_MG_4957

How we go deeper to protect you from new threats

Read our whitepaper about F-Secure DeepGuard, our proactive protection against new and emerging threats. Read it here.

You may know that F-Secure won the Best Protection Award – twice in a row. But if you’ve ever wondered about how we actually go about protecting our customers from malware, this post is for you. We do it by going deeper. Let me explain.

Traditional antivirus software looks at the outward characteristics of files to see if the characteristics match those of previously seen malware files. If they match, the antivirus program knows to block the file.

For this system to work, antivirus labs need to have a sample of the malware file in order to analyze its characteristics so they know exactly what they need to block.

This is a very effective method for blocking most malware seen to date, and this is how F-Secure protects you from existing malware we already know about.

Of course, it takes time for antivirus labs to receive a malware sample and analyze it so we can effectively block it. That means brand new malware created just in the past few days or weeks that we haven’t yet had a chance to analyze, can get past traditional scanning systems.

Complicating the issue, cybercriminals who create malware nowadays are very clever at avoiding detection by antivirus programs. One way they do this is by creating new, different variants of their malware. These variants are still the same malware at the core, but they appear new and different on the outside. Like a criminal who dresses in disguise to avoid being recognized, the malware file is disguised to avoid detection by antivirus software. There are automated malware creation kits that do this for the cybercriminals, making it easy to spit out thousands of new variants.

To be able to protect from brand new malware, then, and to protect from all the new variants of existing malware, it is crucial for F-Secure’s software to be able to detect a malware file even before our Labs have ever received a sample of it.

So how do we block malware strains we’ve never seen? We examine not just a file’s outward characteristics, but we also monitor its behavior for suspicious activity. Like I said, malware can change in appearance and characteristics. But one thing never changes: Malware always does malicious things. So if we’re not sure if a file is malicious or not, we watch to see how the program behaves.

We call our behavioral analysis technology DeepGuard. DeepGuard observes a program’s behavior and prevents potentially harmful actions from successfully completing. This way, we can block even brand new malware files that haven’t yet been analyzed. And we can stop malicious files that are disguised as something else.

When the user opens a file, any file, DeepGuard instantaneously checks for suspicious behavior, and if it finds something, it will block the program from launching. Since some malware hide their malicious behavior until after the program launches, DeepGuard still continues monitoring programs while they are running, watching for and blocking suspicious actions.

DeepGuard is a feature of F-Secure’s products, working in tandem with our other protection layers (browsing protection, traditional signature scanning, file reputation analysis, and prevalence rate checking) to provide the very best protection. Our newest version, DeepGuard 5 with exploit protection, has already been rolled out, so customers with the latest versions of F-Secure products are already benefiting from the latest technology.

And that’s how we protect you.

More posts from this topic

Juhannus

How To Prepare Yourself and Your Phone For Juhannus

In Finland, there is this thing called juhannus. A few years ago, our former colleague Hetta described it like this: Well, Midsummer – or juhannus – as it is called in Finnish, is one of the most important public holidays in our calendar. It is celebrated, as you probably guessed, close to the dates of the Summer Solstice, when day is at its longest in the northern hemisphere. Finland being so far up north, the sun doesn’t set on juhannus at all. Considering that in the winter we get the never ending night, it’s no surprise we celebrate the sun not setting. So what do Finns do to celebrate juhannus? I already told you we flock to our summer cottages, but what then? We decorate the cottage with birch branches to celebrate the summer, we stock up on new potatoes which are just now in season and strawberries as well. We fire up the barbecue and eat grilled sausages to our hearts content. We burn bonfires that rival with the unsetting sun. And we get drunk. If that isn't vivid enough, this video may help: [protected-iframe id="f18649f0b62adf8eb1ec638fa5066050-10874323-9129869" info="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fsuomifinland100%2Fvideos%2F1278272918868972%2F&show_text=0&width=560" width="560" height="315" frameborder="0" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no"] And because the celebration is just so... celebratory, it's easy to lose your phone. So here are a few ways to prepare yourself for a party that lasts all night. 1. Don't use 5683 as your passcode. That spells love and it's also one of the first passcodes anyone trying to crack into your phone will try. So use something much more creative -- and use a 6-digit code if you can on your iPhone. You can also encrypt your Android. 2. Write down your IMEI number. If you lose your phone, you're going to need this so make sure you have it written down somewhere safe. 3. Back your content up. This makes your life a lot easier if your party goes too well and it's pretty simple on any iOS device. Just make sure you're using a strong, unique password for your iCloud account. Unfortunately on an Android phone, you'll have to use a third-party app. 4. Maybe just leave it home. Enjoy being with your friends and assume that they'll get the pictures you need to refresh your memory. And while you're out you can give your phone a quick internal "clean" with our free Boost app. [Image by Janne Hellsten | Flickr]

June 22, 2016
instagram bug hunter, mikko and jani, young hacker

10-Year-Old Who Took Home $10,000 Instagram Bug Bounty Visits F-Secure Labs

Mikko Hyppönen -- our Chief Research Officer and probably the most famous code warrior ever to come out of Finland -- likes to point out that he was born the same year as the internet. Jani -- the ten-year-old from Helsinki who made international news by earning Instagram's top bug bounty prize for uncovering a security flaw in the photo-sharing site -- was born a couple a years after Facebook was invented in 2004 and just four years before Instagram went online in 2010. And he's already made some history. Jani discovered a flaw in the site that would have allowed him -- or anyone -- to delete content from any user from the site, even stars with tens of millions of followers including Taylor Swift, Selena Gomez and Beyonce. Like any good white-hat hacker he didn't take advantage of the vulnerability. Instead, he reported the bug to Facebook, which now owns the app, directly. His maturity paid off. Even though he is not technically old enough to use the site according Instagram's terms and conditions, he's become the youngest person ever to win a $10,000 bug bounty, which he's used to purchase a soccer ball, a bike and other essential gear for being ten. To celebrate his feat, F-Secure Labs invited Jani to visit our headquarters for a hamburger and a tour. The visit gave our experts a chance to share their stories about how they were drawn to cybersecurity. Mikko learned to love computers from his mother who was in the industry. Päivi was guided into the field by her father and discovered that she has a passion for rooting out spam.  When Tomi was a kid striving to learn the rules of the coin games his friends played so he could hack them and win, he recognized that he didn't see the world like everyone else. Jani has already discovered the same thing. Though he finds plenty of time for school and playing with his friends, he spends 2-3 hours during his off days hunting for vulnerabilities and looking out for new bug bounty programs -- like our own -- that allow him to test his skills. How did he find the vulnerability in Instagram? First he created two accounts. He posted a comment using one account and then just using the publicly available content id number he was able to delete the comment using the other. Immediately he recognized the potential for such a flaw to be exploited. Mikko and Tomi were impressed by how Jani used Linux and Burp Suite --  a tool that pros like the analysts in our Labs use to analyze network traffic -- to help identify the bug. While he used to be interested in a career in video games, Jani says he's now thinking about becoming a cybersecurity specialist. Mikko and Tomi advised him to finish school and stay on the right side of the law. They also invited him to spend a week or two working at the Labs to see how he likes the job, when he's old enough. He's planning on taking them up on the offer, saying that F-Secure looks like a "fun and cool" place to work. Nice. We're always looking for new talent and even Mikko may retire one day.  

June 22, 2016
BY