Threat report H2 2012

H2_2012_incidents_calendar

Threat report H2 2012

This time of the year is always interesting. It is the time when Labs looks back on the past half-year to summarize what has happened in the threat landscape. I can proudly announce that the report for H2 2012 has been published and is free for you to download and read!

The report is once again packed with highly interesting reading on the threats that we all face when using the net. And this report is not just a repetition of what has been published in the media. A compilation like this makes it easier to spot the trends and the big picture. Thanks guys for putting it all together! And of course for the continuous research effort that it is based on. (I’m not going to list all the names here, the full list of contributors can be found in the report.)

Here’s some teasers…

Botnets. ZeroAccess was easily the most prevalent botnet we saw in 2012, with infections most visible in France, United States and Sweden. It is also one of the most actively developed and perhaps the most profitable botnet of last year. Read more about ZeroAccess and botnets in general at page 15 – 20.

Exploits. Java was the main target for most of the exploit-based attacks we saw during the past half year. This is aptly demonstrated in the statistics for the top 10 most prevalent detections recorded by our cloud lookup systems. Learn more about exploits at page 25-27.

Banking trojans. With regards to banking-trojans, a botnet known as Zeus—which is also the name for the malware used to infect the user’s machines—is the main story for 2012. Browse to page 21-24 to read how the traditional way to rob a bank has become hopelessly old-fashioned.

The web. Common sense is still important when surfing, but it is becoming increasingly difficult to spot the dangerous places. Ad-networks are integrated in an increasing number of sites and can distribute malware through web portals that should be trustworthy. More about the web’s dangerous places at page 28-31.

Mobile devices. Did you know that there is malware on all commonly used mobile platforms? But Android has the questionable honor to lead the pack, and the others are far behind. The full story is on page 35-37.

The threat report covers all this and a lot more. Why not make sure that you are up to date on the threat scenario by continuing to the report. It is highly recommended reading.

Micke

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