Golden Clouds

5 New Year’s Privacy Resolutions for 2013

4821432642_0ecf11cd85You’ve heard it all before.

If you’re on the Internet, you’re probably being monitored. If you’re using a free service, you’re giving up some of your privacy as a payment. If you post something online, you have to assume that it could easily be shared with anyone with an Internet connection.

But that doesn’t mean you have to give up your privacy when you turn on your PC or phone. Here are 5 basic resolutions that will help you make sure that prying eyes can’t get easy access to your data online.

1. I will have a strong, unique password for every account that contains private information.
If you’re super concerned about protecting your privacy, you’ll use unique, unguessable passwords for all your accounts and update them 3-4 times a year. For your most important accounts, this is essential. But for your webmail, banking and Facebook accounts, if you have them, good password hygiene is a must. Here’s a system to create strong passwords you’ll remember.

2. I will go “Friends only” on Facebook.
Sharing your digital life with your friends only won’t guarantee your privacy — ask Randi Zuckerberg. But it will help limit your potential leakage from private to public. Facebook isn’t completely private, of course, ever. But if you want to share everything, Twitter or a blog are probably better options.

3. If I use Gmail, I will turn on two-factor authentication.
If you use your Gmail for business, the extra-layer of security of two-factor authentication is essential. Just make sure that your phone also has some sort of anti-theft or Find My iPhone app installed in case a thief gets ahold of your device. You may also want to clear your Google history, if you’re not interested in that existing.

4. I will log out of any account I’m not using and lock my PC and phone when it’s not in use.
This is just good common sense that I personally ignore on a regular basis. Not in 2013! It reduces how you’ll be tracked, it makes it less likely your own accounts will be used against you.

5. I will keep my software updated.
Our smartphones and PCs are actually quite secure if we keep them patched and protected with update system and security software. This, as you know, can be time consuming, so I’ll update as they come up and for my PC, I’ll use F-Secure’s free Health Check.

Happy 2013,

Jason

[Photo by Triple Tri]

More posts from this topic

nano freedome

A match made in digital heaven

When an enigmatic and groundbreaking artist started making waves on Youtube, the public was simultaneously curious and in awe of this new type of sonic assault, detached from any specific genre, culture or style. nano draws on life experience accumulated in NYC and Japan to create a truly global aesthetic. nano’s music transcends the confines of nationalities and ethnicities, and reflects nano’s “no national borders” motto. Despite being the product of a united and connected world, nano chooses to be shrouded with a veil of mystery and privacy. Like we here at Freedome, nano believes that personal privacy is a choice and the only person to control it should be YOU YOURSELF. We created Freedome because we LOVE the digital and connected world we all live in. We love it so much, that we want to give everyone the tools to enjoy it to the max by not having to worry about the negative sides that come with it. It’s all about choice and keeping control. A lot of your personal information is shared without your approval, and we should be able to share everything you want without fear of your stuff being stolen or used against you. Just like nano, we think that sharing your passions and keeping your privacy are not mutually exclusive. To celebrate our mutual  love for privacy and a connected world, nano has teamed up with Freedome with a special exclusive song, which can be found here. Join our global troop of digital freedom fighters. Your privacy, your choice.

April 22, 2015
BY 
sign license

POLL – How should we deal with harmful license terms?

We blogged last week, once again, about the fact that people fail to read the license terms they approve when installing software. That post was inspired by a Chrome extension that monetized by collecting and selling data about users’ surfing behavior. People found out about this, got mad and called it spyware. Even if the data collection was documented in the privacy policy, and they technically had approved it. But this case is not really the point, it’s just an example of a very common business model on the Internet. The real point is what we should think about this business model. We have been used to free software and services on the net, and there are two major reasons for that. Initially the net was a playground for nerds and almost all services and programs were developed on a hobby or academic basis. The nerds were happy to give them away and all others were happy to get them for free. But businesses run into a problem when they tried to enter the net. There was no reliable payment method. This created the need for compensation models without money. The net of today is to a significant part powered by these moneyless business models. Products using them are often called free, which is incorrect as there usually is some kind of compensation involved. Nowadays we have money-based payment models too, but both our desire to get stuff for free and the moneyless models are still going strong. So what do these moneyless models really mean? Exposing the user to advertising is the best known example. This is a pretty open and honest model. Advertising can’t be hidden as the whole point is to make you see it. But it gets complicated when we start talking targeted advertising. Then someone need to know who you are and what you like, to be able to show you relevant ads. This is where it becomes a privacy issue. Ordinary users have no way to verify what data is collected about them and how it is used. Heck, often they don’t even know under what legislation it is stored and if the vendor respects privacy laws at all. Is this legal? Basically yes. Anyone is free to make agreements that involve submitting private data. But these scenarios can still be problematic in several ways. They may be in conflict with national consumer protection and privacy laws, but the most common complaint is that they aren’t fair. It’s practically impossible for ordinary users to read and understand many pages of legalese for every installed app. And some vendors utilize this by hiding the shady parts of the agreement deep into the mumbo jumbo. This creates a situation where the agreement may give significant rights to the vendor, which the users is totally unaware of. App permissions is nice development that attempts to tackle this problem. Modern operating systems for mobile devices require that apps are granted access to the resources they need. This enables the system to know more about what the app is up to and inform the user. But these rights are just becoming a slightly more advanced version of the license terms. People accept them without thinking about what they mean. This may be legal, but is it right? Personally I think the situation isn’t sustainable and something need to be done. But what? There are several ways to see this problem. What do you think is the best option?   [polldaddy poll=8801974]   The good news is however that you can avoid this problem. You can select to steer clear of “free” offerings and prefer software and services you pay money for. Their business model is simple and transparent, you get stuff and the vendor get money. These vendors do not need to hide scary clauses deep in the agreement document and can instead publish privacy principles like this.   Safe surfing, Micke     Photo by Orin Zebest at Flickr

April 15, 2015
BY