android

Mobile Threat Report Q4 2012: 96% of all Mobile Malware written at the end of 2012 targets Android

mobile_report_q4_2012F-Secure Labs Mobile Threat Report for Q4 2013 is out and it’s clear that the most popular smartphone operating system is also the leading target for online criminals.

94% of all mobile malware the F-Secure Response Labs analyzed in Q4  targets Google’s Android platform.

You can get the whole report here.

Here’s what the growth of mobile mobile malware looks like over 2012.

variants

As Android threats have grown, Symbian malware has nearly disappeared. Why? Symbian which used to be the world’s most popular mobile OS is disappearing. Nokia phones are increasingly moving to Windows Phone, which — as you may have noticed — is attracting no threats. The world’s second most popular mobile platform Apple’s  iOS for iPhones and iPads also had no threats found in 2012.

Why the difference? It comes down to platform openness and App store security.

How can you protect your phone from these threats?

1.  Stick to the official app stores.
Apple and Microsoft have strict guidelines for their app stores and Google’s Play store is increasingly adopting restrictions that prevent bad apps from ever showing up. If you only get apps in the official stores, your chances of getting a bad app are almost zero.

2. Check out reviews.
Malicious apps are often weeded out by active users who rate and review software. If an app doesn’t have positive feedback and a lot of it, you probably don’t want to be the one who tests it out.

3. Keep your phone’s software updated.
Your smartphone is a mini PC with the same software issues that your PC has including software that continually needs to be updated. This may require some help from your carrier depending on your phone —  but the basic rule is: The more current, the better.

4. Be very careful when giving your mobile number out.

The main thing to keep in mind is that while your family and friends may want to pry on your phone to see what you’re up to, the most likely reason a criminal will be targeting you is pretty obvious.

You guessed it: FOR THE MONEY.

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Cheers,

Jason

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