‘Top 10 Most Dangerous Holiday Gifts’ for Cyber Monday 2012

Cyber Monday, the unofficial beginning of the holiday shopping season online, will occur this November 26, 2012, bringing with it throngs of shoppers on the hunt for the best deals and hottest products. As retailers try and get ahead by offering the same specials in store as online, the National Retail Federation is seeing a shift in shoppers skipping the 3am wake up call and long lines in favor of the Internet.

However, this convenience serves only as further motivation for cybercriminals targeting unassuming shoppers as they use search engines to find gifts for their loved ones. Google search results for products often include links to ‘poisoned’ sites, or malicious websites that can infect an unsecured computer or smartphone with viruses, worms and other malware, putting one’s personal and financial information at risk.

The more popular an item is, the more likely it will attract a dangerous search result, which could lead to malware or an unreliable merchant. Here are the products we anticipate will be targeted by cybercriminals this holiday season:

  1. Nintendo Wii U – Available as of this past weekend, the Wii U is expected to be a big seller like the original Wii, which was sold out for nearly an entire year after its launch
  2. Kindle Fire HD – Tablets are all the rage right now, and a $199 sets this 7” to sell big, with some predicting that the Kindle Fire HD will outsell the iPad mini by two to one
  3. iPad mini– This budget-friendly Apple tablet is flying off the shelves, with it taking just minutes for the white iPad Mini to sell out at its initial launch
  4. Hot video game titles – New titles like Halo 4 and COD Black Ops 2 are shattering sales records. In fact, Halo 4 raked in $220 million in its first day on the shelves
  5. Pre-sale tickets for The Hobbit – Scheduled to come out December 18, pre-sale tickets for this great stocking stuffer are already going fast
  6. Windows 8 Certification–With the launch of Microsoft’s Windows 8 software has come a flurry of interest in computer monitors and PCs that boast certification rights
  7. iPhone 5 / Samsung Galaxy 3– It is predicted that this December quarter, Apple will sell 46 million iPhones, and with retailers already advertising Black Friday deals of nearly 75 percent off on the Samsung Galaxy 3, both smartphones will be in demand
  8. Touchscreen gloves – We expect the overall demand for touch devices to drive the sale of related accessories
  9. Furby – Remember this furry little creature that created utter chaos back in the 90’s – well he’s all any kid can talk about for this holiday season
  10. Breaking Dawn DVD– With Breaking Dawn 2 experiencing a $30.4 million opening, the first Breaking Dawn DVD and other Twilight movies will be popular stocking stuffers

Here are three tips from F-Secure to ensure you stay safe while shopping online this Cyber Monday, and throughout the 2012 holiday season:

  • Visit retailers’ websites directly if possible (e.g., www.amazon.com vs. searching ‘Amazon’ on Google)
  • Use Internet security software that features browsing protection (or check links with F-Secure’s free Browsing Protection)
  • Always check a site’s URL before making any purchase (look to make sure you’re at the correct online store and that the page URL begins with https://, which means it’s secure)

For more advice on staying safe online, including our tips for protecting credit card information while online shopping.

F-Secure’s list of the ‘most dangerous gifts’ was compiled based on market analyst data and gift list inclusions. An analysis of Google Trends has shown items on this list are positioned to spike in search volume during this holiday season.



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F-Secure Bringing a totally new Future for the Internet to SLUSH 2015

#SLUSH15 is almost here, and F-Secure’s participating in this year’s event in a big way. There’s going to be a big #smartsecurity announcement about the Internet of Things, as well as a couple of presentations from F-Secure personnel. SLUSH, a well-known exposition for startups in the tech industry, has become a huge international event. Both SLUSH and F-Secure call Helsinki home, so it’s only natural for F-Secure to be an active participant at the annual conference. F-Secure made waves last year after the cybersecurity company hacked the venue’s bathrooms to get people talking about online privacy. Several of the company’s researchers and personnel also put in appearances at last year’s SLUSH, including cyber security expert Mikko Hypponen, and F-Secure’s Executive Vice President, Consumer Security, Samu Konttinen. [youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u93kdtAUn7g&w=560&h=315] [youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HB-qBhWV65s&w=560&h=315] And they’re both back this year! This year, Samu will be giving a keynote address on SLUSH’s Silver Stage. His talk is called “Your home, your rules – The internet of what ifs”, and runs from 11:45am to 12:00pm (Helsinki time) on November 11th. Samu’s enthusiasm for topics related to security and online privacy will give people valuable insights into how IoT devices are creating new security challenges, and what people can do to protect themselves. Mikko will be appearing on SLUSH’s Black Stage at 9:25am (Helsinki time) on November 12th, where he’ll deliver a talk called “The Online Arms Race”. Mikko recently did an interview about this same topic for V3.co.uk, so you can check that out if you want a quick preview about Mikko’s thoughts on this matter. You can follow all of F-Secure’s SLUSH news by following @FSecure_Sense, @FSecure_IoT, and @FSecure on Twitter.

November 10, 2015
Mikko Hypponen, Leo Laporte, Triangulation

5 things Mikko Hyppönen has learned from 25 years of fighting viruses

F-Secure Chief Research Officer Mikko Hyppönen sat down on Monday for a video chat with renowned tech journalist and broadcaster Leo Laporte on Triangulation. Laporte has admired Mikko and F-Secure from afar for more than twenty years, the host explained. So this first talk gave the two IT stalwarts a chance to talk over Mikko's nearly quarter century of work at F-Secure -- which he joined as a coder in 1991 when we were still known as Data Fellows. You can watch the whole interview below or download the audio here: [youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cpg-5NO9oS8] The whole show is worth your time but to get ready to mark Mikko's silver anniversary at F-Secure, we thought we'd pull out some interesting lessons he's learned in more than two decades of tangling with digital threats. Driving a forklift -- Mikko's job before joining F-Secure -- has one big advantage over being an internationally known virus hunter. Once you're done with work for the day, you don't think about your job at all. Mikko told Leo that being Chief Research Officer at a company that protects hundreds of millions of computers doesn't give you that luxury. Some early malware creators went on to some very interesting things. Mikko told Leo about his trip to Pakistan to meet the two brothers who wrote the first PC virus more than 25 years ago, which you can watch below. Basit Farooq Alvi and Amjad Farooq Alvi wrote the program for what they saw as a legitimate purpose -- preventing copyright infringement. Today the brothers along with a third brother run a successful telecommunications business. Robert Tapan Morris -- the creator of Morrisworm the first computer worm -- is a member of the Computer Science faculty at MIT and a partner in Y Combinator, which helps launch tech startups.[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lnedOWfPKT0] His number one security tip? Back up your stuff. "Back up your computer, your iPad, your phone. And back it up so you can access it even if your house burns down." The numbers when it comes to malware are huge. F-Secure Labs receives about 350,000 malware samples a day, seven days a week. "The amount of new detections we build on those samples every day is usually around 10,000... 20 [thousand] on a bad day." Mobile malware isn't a big problem -- except, perhaps, in China -- because Android and iOS are very restrictive. "If you are a programmer, you cannot program on your iPad," Mikko explained. All apps that end up in the Play or App Store have to be approved by Google or Apple respectively. This model, which Mikko compares to the PlayStation and Xbox ecosystems, may be good for security, but it does have some negative consequences. "It's also a little bit sad in the sense that when you have these closed environments, it's sort of like converting the users from producers to consumers." Mikko wrapped up the interview by explaining F-Secure's principles when it comes to protecting and respecting users' data: "We try to sell our products the old-fashioned way. You pay for it with your money, not your privacy." Cheers, Sandra P.S.: For some bonus Mikko, watch a public lecture he gave this week at Estonian Information Technology College. [youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UXSAaVx2EOo&w=560&h=315]

October 15, 2015