android

Mobile Threat Report Q4 2012: 96% of all Mobile Malware written at the end of 2012 targets Android

mobile_report_q4_2012F-Secure Labs Mobile Threat Report for Q4 2013 is out and it’s clear that the most popular smartphone operating system is also the leading target for online criminals.

94% of all mobile malware the F-Secure Response Labs analyzed in Q4  targets Google’s Android platform.

You can get the whole report here.

Here’s what the growth of mobile mobile malware looks like over 2012.

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As Android threats have grown, Symbian malware has nearly disappeared. Why? Symbian which used to be the world’s most popular mobile OS is disappearing. Nokia phones are increasingly moving to Windows Phone, which — as you may have noticed — is attracting no threats. The world’s second most popular mobile platform Apple’s  iOS for iPhones and iPads also had no threats found in 2012.

Why the difference? It comes down to platform openness and App store security.

How can you protect your phone from these threats?

1.  Stick to the official app stores.
Apple and Microsoft have strict guidelines for their app stores and Google’s Play store is increasingly adopting restrictions that prevent bad apps from ever showing up. If you only get apps in the official stores, your chances of getting a bad app are almost zero.

2. Check out reviews.
Malicious apps are often weeded out by active users who rate and review software. If an app doesn’t have positive feedback and a lot of it, you probably don’t want to be the one who tests it out.

3. Keep your phone’s software updated.
Your smartphone is a mini PC with the same software issues that your PC has including software that continually needs to be updated. This may require some help from your carrier depending on your phone —  but the basic rule is: The more current, the better.

4. Be very careful when giving your mobile number out.

The main thing to keep in mind is that while your family and friends may want to pry on your phone to see what you’re up to, the most likely reason a criminal will be targeting you is pretty obvious.

You guessed it: FOR THE MONEY.

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Cheers,

Jason

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Could the Sony and Hacking Team hacks have been detected sooner?

Hacks in the Headlines: Two Huge Breaches That Could Have Been Detected

The Sony hack of late 2014 sent shock waves through Hollywood that rippled out into the rest of the world for months. The ironic hack of the dubious surveillance software company Hacking Team last summer showed no one is immune to a data breach - not even a company that specializes in breaking into systems. After a big hack, some of the first questions asked are how the attacker got in, and whether it could have been prevented. But today we're asking a different question: whether, once the attacker was already in the network, the breach could have been detected. And stopped. Here's why: Advanced attacks like the ones that hit Sony and Hacking Team are carried out by highly skilled attackers who specifically target a certain organization. Preventive measures block the great majority of threats out there, but advanced attackers know how to get around a company's defenses. The better preventive security a company has in place, the harder it will be to get in…but the most highly skilled, highly motivated attackers will still find a way in somehow. That's where detection comes in. Thinking like an attacker If an attacker does get through a company's defensive walls, it's critical to be able detect their presence as early as possible, to limit the damage they can do. There has been no official confirmation of when Sony's actual breach first took place, but some reports say the company had been breached for a year before the attackers froze up Sony's systems and began leaking volumes of juicy info about the studio's inner workings. That's a long time for someone to be roaming around in a network, harvesting data. So how does one detect an attacker inside a network? By thinking like an attacker. And thinking like an attacker requires having a thorough knowledge of how attackers work, to be able to spot their telltale traces and distinguish them from legitimate users. Advanced or APT (Advanced Persistent Threat) attacks differ depending on the situation and the goals of the attacker, but in general their attacks tend to follow a pattern. Once they've chosen a target company and performed reconnaissance to find out more about the company and how to best compromise it, their attacks generally cover the following phases: 1. Gain a foothold. The first step is to infect a machine within the organization. This is typically done by exploiting software vulnerabilities on servers or endpoints, or by using social engineering tactics such as phishing, spear-phishing, watering holes, or man-in-the-middle attacks. 2. Achieve persistence. The initial step must also perform some action that lets the attacker access the system later at will. This means a persistent component that creates a backdoor the attacker can re-enter through later. 3. Perform network reconnaissance. Gather information about the initial compromised system and the whole network to figure out where and how to advance in the network. 4. Lateral movement. Gain access to further systems as needed, depending on what the goal of the attack is. Steps 2-4 are then repeated as needed to gain access to the target data or system. 5. Collect target data. Identify and collect files, credentials, emails, and other forms of intercepted communications. 6. Exfiltrate target data. Copy data to the attackers via network. Steps 5 and 6 can also happen in small increments over time. In some cases these steps are augmented with sabotaging data or systems. 7. Cover tracks. Evidence of what was done and how it was done is easily erased by deleting and modifying logs and file access times. This can happen throughout the attack, not just at the end. 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