Golden Clouds

5 New Year’s Privacy Resolutions for 2013

4821432642_0ecf11cd85You’ve heard it all before.

If you’re on the Internet, you’re probably being monitored. If you’re using a free service, you’re giving up some of your privacy as a payment. If you post something online, you have to assume that it could easily be shared with anyone with an Internet connection.

But that doesn’t mean you have to give up your privacy when you turn on your PC or phone. Here are 5 basic resolutions that will help you make sure that prying eyes can’t get easy access to your data online.

1. I will have a strong, unique password for every account that contains private information.
If you’re super concerned about protecting your privacy, you’ll use unique, unguessable passwords for all your accounts and update them 3-4 times a year. For your most important accounts, this is essential. But for your webmail, banking and Facebook accounts, if you have them, good password hygiene is a must. Here’s a system to create strong passwords you’ll remember.

2. I will go “Friends only” on Facebook.
Sharing your digital life with your friends only won’t guarantee your privacy — ask Randi Zuckerberg. But it will help limit your potential leakage from private to public. Facebook isn’t completely private, of course, ever. But if you want to share everything, Twitter or a blog are probably better options.

3. If I use Gmail, I will turn on two-factor authentication.
If you use your Gmail for business, the extra-layer of security of two-factor authentication is essential. Just make sure that your phone also has some sort of anti-theft or Find My iPhone app installed in case a thief gets ahold of your device. You may also want to clear your Google history, if you’re not interested in that existing.

4. I will log out of any account I’m not using and lock my PC and phone when it’s not in use.
This is just good common sense that I personally ignore on a regular basis. Not in 2013! It reduces how you’ll be tracked, it makes it less likely your own accounts will be used against you.

5. I will keep my software updated.
Our smartphones and PCs are actually quite secure if we keep them patched and protected with update system and security software. This, as you know, can be time consuming, so I’ll update as they come up and for my PC, I’ll use F-Secure’s free Health Check.

Happy 2013,

Jason

[Photo by Triple Tri]

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Are we entering “a digital dark age” or not?

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