How to Protect Your New PC, Tablet or Phone

mypreciousphoneIf you’re like me, whenever I get new PC, smartphone or tablet, the box is open and the screen is coming to life as soon as I get a chance.

Here are a few suggestions to help you get off to a safe start from the moment you’ve got your system up and running.

PC–Laptop or Desktop

1. Make sure you’re running the most up to date software.
There have likely been several system updates since your hardware was packaged and you opened it. Hopefully your system updated itself or prompted you to update as you installed. But it’s always a good idea to double check. You can do go to Windows Update for your Windows machine. On a Mac, just click on the apple in the top left of your desktop and select, Software Update. You also want to make sure your other software is current and isn’t leaving some hole that can be exploited by an online criminal. You can update each program one-by-one or use our free Health Check.

2. Install security software.
Of course, as company that’s been protecting computers for 25 years, we believe security software including anti-virus is crucial. But don’t just take our word for it. Most, if not all, law enforcement agencies, governments and experts agree that you need security software if you’re planning to use the Internet. So if you aren’t going to use our award-winning Internet Security–which we invite you to try for free–please use another.

3. Choose a backup.Yes, we’re also in the backup business because we believe it’s essential to safe, smart computing. But if you aren’t going to use our Online Backup, you can use an external hard drive, DVDs or some other backup solution. But as our Mikko Hypponen demonstrated in his TED Talk, a reliable backup can save the day.

You may also want to: Uninstall all the programs that came on your PC as promotions if you know you won’t be using them. If you’re super security conscious, you should also disable all your Java plug-ins or make sure they never get enabled–unless you need them.

Smartphone or Tablet

After you’ve registered your accounts and synced your phone when possible, your mobile device is a lot like your PC.

1. Install mobile security.
We also offer Mobile Security for Android that protects your smartphone and tablet from bad apps and scams that are even more tricky on mobile browsers. Some say Android is replacing Windows as the number one target of online criminals–if that happens, it will be the result of too many people not protecting their phones.

Sorry, there’s no iPhone mobile security available yet because Apple isn’t allowing anyone to develop such apps and is relying on keeping bad guys out with its well-policed app store. But if you do not jailbreak your iPhone, it will likely be safe from bad apps.

2. Choose a backup.
You can choose from a variety of backup services for your smartphone, which as you know soon fills up with irreplaceable content. You can also backup by dragging and dropping your content to your backed up PC whenever you dock your phone.  Set up your Android to save your settings regardless of what happens to your device. Just go to Settings > Privacy, and make sure that “Back up my settings” and “Automatic restore” are checked off.

3. Install Anti-Theft.
It just makes sense that you’re more likely to misplace your phone or tablet than your PC. But it’s also simple to track your device and protect your data if it falls out of your hands. We offer free Anti-Theft. Apple offers a Find My iPhone app for free.

4. Stick to Official App Stores.
If you get your apps from the official Google Play or ITunes store, you will likely never deal with a malicious app. Be sure to check user reviews and stick with software that has a proven record.

Enjoy your new toy!

Sandra

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Mikko Hypponen to Talk Privacy at the Mobile World Congress

This year’s Mobile World Congress (MWC) is coming up next week. The annual Barcelona-based tech expo features the latest news in mobile technologies. One of the biggest issues of the past year has enticed our own digital freedom fighter Mikko Hypponen to participate in the event. Hypponen, a well-known advocate of digital freedom, has been defending the Internet and its users from digital threats for almost 25 years. He’s appearing at this year’s MWC on Monday, March 2 for a conference session called “Ensuring User-Centred Privacy in a Connected World”. The panel will discuss and debate different ways to ensure privacy doesn’t become a thing of the past. While Hypponen sees today’s technologies as having immeasurable benefits for us all, he’s become an outspoken critic of what he sees as what’s “going wrong in the online world”. He’s spoken prominently about a range of these issues in the past year, and been interviewed on topics as diverse as new malware and cybersecurity threats, mass surveillance and digital privacy, and the potential abuses of emerging technologies (such as the Internet of Things). The session will feature Hypponen and five other panelists. But, since the event is open to public discussion on Twitter under the #MWC15PRIV hashtag, you can contribute to the conversation. Here’s three talking points to help you get started: Security in a mobile world A recent story broken by The Intercept describes how the American and British governments hacked Gemalto, the largest SIM card manufacturer in the world. In doing so, they obtained the encryption keys that secure mobile phone calls across the globe. You can read a recent blog post about it here if you’re interested in more information about how this event might shape the discussion. Keeping safe online It recently came to light that an adware program called “Superfish” contains a security flaw that allows hackers to impersonate shopping, banking, or other websites. These “man-in-the-middle” attacks can be quite serious and trick people into sharing personal data with criminals. The incident highlights the importance of making sure people can trust their devices. And the fact that Superfish comes pre-installed on notebooks from the world’s largest PC manufacturer makes it worth discussing sooner rather than later. Privacy and the Internet of Things Samsung recently warned people to be aware when discussing personal information in front of their Smart TVs. You can get the details from this blog post, but basically the Smart TVs voice activation technology can apparently listen to what people are saying and even share the information with third parties. As more devices become “smart”, will we have to become smarter about what we say and do around them? The session is scheduled to run from 16:00 – 17:30 (CET), so don’t miss this chance to join the fight for digital freedom at the MWC. [Image by Hubert Burda Media | Flickr]

Feb 27, 2015
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NSA, GCHQ, listening, mobile calls, privacy

Is the NSA listening to your mobile calls? Maybe. Here’s what you can do about it.​

The newest leak from Edward Snowden may be coming at a terrible time for the Obama White House but it's not particularly shocking news to security experts. The Intercept's report about the "Great SIM Heist" reveals American and British spies stole the keys that are "used to protect the privacy of cellphone communications across the globe" from Gemalto, the world's largest manufacturer of SIM cards. It goes on to report that "With these stolen encryption keys, intelligence agencies can monitor mobile communications without seeking or receiving approval from telecom companies and foreign governments," which sidesteps the needs for legal warrants that should be the foundation of ethical law enforcement. While this is certainly troubling and speaks to the agencies wanton regard for privacy and some amateurish procedures being used to transport keys, it likely won't alter the security landscape much. "The best summary is that an already unreliable communication method became even more unreliable," F-Secure Labs Senior Researcher Jarno Niemela, the holder of 20 security-related patents, explained. "Nobody in their right minds would assume GSM  [Global System for Mobile Communications --the digital cellular network used by mobile phones] to be private in the first place," he said. "Phone networks have never been really designed with privacy in mind." Mobile operators are much more concerned with being able to prevent their customers from avoiding billing. While a scope of such a breach does seem huge, Jarno points we're not sure how many of the billions of cards manufactured by Gemalto may be affected. Keys sent to and from operators via without encryption in email or via FTP servers that were not properly secured are almost certainly compromised. But according to The Intercept, GCHQ also penetrated “authentication servers,” which allow it to "decrypt data and voice communications between a targeted individual’s phone and his or her telecom provider’s network" regardless who made the cards. With the cracked keys, users' calls would be vulnerable but likely only in a limited manner. "I am told that these keys only expose the encryption and authentication between the mobile device and the local cell tower," F-Secure Security Advisor David Perry explained. "This means that the NSA or (whoever else) would have to be locally located within radio range of your phone." So could the NSA or GCHQ be listening to your calls without a warrant? Maybe. Here's what you can do about it. Add a layer of encryption of your own to any device you use to communicate. A VPN like our Freedome will protect your data traffic. This would not, however, protect your voice calls. "Maybe it’s time to stop making 'traditional' mobile phones calls," F-Secure Labs Senior Researcher Timo Hirvonen suggests. "Install Freedome, and start making your calls with apps like Signal." [Image by Julian Carvajal | Flickr]

Feb 23, 2015
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Black hole

Are we entering “a digital dark age” or not?

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