How Much Is a Petabyte? Find Out In The Cloud

The Rapid Expansion of the Cloud Space
The Rapid Expansion of the Cloud Space infographic

From gigabytes to terabytes to petabytes, the cloud is expanding and F-Secure is a leader in with 5 data centers on 3 continents. We secure content for millions of customers around the globe and our cloud is expanding every minute of every day.

We’ll be at the 2013 GSMA Mobile World Congress in Barcelona from February 25 through 28 to show off all of our solutions including F-Secure Content Anywhere, our flagship solution for mobile and broadband operators. F-Secure’s Personal Content Cloud enables consumers to store, sync, access and share their photos, videos, documents and other files safely anywhere, from any device.

68% of consumers are concerned about third parties gaining access to their content due to vulnerabilities in cloud storage providers’ technology, and 42% feel they are losing control of their content.*

That’s why over 100 operators around the world turn to F-Secure for security and content cloud solutions. They know they with us customers private content stays private and protected.

The content we store is scanned only for malware — never for marketing analytics and profiling.

We believe that by providing the safest personal cloud possible, F-Secure will help millions more of the 61% of broadband users who looking forward to being able to store, sync, access and share their digital lives through the cloud.

Cheers,

Sandra

*The F-Secure broadband survey covered web interviews of 6,400 broadband subscribers aged 20–60 years from 14 countries: France, the UK, Germany, Sweden, Finland, Italy, Spain, the Netherlands, Belgium, USA, Canada, Brazil, India and Japan. The survey was completed by GfK, 25 May–1 June 2012.

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Your digital memories – will they vanish or persist?

If you like sailing and tall ships, I can recommend this podcast about Pam Bitterman’s book Sailing to the far horizon. It’s a great story about the last years of the community-operated ship Sofia, covering both a lot of happy sailing and the ship’s sad end in the early eighties. But this is not about hippies on a ship, it’s about how we record and remember our lives. In the podcast Pam tells us how the book was made possible by her parents saving her letters home. Perhaps they had a hunch that this story will be written down one day. Going on to state that e-mails and phone calls wouldn’t have been saved that way. That’s a very interesting point that should make us think. At least it made me think about what we will remember about our lives in, say, twenty years? We collect more info about what we are doing than ever before. We shoot digital pictures all the time and post status updates on Facebook. We are telling the world where we are, what we are doing and what we feel. Maybe in a way that is shallower than letters home, but we sample our lives at a very granular rate. The real question is however how persistent this data is? If we later realize we have experienced something unique enough to write a book about, have our digital life left enough traces to support us? Pam wrote the book about Sofia some twenty years later. A twenty year old paper is still young, but that’s an eternity in the digital world. Will you still be on the same social media service? Do you still have the same account or have you lost it. Does the service even exist? And what about your e-mails, have you saved them? How are your digital photos archived? You may even have cleaned up yourself to fit everything into a cheaper cloud account. Here’s something to keep in mind about retaining your digital life. Realize the value of your personal records. You may fail to see the value in single Facebook posts, but they may still form a valuable wholeness. If you save it you can choose to use it or not in the future. If you lose it you have no choice. Make sure you don’t lose access to your mail, social media and cloud storage accounts. That would force you to start fresh, which usually means data loss. Always register a secondary mail address in the services. That will help you recover if you forget the password. Use a password manager to avoid losing the password in the first place. Redundancy is your friend. Do not store important data in a single location. The ideal strategy is to store your files both on a local computer and in a cloud account. It provides redundancy and also stores data in several geographically separated locations. This is easy with younited because you can set it to automatically back up selected folders. Mail accounts have limited capacity and you can’t keep stuff forever. Don’t delete your correspondence. Check your mail client instead for a function that archives your mail to local storage. Check your social media service for a way to download a copy of your stuff. In Facebook you can currently find this function under Settings / General. It’s good to do this regularly, and you should at least do it if you plan to close your account and go elsewhere. Migrate your data when switching to a new computer or another cloud service. It might be tricky and take some time, but it is worth it. Do not see it as a great opportunity to start fresh and get rid of "old junk". If you are somewhat serious about digital photography, you should get familiar with DAM. That means Digital Asset Management. This book is a good start. Pam did not have a book in mind when she crossed the Pacific. But she was lucky and her parents helped her retain the memories. You will not be that lucky. Don’t expect your friends on Facebook to archive posts for you, you have to do it yourself. You may not think you’ll ever need the stuff, just like Pam couldn’t see the book coming when onboard Sofia. But you never know what plans the future has for you. When you least expect it, you might find yourself in a developing adventure. Make yourself a favor and don’t lose any digital memories. Safe surfing, Micke  

Oct 13, 2014
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What if I lose my smartphone?

Its summer and most of us are active. We are out having fun, attending events and going to new places. Its high season for losing things, like your smartphone for example. I’m not going to repeat the story about tracking services that can lock, wipe and locate your lost phone. That has already been covered. I’m also not going to talk about the black market for stolen phones, and the hilarious cases related to that. But I have started to think about how to manage if I lost my smartphone when away from home. How to recover and how to manage the situation without ruining the holiday? Here’s some of the problems that you may face if the phone is lost. You lose access to your contact register. At a time when you probably need some of the phone numbers badly. You may lose access to all your important communication channels at once, phone calls, mails, chat etc. You can’t look things up on the net and get help that way. You may have stored crucial info in the phone, like the address of your next hotel or electronic tickets. You lose your navigator that could take you where you need to go. Are you using two-factor authentication? That’s a good idea, but it makes your phone even more critical. You need it when logging in from a new location, like a hotel or an Internet cafe for example. And last but not least. Facebook!!! Hmm, yes. We seem to be quite dependent on these small gadgets. Sometimes I wish we could turn back the clock. Trash the gadgets, relax and let the journeys take weeks rather than hours. And ask strangers on the street instead of looking for directions in Google. But I guess that’s impossible so we have to accept that our smartphones are critical devices and mitigate the risk instead. (more…)

Jul 19, 2013
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5 New Year’s Privacy Resolutions for 2013

You've heard it all before. If you're on the Internet, you're probably being monitored. If you're using a free service, you're giving up some of your privacy as a payment. If you post something online, you have to assume that it could easily be shared with anyone with an Internet connection. But that doesn't mean you have to give up your privacy when you turn on your PC or phone. Here are 5 basic resolutions that will help you make sure that prying eyes can't get easy access to your data online. 1. I will have a strong, unique password for every account that contains private information. If you're super concerned about protecting your privacy, you'll use unique, unguessable passwords for all your accounts and update them 3-4 times a year. For your most important accounts, this is essential. But for your webmail, banking and Facebook accounts, if you have them, good password hygiene is a must. Here's a system to create strong passwords you'll remember. 2. I will go "Friends only" on Facebook. Sharing your digital life with your friends only won't guarantee your privacy -- ask Randi Zuckerberg. But it will help limit your potential leakage from private to public. Facebook isn't completely private, of course, ever. But if you want to share everything, Twitter or a blog are probably better options. 3. If I use Gmail, I will turn on two-factor authentication. If you use your Gmail for business, the extra-layer of security of two-factor authentication is essential. Just make sure that your phone also has some sort of anti-theft or Find My iPhone app installed in case a thief gets ahold of your device. You may also want to clear your Google history, if you're not interested in that existing. 4. I will log out of any account I'm not using and lock my PC and phone when it's not in use. This is just good common sense that I personally ignore on a regular basis. Not in 2013! It reduces how you'll be tracked, it makes it less likely your own accounts will be used against you. 5. I will keep my software updated. Our smartphones and PCs are actually quite secure if we keep them patched and protected with update system and security software. This, as you know, can be time consuming, so I'll update as they come up and for my PC, I'll use F-Secure's free Health Check. Happy 2013, Jason [Photo by Triple Tri]

Dec 31, 2012
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