Holiday Reminder: Make your pictures last forever

photoThis picture shows two of my best friends cuddled together in a perfect pose.

I love this grainy, quirky picture. I emailed it to my wife. I Facebooked it. I tweeted it.

I love it so much that I brought it to my local photo lab to be blown up so I could frame it and put it on my wall. Unfortunately, the resolution is so low that it’s hardly worth the print, let alone the frame.

The picture was taken with my iPhone, which is handy to catch perfect poses like this. This method is great for capturing digital images to share but they just don’t transfer into the real world all that well.

So here are two quick tips to make sure the irreplaceable images you create this holiday season.

1. Make sure you capture the images you want to turn into actual printed images on photo paper are taken with a high-resolution camera, meaning NOT your smartphone.

2. Keep a backup of all your images–high quality or not–somewhere outside of your home in case damage to your equipment and even your storage disks.

Facebook is probably better than nothing but you probably don’t share every image you want to keep. You can try our Online Backup for free.

Cheers,

Jason

 

 

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June 30, 2016
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How To Prepare Yourself and Your Phone For Juhannus

In Finland, there is this thing called juhannus. A few years ago, our former colleague Hetta described it like this: Well, Midsummer – or juhannus – as it is called in Finnish, is one of the most important public holidays in our calendar. It is celebrated, as you probably guessed, close to the dates of the Summer Solstice, when day is at its longest in the northern hemisphere. Finland being so far up north, the sun doesn’t set on juhannus at all. Considering that in the winter we get the never ending night, it’s no surprise we celebrate the sun not setting. So what do Finns do to celebrate juhannus? I already told you we flock to our summer cottages, but what then? We decorate the cottage with birch branches to celebrate the summer, we stock up on new potatoes which are just now in season and strawberries as well. We fire up the barbecue and eat grilled sausages to our hearts content. We burn bonfires that rival with the unsetting sun. And we get drunk. If that isn't vivid enough, this video may help: [protected-iframe id="f18649f0b62adf8eb1ec638fa5066050-10874323-9129869" info="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fsuomifinland100%2Fvideos%2F1278272918868972%2F&show_text=0&width=560" width="560" height="315" frameborder="0" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no"] And because the celebration is just so... celebratory, it's easy to lose your phone. So here are a few ways to prepare yourself for a party that lasts all night. 1. Don't use 5683 as your passcode. That spells love and it's also one of the first passcodes anyone trying to crack into your phone will try. So use something much more creative -- and use a 6-digit code if you can on your iPhone. You can also encrypt your Android. 2. Write down your IMEI number. If you lose your phone, you're going to need this so make sure you have it written down somewhere safe. 3. Back your content up. This makes your life a lot easier if your party goes too well and it's pretty simple on any iOS device. Just make sure you're using a strong, unique password for your iCloud account. Unfortunately on an Android phone, you'll have to use a third-party app. 4. Maybe just leave it home. Enjoy being with your friends and assume that they'll get the pictures you need to refresh your memory. And while you're out you can give your phone a quick internal "clean" with our free Boost app. [Image by Janne Hellsten | Flickr]

June 22, 2016
twitter, changes

POLL: What Changes To Twitter Would You Like To See?

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