Hear Mikko Unplugged – Don’t Miss our Live Lab Webinar!

mikko

UPDATE: You can now watch a recording of this event here.

Want to hear our cyber security rock star/guru Mikko Hypponen, live? Our upcoming free lab webinar is your chance! He’ll speak about the hot topics in the world of fighting malware. You’ll even have an opportunity to ask him your most burning questions.

Topics Mikko will cover:

  • Mobile Threat Report – Be the first to know what’s in our brand-new report, coming out the same day. Hear the latest on Android and Symbian, mobile banking Trojans and more – and get Mikko’s perspective.
  • Click Fraud Business – Advertising is big business. Click-fraud is complex and is an innovative crime. What does it involve and how did it get this way?
  • Fighting bots on your computers and your phone – Windows-based botnets are a major problem. What can we do to fight them? And how can we prevent our phones from becoming the next battleground?
  • Apple, FB hacks and its implications for the rest of the world – Facebook and Apple employees were compromised. How did it happen? What are the issues and who else may be affected? And what does it mean for the rest of us?

Hear it straight from the labs, live and unplugged – click here to sign up now.

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Cyber Espionage

Getting Cozy with Cyber Espionage

Espionage – it’s not just for James Bond type spies anymore. Cyber espionage is becoming an increasingly important part of global affairs, and a threat that companies and organizations handling large amounts of sensitive data are now faced with. Institutions like these are tempting targets because of the data they work with, and so attacks designed to steal data or manipulate them can give attackers significant advantages in various social, political and industrial theaters. F-Secure Labs’ latest malware analysis focuses on CozyDuke – an Advanced Persistent Threat (APT) toolkit that uses combinations of tactics and malware to compromise and steal information from its targets. The analysis links it to other APTs responsible for a number of high-profile acts of espionage, including attacks against NATO and a number of European government agencies. CozyDuke utilizes much of the same infrastructure as the platforms used in these attacks, effectively linking these different campaigns to the same technology. “All of these threats are related to one another and share resources, but they’re built a little bit differently to make them more effective against particular targets”, says F-Secure Security Advisor Sean Sullivan. “The interesting thing about CozyDuke is that it’s being used against a more diverse range of targets. Many of its targets are still Western governments and institutions, but we’re also seeing it being used against targets based in Asia, which is a notable observation to make”. CozyDuke and its associates are believed to originate from Russia. The attackers establish a beachhead in an organization by tricking employees into doing something such as clicking a link in an e-mail that distracts users with a decoy file (like a PDF or a video), allowing CozyDuke to infect systems without being noticed. Attackers can then perform a variety of tasks by using different payloads compatible with CozyDuke, and this can let them gather passwords and other sensitive information, remotely execute commands, or intercept confidential communications. Just because threats like CozyDuke target organizations rather than individual citizens doesn’t mean that they don’t put regular people at risk. Government organizations, for example, handle large amounts of data about regular people. Attackers can use CozyDuke and other types of malware to steal data from these organizations, and then use what they learn about people for future attacks, or even sell it to cyber criminals. The white paper, penned by F-Secure Threat Intelligence Analyst Artturi Lehtiö, is free and available for download from F-Secure’s website.  [ Image by Andrew Becraft | Flickr ]

May 4, 2015
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Patriot Act Government Surveillance Nothing to Hide

The one question that could change the privacy debate

How important is it to ask the right question? Our Security Advisor Sean Sullivan thinks it's so important that it can either help or hurt your cause. Most anyone who has debated the issues of government surveillance and online tracking by corporations has likely faced someone who dismisses concerns with "I don't have anything to hide." This is apparently a very popular sentiment. 83 percent of respondents in the United Kingdom answered "No" to the question "Do you have anything to hide?" in a new F-Secure survey. "You might as well be asking people – are you a dishonest person?" Sean wrote in our latest Threat Report (like goes to PDF). "The question is emotionally charged and so of course people react to it in a defensive manner – I think it is perfectly natural that 83% of people said no." Sean suggested another question that reframes the debate: "Would you want to share everything about your life with everyone everywhere, all the time, forever?" Think about just your Google Search history. Seriously, take a look at it -- here's how you can see it (and delete it). "And my prediction was proven correct – 89% of respondents did not want to be exhibitionists," he wrote. Both questions, he notes, at the core ask, "Do you think privacy is important?" One does it in a way that's accusatory. The other in a way that's explanatory. Sean suggests that we all have things in our past we'd rather forget and asking the right question can get people to see that quite quickly. There's reason to pessimistic about privacy given that there has been substantial change in U.S. government policy since the Snowden revelations began. But even that may change soon with bipartisan revisions to the the law that began legalized mass surveillance. This imperfect attempt to limit the NSA's bulk collection is a promising start of a major shift away from methods that have done more to stifle digital freedom than to achieve the unachievable goal of creating a world without threats, if it's indeed just a start. Maybe we're starting to ask the right questions. [Image by Ashleigh Nushawg | Flickr]

May 1, 2015
BY