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25 Fellows for 25 Years: Timo Laaksonen

infogAs we celebrate our 25th anniversary over the next month, we’re paying tribute to the women and men who helped build the success story that is F-Secure. You can experience that story here and help us fight malware in our anniversary arcade game.

Today we speak to the Vice President of our Content Cloud initiative Timo Laaksonen who joined F-Secure in 2012.

Where were you 25 years ago?

Relatively fresh off Business School, a few years in work life. Exactly 25 years ago I was a sales manager at Nokia Data in Turku, Finland, responsible for the travel business segment, i.e. hotels, cruising lines, travel agencies, airlines, etc. A bachelor still, no kids. Actively playing volleyball at the time.

What’s surprised you most since you’ve joined F-Secure?

The fantastic energy, excitement and innovation that my fellows have shown in building content cloud business.

What’s your favorite piece of technology? 

My mobile phone. Can’t live without it!

What F-Secure memory is most irreplaceable to you?

Those moments with our operator partners where we have shared the excitement of entering the personal cloud business, together.

How will the world be different in 25 years?

Smaller, still. Travel, communication, interaction will be many times easier than it is today breaking down artificial barriers between people, businesses and nations as we get closer to each other. The world will be one of interwoven interests, networks and opportunities. As long as we respect the nature in all our decisions the world will be a very good place in 25 years from now.    

What”s your 25th birthday wish for F-Secure?

My wish for all the people in F-Secure: Live, love and learn – to your full potential.

25 Fellows for 25 Years

Mikko Hypponen – 1991
Jyrki Airola — 1994
Pekka Usva — 1995
Kim Englund — 1996
Pirkka Palomäki — 1997
Ilkka Ranta — 1997
Veli-Jussi Kesti — 1998
Taneli Virtanen — 1999
Kalle Korpi — 2001
Mike Graham — 2001
Johan Jarl — 2002
Miska Repo– 2004
Morgan MacDonald — 2006
Suh Gim Goh –2010
Orestis Kostakis — 2010
Harri Kiljander — 2010
Pratima Potturu — 2010

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Step back in time to when hackers were just having fun

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