about a monthly subscription plan for some antivirus software to protect the computers, tablets and mobile phones. This solution, flexible and affordable for small businesses like Magda’s firm, had also been also recommended by the outsourced IT provider. Despite a nagging feeling that something wasn’t right, she clicked “install”. After a few seconds, the video actually played. Magda was very proud of herself: she had made the plugin thing work! A few days later, she logged into her internet banking system to pay her firm’s bills. As she looked at the balance of the account, she couldn’t believe her eyes. The money was gone! The transaction history showed transfers to accounts that were completely unknown to her. She couldn’t understand how somebody was able to break in and steal her money. The bank login page was encrypted, and besides that, she was the only person who knew the login credentials... At the bank she learnt that they had recorded a user login and transfer orders. Everything had been according to protocol, so the bank had no reason to be suspicious. The bank’s security manager suggested to Magda that she may have been the victim of a hacker’s attack. The IT firm confirmed this suspicion after inspecting Magda’s computer. Experts discovered that the plugin Magda had downloaded to watch the video online was actually malware that stole the login credentials of email accounts, social networking sites and online banking services. Magda immediately changed her passwords and decided to secure them better. She finally had good antivirus software installed, which is now protecting all of the data stored on her computer. She recalled that her bank had long been advising to do that, but she had disregarded their advice. If only she hadn’t... Her omission cost her a lot of money. She was happy, though, that money was all she lost. She didn’t even want to imagine what might have happened if any of her case or clients information had been compromised. That would have been the end of her legal career. "If you have to use dangerous plugins like Java to do banking, you can enable those in one browser and use it only for the banking stuff," F-Secure Director of Security Response Antti Tikkanen explains.​ To get an inside look at business security, be sure to follow our Business Insider blog.

July 28, 2015
hacking team, hack like a champion, why hacking team matters

3 reasons the Hacking Team story matters from Mikko Hypponen

Hacking is in the news. The U.S. recently disclosed that it was the victim of what may the biggest, most consequential hack ever. We hacked some politicians. And a group called "Hacking Team" was hacked itself. Brian Krebs reports: Last week, hacktivists posted online 400 GB worth of internal emails, documents and other data stolen from Hacking Team, an Italian security firm that has earned the ire of privacy and civil liberties groups for selling spy software to governments worldwide. The disclosure of a zero-day vulnerability for the Adobe Flash Player the team has used has already led to a clear increase of Flash exploits. But this story has a larger significance, involving serious questions about who governs who can buy spyware surveillance software companies and more. Our Chief Research Office Mikko Hyppönen has been following this story and tweeting insights and context. Reporters from around the world have asked him to elaborate on his thoughts. Here's a look at what he's been telling them 1) What is your opinion about the Hacking Team story? This is a big story. Companies like Hacking Team have been coming to the market over the last 10 years as more and more governments wanted to gain offensive online attack capability but did not have the technical know-how to do it by themselves. There's lots of money in this business. Hacking Team customers included intelligence agencies, militaries and law enforcement. Was what Hacking Team was doing legal? Beats me. I'm not a lawyer. Was what Hacking Team was doing ethical? No, definitely not. For example, they were selling hacking tools to Sudan, whose president is wanted for war crimes and crimes against humanity by the International Criminal Court. Other questionable customers of Hacking Team include the governments of Ethiopia, Egypt, Morocco, Kazakhstan, Azerbaijan, Nigeria and Saudi Arabia. None of these countries are known for their great state of human rights. List of Hacking Team customers: Australia - Australian Federal Police Azerbaijan - Ministry of National Defence Bahrain - Bahrain Chile - Policia de Investigation Colombia - Policia Nacional Intelligencia Cyprus - Cyprus Intelligence Service Czech Republic - UZC Cezch Police Ecuador - Seg. National de intelligencia Egypt - Min. Of Defence Ethiopia - Information Network Security Agency Honduras - Hera Project - NICE Hungary - Special Service National Security Kazakstan - National Security Office Luxembourg - Luxembourg Tax Authority Malaysia - Malaysia Intelligene Mexico - Police Mongolia - Ind. Authoirty Anti Corruption Morocco - Intelligence Agency Nigeria - Bayelsa Government Oman - Excellence Tech group Oman Panama - President Security Office Poland - Central Anticorruption Bureau Russia - Intelligence Kvant Research Saudi Arabia - General Intelligence Presidency Singapore - Infocomm Development Agency South Korea - The Army South Korea Spain - Centro Nacional de Intelligencia Sudan - National Intelligence Security Service Thailand - Thai Police - Dep. Of Correction Tunisia - Tunisia Turkey - Turkish Police USA - FBI Uzbekistan - National Security Service 2) What happens when a company of this kind is a victim of an hacking attack and all of its technology assets are published online?  This was not the first time something like this happened. Last year, Gamma International was hacked. In fact, we believe they were hacked by the same party that hacked Hacking Team. When a company that provides offensive hacking services gets hacked themselves, they are going to have a hard time with their customers. In the case of Hacking Team, their customer list was published. That list included several secretive organizations who would rather not have the world know that they were customers of Hacking Team. For example, executives of Hacking Team probably had to call up the Russian secret intelligence and tell them that there's been a breach and that their customership was now public knowledge. The Hacking Team leak also made at least two zero-exploits public and forced Adobe to put out emergency patches out for Flash. This is not a bad thing by itself: it's good that unknown vulnerabilities that are being exploited become public knowledge. But Adobe probably wasn't happy. Neither was New York Times, as they learned that Hacking Team was using a trojanized iOS app that claimed to be from New York Times to hack iPhones. 3) Is it possible to be protected from malware provided by companies like Hacking Team? Yes. We've added detection for dozens of Hacking Team trojans over the years. Hacking Team had a service where they would update their product to try to avoid signature-based antivirus detections of their programs. However, they would have much harder time in avoiding generic exploit detections. This is demonstrated by their own internal Wiki (which is now public). Let me attach a screenshot from their Wiki showing how we were able to block their exploits with generic behavioural detection: Cheers, Sandra [Image by William Grootonk | Flickr]

July 13, 2015
adobe flash, uninstall, auto-update, click-to-play

3 ways to make Adobe Flash less annoying and/or risky

Time to update Adobe Flash if you use it. So if you do, do it now. Of course, it always feels like time to update Flash. As an internet user, it's become all of our collective part-time job. It's a reminded that while the software is free, your time isn't. This particular update was necessitated by an event you may have heard about. "The flaw was disclosed publicly over the weekend after hackers broke into and posted online hundreds of gigabytes of data from Hacking Team, a controversial Italian company that’s long been accused of helping repressive regimes spy on dissident groups," Brian Krebs explained. The Hacking Team hack raised interesting questions about government surveillance and helped rattle nerves this week as computer systems kept planes out of the air and shut down the New York Stock Exchange -- freak incidents that are completely unrelated, according to disclosures thus far. But it doesn't take events like this remind us Flash exploits are so common that they're part of the business model of criminal operations like the Angler exploit kit. The key to security is always running the latest version of everything. So how do you get yourself out of the business of constantly mitigating Adobe Flash risks? Here are three ways. 1. Quit it. This is Brian Krebs' solution. He's lived without it for more than a month as an experiment. "It is among the most widely used browser plugins, and it requires monthly patching (if not more frequently)," Krebs said. And did he notice life without it? "...not so much." So instead of updating, you can just get rid of it. 2. Auto-update. If you're going to keep it, this is the minimum precaution our Security Advisor Sean Sullivan recommends. This will make sure you're getting all the updates and will prevent you, hopefully, from being tricked into downloading malware posing as an update. So turn those "background upgrades" on. 3. Click-to-play. If you're doing number 2, you probably want to do this too. Click-to-play means Flash elements run when you tell them to. Here's how to do it in all your browsers. Not only does this expose you to fewer risks, it makes the internet less annoying and can make your browser quicker. So why not? So what did you choose? Let us know in the comments. Cheers, Jason  

July 10, 2015
BY