5730523107_969702e067

F-Secure’s Business Protection Impresses Top Analyst

5730523107_969702e067At F-Secure, we not only aim to protect our customers with the best security possible, we also want to do it in the smartest possible way. And here’s some good news: Globally renowned Forrester Research has looked at small business and enterprise client security vendors around the world and found that we’re succeeding in both areas.

We’re proud to be featured in The Forrester Wave™, Endpoint Security Q1 2013 as top-ranked in Strategy. Forrester Research Inc. called us a Strong Performer and gave us the highest score among all vendors for our product roadmap and strategy.

What makes our approach to securing the workplace so appealing is that we don’t see ourselves just offering our clients security software—we take away the worry of securing your office and let our professionals do the job. I recently had a discussion with an end customer of ours in the media industry. He told me that he’s not really interested in what happens in the background and how our products work – he only wants to know that the level of protection is sufficient. And this is not a unique case; we’ve heard the same story from many of our customers.

This simple, breakthrough approach also makes it easier and more affordable to deploy the award-winning security we’ve been providing for more than two decades.

“We think this vision is closely aligned with the bigger climate change where IT all over the world is moving to procuring services rather than products,” Forrester said.

Forrester also praised our rootkit detection and DeepGuard, which we’re especially proud of. Deepguard anticipates threats using heuristical, behavioral and reputation-based technologies.

The other morning when I was commuting to the office in freezing cold weather, I started thinking about layered protection – a term we use to describe the way our protection technology is built. Security is a bit like weather; we forecast it to be able to be prepared. And the colder it gets, the more layers we need to protect us. It is not always that we need all the layers we’ve got at the back of our closet, but we still need to have them come the winter frosts – and the same logic goes for the different layers included in our security products.

Just as clothing companies develop better materials, we continuously develop new technologies to protect our customers

Forrester credited our Labs’ research and gave our Client Security credit for performance, anti-malware detection and customer feedback.

The best news is that they evaluated us even before our new Software Updater tool, which makes it easy to keep your network patched and protected, was released. And that’s a big part of how we try to be smart—by always improving.

Here are some of our tips on securing your business network. And you can find out more about our corporate service portfolio here.

[Photo by Sean MacEntee via Flickr]

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hacking team, hack like a champion, why hacking team matters

3 reasons the Hacking Team story matters from Mikko Hypponen

Hacking is in the news. The U.S. recently disclosed that it was the victim of what may the biggest, most consequential hack ever. We hacked some politicians. And a group called "Hacking Team" was hacked itself. Brian Krebs reports: Last week, hacktivists posted online 400 GB worth of internal emails, documents and other data stolen from Hacking Team, an Italian security firm that has earned the ire of privacy and civil liberties groups for selling spy software to governments worldwide. The disclosure of a zero-day vulnerability for the Adobe Flash Player the team has used has already led to a clear increase of Flash exploits. But this story has a larger significance, involving serious questions about who governs who can buy spyware surveillance software companies and more. Our Chief Research Office Mikko Hyppönen has been following this story and tweeting insights and context. Reporters from around the world have asked him to elaborate on his thoughts. Here's a look at what he's been telling them 1) What is your opinion about the Hacking Team story? This is a big story. Companies like Hacking Team have been coming to the market over the last 10 years as more and more governments wanted to gain offensive online attack capability but did not have the technical know-how to do it by themselves. There's lots of money in this business. Hacking Team customers included intelligence agencies, militaries and law enforcement. Was what Hacking Team was doing legal? Beats me. I'm not a lawyer. Was what Hacking Team was doing ethical? No, definitely not. For example, they were selling hacking tools to Sudan, whose president is wanted for war crimes and crimes against humanity by the International Criminal Court. Other questionable customers of Hacking Team include the governments of Ethiopia, Egypt, Morocco, Kazakhstan, Azerbaijan, Nigeria and Saudi Arabia. None of these countries are known for their great state of human rights. List of Hacking Team customers: Australia - Australian Federal Police Azerbaijan - Ministry of National Defence Bahrain - Bahrain Chile - Policia de Investigation Colombia - Policia Nacional Intelligencia Cyprus - Cyprus Intelligence Service Czech Republic - UZC Cezch Police Ecuador - Seg. National de intelligencia Egypt - Min. Of Defence Ethiopia - Information Network Security Agency Honduras - Hera Project - NICE Hungary - Special Service National Security Kazakstan - National Security Office Luxembourg - Luxembourg Tax Authority Malaysia - Malaysia Intelligene Mexico - Police Mongolia - Ind. Authoirty Anti Corruption Morocco - Intelligence Agency Nigeria - Bayelsa Government Oman - Excellence Tech group Oman Panama - President Security Office Poland - Central Anticorruption Bureau Russia - Intelligence Kvant Research Saudi Arabia - General Intelligence Presidency Singapore - Infocomm Development Agency South Korea - The Army South Korea Spain - Centro Nacional de Intelligencia Sudan - National Intelligence Security Service Thailand - Thai Police - Dep. Of Correction Tunisia - Tunisia Turkey - Turkish Police USA - FBI Uzbekistan - National Security Service 2) What happens when a company of this kind is a victim of an hacking attack and all of its technology assets are published online?  This was not the first time something like this happened. Last year, Gamma International was hacked. In fact, we believe they were hacked by the same party that hacked Hacking Team. When a company that provides offensive hacking services gets hacked themselves, they are going to have a hard time with their customers. In the case of Hacking Team, their customer list was published. That list included several secretive organizations who would rather not have the world know that they were customers of Hacking Team. For example, executives of Hacking Team probably had to call up the Russian secret intelligence and tell them that there's been a breach and that their customership was now public knowledge. The Hacking Team leak also made at least two zero-exploits public and forced Adobe to put out emergency patches out for Flash. This is not a bad thing by itself: it's good that unknown vulnerabilities that are being exploited become public knowledge. But Adobe probably wasn't happy. Neither was New York Times, as they learned that Hacking Team was using a trojanized iOS app that claimed to be from New York Times to hack iPhones. 3) Is it possible to be protected from malware provided by companies like Hacking Team? Yes. We've added detection for dozens of Hacking Team trojans over the years. Hacking Team had a service where they would update their product to try to avoid signature-based antivirus detections of their programs. However, they would have much harder time in avoiding generic exploit detections. This is demonstrated by their own internal Wiki (which is now public). Let me attach a screenshot from their Wiki showing how we were able to block their exploits with generic behavioural detection: Cheers, Sandra [Image by William Grootonk | Flickr]

July 13, 2015
adobe flash, uninstall, auto-update, click-to-play

3 ways to make Adobe Flash less annoying and/or risky

Time to update Adobe Flash if you use it. So if you do, do it now. Of course, it always feels like time to update Flash. As an internet user, it's become all of our collective part-time job. It's a reminded that while the software is free, your time isn't. This particular update was necessitated by an event you may have heard about. "The flaw was disclosed publicly over the weekend after hackers broke into and posted online hundreds of gigabytes of data from Hacking Team, a controversial Italian company that’s long been accused of helping repressive regimes spy on dissident groups," Brian Krebs explained. The Hacking Team hack raised interesting questions about government surveillance and helped rattle nerves this week as computer systems kept planes out of the air and shut down the New York Stock Exchange -- freak incidents that are completely unrelated, according to disclosures thus far. But it doesn't take events like this remind us Flash exploits are so common that they're part of the business model of criminal operations like the Angler exploit kit. The key to security is always running the latest version of everything. So how do you get yourself out of the business of constantly mitigating Adobe Flash risks? Here are three ways. 1. Quit it. This is Brian Krebs' solution. He's lived without it for more than a month as an experiment. "It is among the most widely used browser plugins, and it requires monthly patching (if not more frequently)," Krebs said. And did he notice life without it? "...not so much." So instead of updating, you can just get rid of it. 2. Auto-update. If you're going to keep it, this is the minimum precaution our Security Advisor Sean Sullivan recommends. This will make sure you're getting all the updates and will prevent you, hopefully, from being tricked into downloading malware posing as an update. So turn those "background upgrades" on. 3. Click-to-play. If you're doing number 2, you probably want to do this too. Click-to-play means Flash elements run when you tell them to. Here's how to do it in all your browsers. Not only does this expose you to fewer risks, it makes the internet less annoying and can make your browser quicker. So why not? So what did you choose? Let us know in the comments. Cheers, Jason  

July 10, 2015
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How “the Cloud” Keeps you Safe

“The cloud” is a big thing nowadays. It’s not exactly a new concept, but tech companies are relying on it more and more. Many online services that people enjoy use the cloud to one extent or another, and this includes security software. Cloud computing offers unique security benefits, and F-Secure recently updated F-Secure SAFE to take better advantage of F-Secure’s Security Cloud. It combines cloud-based scanning with F-Secure’s award-winning device-based security technology, giving you a more comprehensive form of protection. Using the cloud to supplement device-based scanning provides immediate, up-to-date information about threats. Device-based scanning, which is the traditional way of identifying malware, examines files against a database saved on the device to determine whether or not a file is malicious. This is a backbone of online protection, so it’s a vital part of F-Secure SAFE. Cloud-based scanning enhances this functionality by checking files against malware information in both the local database found on devices, and a centralized database saved in the cloud. When a new threat is detected by anyone connected to the cloud, it is immediately identified and becomes "known" within the cloud. This ensures that new threats are identified quickly and everyone has immediate access to the information, eliminating the need to update the database on devices when a new threat is discovered. Plus, cloud-based scanning makes actual apps easier to run. This is particularly important on mobile devices, as heavy anti-virus solutions can drain the battery life and other resources of devices. F-Secure SAFE’s Android app has now been updated with an “Ultralight” anti-virus engine. It uses the cloud to take the workload from the devices, and is optimized to scan apps and files with a greater degree of efficiency. Relying on the cloud gives you more battery life, and keeps you safer. The latest F-Secure SAFE update also brings Network Checker to Windows PC users. Network Checker is a device-based version of F-Secure’s popular Router Checker tool. It checks the Internet configuration your computer uses to connect to the Internet. Checking your configuration, as opposed to just your device, helps protect you from attacks that target home network appliances like routers – a threat not detected by traditional anti-virus products. So the cloud is offering people much more than just extra storage space. You can click here to try F-Secure SAFE for a free 30-day trial if you’re interested in learning how F-Secure is using the cloud to help keep people safe. [Image by Perspecsys Photos | Flickr]

June 30, 2015
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