One picture can tell more than you think

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BoatOne of my big passions is photography. I’m quite old-school as I mostly use a big DSLR, post-process my shots on the PC and upload some keepers to Flickr. But I’m also using my mobile phone camera more and more. Nothing beats the convenience of snapping a shot and being able to upload in one sweep. Some people, like me, just have a mental barrier to overcome, the technical perfectionism. A shot can be fun and interesting even if you haven’t spent hours tweaking it. I’m working on that…

Sharing photos on the net is fun, but did you know how much a single picture can tell? I’m not talking about the traditional “more than 1000 words” here. I’m talking about metadata. This is invisible data that describes the content and is embedded in the picture file. This is some of the data that a photo can contain:

  • Date and time when the picture is taken
  • Photographic parameters like lens, aperture and exposure time
  • Geographical position from a GPS-device
  • Information about the device that took the picture, brand, model, serial number, etc.
  • Name and contact information of the device’s owner
  • Information about the photo’s copyright owner and rights to use the photo
  • A lot of other info that professionals and serious amateurs can use to manage large photo collections.

All this data does really provide a lot of added value. You can automatically have shots sorted by capture time, you can plot photo locations on maps, find all shots taken with a certain camera or lens, and so on. The possibilities are almost endless. But metadata is like all other great things, it can be used and misused. The downside is naturally privacy.

I did a quick test with my Nokia Lumia, which is a Windows Phone -device. It turned out that its camera embeds the date and time, photographic parameters and the GPS-location automatically. But data about the owner is not included. This data is also kept when using all share-options that I currently have available; mail, Flickr, Facebook, SkyDrive and DropBox. There’s no setting anywhere that would control this behavior. In theory, I could reveal my exact location every time I upload a photo.

But this is not the full story. The service that you upload to can also decide how to process metadata. Facebook strips it altogether. This design was probably implemented to save storage space, but has a positive side-effect on privacy. Photographers who are interested in the photo parameters are however not happy. Flickr uses a different strategy. Metadata is extracted and used in the interface. You can decide if you want it to be showed or not. Users can also download smaller picture files without metadata, or the original with all data intact, if you choose to allow it. It’s quite natural that Flickr is more advanced as it is a site focusing on photo sharing.

So what should I do about this?

  • What data you share depend on many factors, so you really have to find out yourself. Go to the site where your pictures are shared. Download a picture of yours and examine its metadata. This can be done by opening the file’s properties or with some special tool. Photo editing software usually let you examine and manipulate the metadata. Opanda IExif is a free tool for Windows. Think about what data you can see and if you think it is a privacy problem.
  • If you share photos from your mobile device, there may not be much you can do to manage metadata. Look for settings controlling metadata in the camera program and all apps used when sharing. You may also look for alternative apps with better controls. If nothing else helps, you may have to accept the situation, restrict your sharing or disable the GPS if position info is your concern.
  • Old-school folks who share through a computer have much more options. Most workflow programs have options that control what metadata you embed in the final files. There’s also many tools available that can strip metadata from files before you upload. I already mentioned one above.

To summarize. You do not necessary have a privacy problem with metadata in photos you share. It depends on many factors. The device you take photos with, the software you use to process and transmit the shots and finally the site where they are published. And naturally your own privacy expectation, what data are you ready to share? But the most important point is to be on top of this yourself. Don’t leave it to chance. Check what you share and make up your mind if it’s OK or not.

An exercise for you. Download the photo file in this post and check what kind of metadata you can find in it. It’s taken straight from my workflow program on the PC, no data removed.

Safe surfing,
Micke

PS. Also keep this in mind if you feel tempted to cheat about when and where a shot is taken. You are unlikely to get away with it if you have photo-savvy friends.

Photo by Micke-fi @ Flickr

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