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25 Fellows for 25 Years: Morgan MacDonald

As we celebrate our 25th anniversary over the next month, we’re paying tribute to the women and men who helped build the success story that is F-Secure. You can experience that story here and help us fight malware in our anniversary arcade game.

Today we speak to Account Manager Morgan MacDonald who joined F-Secure in 2006.

Where were you 25 years ago?

July of 1988 I had just finished my 2nd year at UCLA and was visiting Chicago, IL where I saw a little known band, Guns N’ Roses open for Aerosmith.

What’s surprised you most since you’ve joined F-Secure?

The most surprising thing since joining F-Secure is what a significant and major impact our small sized company has on the security industry.

What’s your favorite piece of technology?

One of the more interesting pieces of technology today is seen in the automotive industry. It is the concept of self-driving/parking vehicles. The next evolution of this technology will be incredibly impactful on society.

What F-Secure memory is most irreplaceable to you?

In 2007/08, the excellent response we had to two of the last major outbreaks, Storm Worm and Conficker. Let’s hope the security industry never sees these types of events again.

How will the world be different in 25 years?

A major difference will be the user interface used to interact with technology. For the most part gesture based, either big movements or smaller finger based, will replace touchpad, stick, trackball and mouse as a way of interacting with technology. (great news for those who don’t like germs) Keypads/keyboards will remain and the QWERTY concept at least for some regions will remain unchanged with the exception of additional short-cut keys with more commonly

25 Fellows for 25 Years

Mikko Hypponen – 1991
Jyrki Airola — 1994
Pekka Usva — 1995
Kim Englund — 1996
Pirkka Palomäki — 1997
Ilkka Ranta — 1997
Veli-Jussi Kesti — 1998
Taneli Virtanen — 1999
Kalle Korpi — 2001
Mike Graham — 2001

Miska Repo– 2004

Suh Gim Goh –2010
Orestis Kostakis — 2010
Harri Kiljander — 2010
Pratima Potturu — 2010

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The one question that could change the privacy debate

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May 1, 2015
BY 
kids laptop remote working take your kids to work

How about ‘Take Your Work to Kid’ Day?

In the United States, Australia and Canada, April 23 will be Take Our Sons and Daughters to Work Day. But given our changing economy and workplace, is one day enough to improve the bonds between parent and child? Originally created to give girls a chance to "shadow" their parents in the workplaces women have so often been excluded from, Take Your Kid to Work Day, as it's often called, was expanded in 2003 to include boys as a way to help all kids see "the power and possibilities associated with a balanced work and family life." It's a nice ideal, but it isn't much of a reality, at least in many industrial countries. Americans spend an average of 1,788 hours a year at work. Most parents with full-time jobs will spend almost two-thirds of their day working and sleeping, leaving little time for anything else. Hopefully your country is a little better at balancing work/home. Finnish workers, for instance, spent 1,666 hours on average at work in 2013 that's 122 hours or 3 full weeks less than their American counterparts. Don't be jealous: German workers only averaged 1,388 hours at work in 2013. Chances are wherever you live your kids already see you at work. A 2012 survey found that 60 percent of Americans are email accessible for 13.5 hours a weekday with an extra 5 hours on the weekend. Given the extraordinary demands work makes on us, perhaps you can make a demand on your work to be a bit more flexible. Given that we're nearly always accessible, why can't parents plan around their kids' schedules and get some work done? Activities like sports, dance, karate and other arts offer parents a chance to be an active observer of their kids while getting some work done on a mobile PC or device while their children are being supervised by another adult. Given that 70 percent of millennial use their own devices for work, it's likely that younger parents already do this to some degree on their phones and tablets. But they're likely not thinking about potential data leakage that can occur, especially when using public Wi-Fi built on old technology that could expose your identity and possibly even your email. But with security and a virtual personal network -- like our Freedome VPN -- you can be about as secure in the office as you're out in the world seeing how your kids work, as they get another chance to see you. Cheers, Sandra [Image by Wesley Fryer | Flickr]        

April 21, 2015