F-Secure helps customers enjoy their data when, where and how they want it

208640498_bc8f77cb87Content Anywhere from F-Secure enables operators to offer branded services to store and retrieve their data and content easily, flexibly and securely – giving expanded market reach, increased ARPU, and additional branding opportunities.

Your customers win because they can store, sync, share and access their photos, videos, documents and other data securely, from any device. They get a consistent user experience across their digital life with security based on F-Secure’s proven technology. You win through additional revenue opportunities and association of your brand.

Consumers are adopt more and more devices for daily use – from smart phones to tablets to laptops and pcs. And they want those devices to share and have access to more and more content – from simple documents to photos and videos and more. Research shows that consumers want personal cloud services and that they want to know their photos, videos, documents, and data are safe, secure, and under their control. According to our research* 68 percent of consumers are concerned about third parties gaining access to their content due to vulnerabilities in cloud storage providers’ technology, and 42 percent feel they are losing control of their content. Yet, these are issues that should be of concern for everyone!

“Content Anywhere is the world’s safest cloud,” says Timo Laaksonen, Vice President, Content Cloud at F-Secure. “We are a security company with over two decades of security expertise. Our cloud is built and managed according to proven security processes. It’s not simply an afterthought like some other services out there.”

Designed with platform openness, data portability and data sovereignty in mind, Content Anywhere can easily be configured under your brand’s look & feel, while the service platform integrates directly to your authentication, provisioning and billing systems. Further VAS services can also be launched on the platform with ease – giving you the opportunity to provide your customers with access to their precious content from any device with confidence it’s private and secure because it is offered from a brand they trust: yours.

*The F-Secure broadband survey covered web interviews of 6,400 broadband subscribers aged 20–60 years from 14 countries: France, the UK, Germany, Sweden, Finland, Italy, Spain, the Netherlands, Belgium, USA, Canada, Brazil, India and Japan. The survey was completed by GfK, 25 May–1 June 2012.

[Image by ^riza^ via Flickr]

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What was PC technology like when each new Star Wars debuted?

When George Lucas' Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope hit theaters in May 25, 1977 the vision of a world that existed a "long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away" was startlingly new. The film opens with a massive Imperial Star Destroyer chasing a rebel ship and features routine space travel and battles suggestive of both of the age of King Arthur and a high-tech future, as depicted by visual effects pioneers Industrial Light & Magic. It also features a wire-frame animation (replicated below) of the Death Star, one of the first uses of computer animation ever to make it into a motion picture. [youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lVMnwd4mZlA] Less than a month later, history was made in the personal computer industry when Apple released the Apple II on June 10, 1977. At $1,298 -- which is just over $5,000 in today's U.S. dollars -- the machine that operated using Applesoft BASIC would become one of the first microcomputers to win widespread adoption, eventually expanding personal computing beyond hobbyists by offering business applications like VisiCalc, the first computer spreadsheet program for PCs. By the time Apple phased out the II series in 1993 between 5 and 6 million units had been sold. During 1999, the year when Lucas launched his first of the prequels Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace, more than 114 million PCs were sold and the explosion of the World Wide Web had sped up widespread adoption of internet-connected computers. EverQuest -- the second massively multi-player online game after Ultima Online and the first with a 3-D engine -- was released on March 16, 1999 and within months more than two-hundred thousand players had subscribed. On May 19th, Phantom Menace hit theaters with only one scene that wasn't altered by visual effects. It was the first Star Wars film to feature fully computer generated characters including Jar Jar Binks, so maybe that wasn't a great idea. That year Apple released its its iMac computers in a variety of colors, Intel released its Pentium III and the computer virus Melissa -- the first able to spread itself through email -- became the fastest spreading malware ever and hit 250,000 PCs worldwide. The Mobile Web also debuted in Japan via the i-mode networking standard. According to the Computer History Museum Timeline of Computer History, it offered "web access, e-mail, mobile payments, streaming video, and many other features that the rest of the world won't see for nearly another decade." Free PC gave away 10,000 Compaq computers, one of many companies that offered hardware or Internet access in exchange for viewing ads. Many of these companies were bankrupt by December of that year. This is what a 1999-era Compaq running Windows 98 looks like: [youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ii51iSCnE0Q] The full trailer of Star Wars Episode VII: The Force Awakens debuted in October of 2015. [youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sGbxmsDFVnE] This follows only six months after Apple introduced its Apple Watch wearable device. The number of computers sold each year -- when you combine personal computers with smartphones and tablets -- now numbers in the billions with more than a billion devices powered by Google's Android operating system alone being sold each year. The largest PC maker in the world Lenovo sold 58 million units in 2014. The director of The Force Awakens J.J. Abrams had no input whatsoever from its creator George Lucas who sold to the franchise to Disney. But Abrams studiously sought to connect the new film to the original trilogy. He did this both by working with the writer of Episode IV: The Empire Strikes Back Lawrence Kasdan and through effects that focused on continuity with the movie's predecessors, with only a judicious use of computer generated images. [Apple II image by Narnars0]

December 18, 2015
BY 
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Advertising – to block or not to block? (Poll)

I have become pretty immune to advertising on the net. The brain develops an algorithm to locate the relevant content and filter out the junk around it. Frankly speaking, ask me about what ads there were on the page I just visited, and I have no clue. And I believe that’s true for many of us. Except that our internal ad-blockers aren’t perfect. The advertising may still affect us unconsciously. This issue has been in the headlines a lot since Apple introduced a simple way to implement ad-blocking on iPhones and iPads. Many took advantage of the opportunity and released new tools, among them the excellent F-Secure ADBLOCKER. And many media providers got upset as this development will no doubt increase the usage of ad blocking, and thus reduce advertising revenues. Some newspapers are already attempting to prevent users with ad-blockers from using their site at all. And some publishers admit that advertising has gone too far and they had it coming. So let’s take a look at the pros and cons of advertising. First the pros. Advertisers pay for your “free” stuff. It makes it possible to get a lot of excellent services and content without paying money. Instead you pay by exposing yourself to ads and letting companies profile you for targeted advertising. Some may actually find ads, especially well targeted ads, useful. They may contain special offers and campaign codes that are of true value to you. Advertising can be entertaining. And then the longer list, the cons. Advertising often disturbs your user experience. You have to locate the beef among glossy blinking ads. And you may even have to dodge pop-ups to actually see your content. Advertising may lure you to make more, often unnecessary, purchases. That’s basically the objective of advertising. Advertising often tries to trick you into opening the advertiser’s site. For example by mimicking a Next- or Download- button in the ad. Advertising may show content that is unsuitable for the viewer. Advertising can be a way to deliver malware. Ads are delivered from separate servers. A compromised ad server may show infected ads on sites with a good reputation. I.e. in places where you don’t expect to run into malware. Advertising will consume bandwidth and make pages load more slowly. This can cost you real money depending on your data plan. Advertising is the main reason to track you. Many companies attempt to profile you as accurately as possible to make targeted advertising more effective. Good targeted advertising may not be evil in itself, but misuse of the collected data is a real threat. It seems likes the cons win hands-down. But there is one argument in favor of advertisement that deserves some more attention. The publishers who take an aggressive approach against ad-blocking typically say that blocking ads is like taking a free ride. You try to benefit from free content without paying the price. And this is an argument that can’t be dismissed just like that. Remember that advertising is the engine for a significant part of the net. Imagine that 100% of the users would use 100% effective ad-blockers. What would our virtual world look like in that case? I don’t know, but it would definitively be a different world. But on the other hand, it’s easy to find sites where advertising definitively has gone overboard. So it is understandable if the advertisers receive little sympathy for their fight against ad-blocking. This is yet another question without any clear and simple answers. So let’s pass it to you, dear readers. What do you think about advertising on the web? [polldaddy poll=9139628]   [caption id="attachment_8591" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Article trying to defend advertising. The beef is there under the ad. ;)[/caption]   Safe surfing, Micke   Image: iPhone and www.streamingmedia.com screenshots  

October 22, 2015
BY 
Mikko Hypponen and Allen Scott receiving the award from Helen Anderson of Accenture.

F-Secure SAFE named Best Security at the ISPA Awards 2015

The Internet Service Provider Association (ISPA) held the 17th UK Internet industry awards on Thursday 2nd July at The Brewery in the City of London. The award ceremony was opened by none other than F-Secure’s chief research officer and world-renowned security expert, Mikko Hypponen. F-Secure’s comprehensive security solution SAFE won the inaugural Security Award. SAFE was shortlisted alongside Memset, Censorset, Fido Net and Talk Straight. SAFE is F-Secure’s flagship internet security product which works across PCs, Macs, smartphones and tablets. It is the first consumer security service that allows complete management of family security across multiple devices from a simple, intuitive and self-service portal. It uses award-winning cloud-based scanning engines to ensure users stay safe online. SAFE is more than just an anti-virus offering, as it also protects online banking and shopping through its Banking Protection feature and, for mobiles, it provides privacy features, as well as lock, wipe, locate and alarm. For families, there are advanced parental control settings that allows parents to define how much internet access children have, as well as which websites and apps they may use. ISPAs panel judges cited the flexibility, portability and range of features, including banking, identity and virus protection SAFE offers makes it an excellent choice for ISPs and their customers. F-Secure UK’s managing director Allen Scott said of the win, “As you can imagine, we are thrilled to have been selected by the judges for this award. We work closely with ISPs like Virgin Media, TalkTalk and Vodafone to provide our security products to their broadband subscribers. Keeping safe online is an important issue and this award is testament to the caliber of our product and the extra mile the team goes.” Other big winners of the evening were the Rt. Hon. David Davis MP and Tom Watson MP - both won the F-Secure sponsored Internet Hero Award for their legal challenge to guarantee the privacy of their constituents and their effort to raise the level of debate in Parliament on communications data issues. While, the Home Secretary, Rt. Hon. Theresa May MP won the Internet Villain award for trying to undermine the basic constitution of the publics freedom to privacy, with the aim of implementing the Snooper’s Charter.  

September 10, 2015