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Mobile Threat Report Q1 2013 — Android becomes more and more like Windows

mobile_report_q1_2013Our latest Mobile Threat Report is out and the findings show that the Android malware ecosystem is more and more resembling the Windows ecosystem.

New mobile threat families and variants rose by 49% from last quarter, from 100 to 149. 136, or 91.3% of these were Android and 13, or 8.7% Symbian. Q1 2013 numbers are more than double that of a year ago in Q1 2012.

While the “walled-gardens” of the iOS and Windows Phone, where apps require approval before sale, have prevented malware threats to develop for the iPhone or Nokia models running those systems, Android threats are increasing and becoming more likely to affect average users.

“I’ll put it this way: Until now, I haven’t worried about my mother with her Android because she’s not into apps,” F-Secure Security Advisor Sean Sullivan said. “Now I have reason to worry because with cases like Stels, Android malware is also being distributed via spam, and my mother checks her email from her phone.”

You can get the entire report here and as you read through it, listen to our Chief Research Officer Mikko Hypponen and Sean Sullivan walk through the report in this exclusive preview. (Sorry, there is a odd echo for the first few minutes of the recording.)

Here’s a look at profit-motivated threats. Is anyone surprised that mobile malware authors are mostly motivated by money?
fig2_profit_motivated_threats

As far as the types of threats our Labs is seeing, Trojans continue to dominate:

fig3_threats_by_type

We protect your mobile devices from all common threats. Get F-Secure Mobile Security free for 30 days or download it at Google Play .

Cheers,Jason

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Only 10% protected – Interesting study on travelers’ security habits

Kaisu who is working for us is also studying tourism. Her paper on knowledge of and behavior related to information security amongst young travelers was released in May, and is very interesting reading. The world is getting smaller. We travel more and more, and now we can stay online even when travelling. Using IT-services in unknown environments does however introduce new security risks. Kaisu wanted to find out how aware young travelers are of those risks, and what they do to mitigate them. The study contains many interesting facts. Practically all, 95,7%, are carrying a smartphone when travelling. One third is carrying a laptop and one in four a tablet. The most commonly used apps and services are taking pictures, using social networks, communication apps and e-mail, which all are used by about 90% of the travelers. Surfing the web follows close behind at 72%. But I’m not going to repeat it all here. The full story is in the paper. What I find most interesting is however what the report doesn’t state. Everybody is carrying a smartphone and snapping pictures, using social media, surfing the web and communicating. Doesn’t sound too exotic, right? That’s what we do in our everyday life too, not just when travelling. The study does unfortunately not examine the participants’ behavior at home. But I dare to assume that it is quite similar. And I find that to be one of the most valuable findings. Traveling is no longer preventing us from using IT pretty much as we do in our everyday life. I remember when I was a kid long, long ago. This was even before invention of the cellphone. There used to be announcements on the radio in the summer: “Mr. and Mrs. Müller from Germany traveling by car in Lapland. Please contact your son Hans urgently.” Sounds really weird for us who have Messenger, WhatsApp, Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat and Skype installed on our smartphones. There was a time when travelling meant taking a break in your social life. Not anymore. Our social life is today to an increasing extent handled through electronic services. And those services goes with us when travelling, as Kaisu’s study shows. So you have access to the same messaging channels no matter where you are on this small planet. But they all require a data connection, and this is often the main challenge. There are basically two ways to get the data flowing when abroad. You can use data roaming through the cellphone’s ordinary data connection. But that is often too expensive to be feasible, so WiFi offers a good and cheap alternative. Hunting for free WiFi has probably taken the top place on the list of travelers’ concerns, leaving pickpockets and getting burnt in the sun behind. Another conclusion from Kaisu’s study is that travelers have overcome this obstacle, either with data roaming or WiFi. The high usage rates for common services is a clear indication of that. But how do they protect themselves when connecting to exotic networks? About 10% are using a VPN and about 20% say they avoid public WiFi. That leaves us with over 70% who are doing something else, or doing nothing. Some of them are using data roaming, but I’m afraid most of them just use whatever WiFi is available, either ignoring the risks or being totally unaware. That’s not too smart. Connecting to a malicious WiFi network can expose you to eavesdropping, malware attacks, phishing and a handful other nasty tricks. It’s amazing that only 10% of the respondents have found the simple and obvious solution, a VPN. It stands for Virtual Private Network and creates a protected “tunnel” for your data through the potentially harmful free networks. Sounds too nerdy? No, it’s really easy. Just check out Freedome. It’s the super-simple way to be among the smart 10%.   Safe surfing, Micke   PS. I recently let go of my old beloved Nokia Lumia. Why? Mainly because I couldn’t use Freedome on it, and I really want the freedom it gives me while abroad.   Image by Moyan Brenn  

August 24, 2015
BY 
Android

Android’s Stagefright bug – phone vendors taken with their pants down

You have all heard the classic mantra of computer security: use common sense, patch your system and install antivirus. That is still excellent advice, but the world is changing. We used to repeat that mantra over and over to the end users. Now we are entering a new era where we have to stress the importance of updates to manufacturers. We did recently write about how Chrysler reacted fairly quickly to stop Jeeps from being controlled remotely. They made a new firmware version for the vehicles, but didn’t have a good channel to distribute the update. Stagefright on Android demonstrates a similar problem, but potentially far more widespread. Let’s first take a look at Stagefright. What is it really? Stagefright is the name of a module deep inside the Android system. This module is responsible for interpreting video files and playing them on the device. The Stagefright bug is a vulnerability that allows and attacker to take over the system with specially crafted video content. Stagefright is used to automatically create previews of content received through many channels. This is what makes the Stagefright bug really bad. Anyone who can send you a message containing video can potentially break into your Android device without any actions from you. You can use common sense and not open fishy mail attachments, but that doesn’t work here. Stagefright takes a look at inbound content automatically in many cases so common sense won't help. Even worse. There’s not much we can do about it, except wait for a patch from the operator or phone vendor. And many users will be waiting in vain. This is because of how the Android system is developed and licensed. Google is maintaining the core Linux-based system and releasing it under an open license. Phone vendors are using Android, but often not as it comes straight from Google. They try to differentiate and modifies Android to their liking. Google reacted quickly and made a fix for the Stagefright bug. This fix will be distributed to their own Nexus-smartphones soon. But it may not be that simple for the other vendors. They need to verify that the patch is compatible with their customizations, and releasing it to their customers may be a lengthy process. If they even want to patch handsets. Some vendors seems to see products in the cheap smartphone segment as disposable goods. They are not supposed to be long-lived and post-sale maintenance is just a cost. Providing updates and patches would just postpone replacement of the phone, and that’s not in the vendor’s interest. This attitude explains why several Android vendors have very poor processes and systems for sending out updates. Many phones will never be patched. Let’s put this into perspective. Android is the most widespread operating system on this planet. 48 % of the devices shipped in 2014 were Androids (Gartner). And that includes both phones, tablets, laptops and desktop computers. There’s over 1 billion active Android devices (Google’s device activation data). Most of them are vulnerable to Stagefright and many of them will never receive a patch. This is big! Let’s however keep in mind that there is no widespread malware utilizing this vulnerability at the time of writing. But all the ingredients needed to make a massive and harmful worm outbreak are there. Also remember that the bug has existed in Android for over five years, but not been publically known until now. It is perfectly possible that intelligence agencies are utilizing it silently for their own purposes. But can we do anything to protect us? That’s the hard question. This is not intended to be a comprehensive guide, but it is however possible to give some simple advice. You can stop worrying if you have a really old device with an Android version lower than 2.2. It’s not vulnerable. Google Nexus devices will be patched soon. A patch has also been released for devices with the CyanogenMod system. The privacy-optimized BlackPhone is naturally a fast-mover in cases like this. Other devices? It’s probably best to just google for “Stagefright” and the model or vendor name of your device. Look for two things. Information about if and when your device will receive an update and for instructions about how to tweak settings to mitigate the threat. Here’s an example.   Safe surfing, Micke Image by Rob Bulmahn under CC BY 2.0

July 30, 2015
BY 
travel, amalfi coast, digital safety, security

6 digital ways to save your summer vacation

My wife had to remind me to look up from my smartphone. We were traveling on the one-lane coastal road that connects Sorrento with Italy's Amalfi coast. I looked down and saw the Li Galli islands, which according to local legend are where the sirens beckoned the hero of Homer's Odyssey into the rocks. In Naples, my iPhone had been my tour guide, allowing me to get pizza recommendations from my friend and then scout out when was the best time to eat, according to the reviews. It had brought us to the Museo Cappella Sansevero to see Veiled Christ and helped us chose a gelateria from the hundreds of options. And now I was plotting our visit to the beachfront town of Positano. If you're addicted to your mobile device or checking in online, you know it can improve or ruin your vacation. And missing a great view could be the least of your worries. You should look up from your phone occasionally, but you can stay connected and safe with a few precautions. 1. Lock your devices. You wouldn't leave post-it note with your PIN on your ATM card. So don't invite strangers into your phone to turn off your anti-theft app and start digging through your digital life. Use an unguessable passcode on all your devices and set your devices to lock. 2. Don't bank or shop on a public computer. Strange computers can have strange keyloggers or some other malware that could slurp up your information. (If you have to use a public computer to get on Facebook, for instance, use a one-time password.) 3. Clean up your phone. You hear lots of news reports about how gross and covered with bacteria our phones are. But the inside suffers from the same buildup of crap. "Phones and computers always store information about what you do. Internet browsers store a history," Security Advisor Sean Sullivan told us. "Apps create temporary files where they store stuff to help them run faster. A lot of apps and websites have passwords and contact information about you stored." Our free Booster app makes cleaning your device easy. 4. Assume you're being watched. What do using a ATM and logging into your MacBook Pro both say to crooks? I have money that you could take. While you're sightseeing, you become the sight criminals are seeing. You use a money belt to hold your passports, cash and credit cards -- or you should. So use the same caution whenever looking at a screen. 5. Practice safe Wi-Fi and use a VPN. If you're using someone else's Wi-Fi -- whether you're at a motel, coffee shop or a rental you booked through AirBnB -- it's someone else's Wi-Fi. Even five-star hotel network isn't 100 percent safe. So don't expect others to watch out for you. "You often have to choose between using free Wi-Fi hotspots or paying roaming charges to use your mobile connection," Sullivan said. "Using a VPN like Freedome gives you a secure funnel that lets you use public Wi-Fi connections without assuming the risks." 6. Before you go, store your important passwords and PIN codes in a safe location. Have you ever struggled with forgotten passwords or PIN codes after a relaxing summer break? Why not being a bit smarter this year, so store your passwords in a password manager, and they are there waiting for you when you come back. You can download F-Secure KEY for free for your iPhone, iPad or Android phone here. Cheers, Jason [Photo by Giuseppe Milo | Flickr]

June 10, 2015
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