330x330_futis-maalivahti

Why your PC needs a great goal keeper

What is the value of superior detection rate? Does it really matter if your security software, your goal keeper, blocks close to 100% or close to 90% of malware attacks?

A simple answer – yes!

On average, one out of ten new zero-day malware attacks succeed as the detection software cannot anticipate the upcoming hits to the goal. The accrued costs to the company of all the related work and possible data loss are huge.

Let’s play with the numbers a bit:

  • With 500 employees, assuming they each face two malware per year, the company would face up to 1000 malware per year. If you have an industry average goal keeper who only blocks 92% of the attacks, this means about 80 successful hits into the goal.

80 malware that hit the goal will mean a lot of money. Both the external and internal costs can be significant. Internally, the detection, recovery, investigation etc will take a lot of time from your security officers and affected employees. However, the external repercussions can be even more staggering. Or how would you value information loss, business disruption, or revenue loss?

Neither can you sit back and relax thinking that you or your company are too small and insignificant for the attackers to target you. The game is on every day and regardless of the opponent. 79% of malware attacks are opportunity based. This means that anyone can be a target, it is just a question of who is the easiest one. The team with a weak or average goal keeper is a much easier to win over than the one with a superior goal keeper.

Malware is constantly evolving, with new tricks and features, just like the players on the field come up with new tactics to win the game. It is the popular software that is most often targeted, both based on known vulnerabilities and with new threats. So today, it is just as critical to be able to identify the clean, non-malicious software to be able to focus attention on the harmful attacks as it is for the goal keeper in the game to see the whole field to anticipate the next attack.

Think then: what if you had a super goal keeper that blocks even new or emerging malware attacks by anticipating the moves of the opponent and by having eyes even in the back?

DeepGuard detection technology is just like such a goal keeper. Continuously, DeepGuard technology is at the top of detection rate studies. The multi-layered protection is your winning team with a super goalie and the best defense team. This means that you and your business can be safe and secure in the knowledge that your goalie foresees and prevents the attacks, keeping your goal clean.

F-Secure Client Security uses DeepGuard, and can also be enhanced with Software Updater. It offers uncompromised security with minimal impact on performance.

Cheers, Eija

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Only 10% protected – Interesting study on travelers’ security habits

Kaisu who is working for us is also studying tourism. Her paper on knowledge of and behavior related to information security amongst young travelers was released in May, and is very interesting reading. The world is getting smaller. We travel more and more, and now we can stay online even when travelling. Using IT-services in unknown environments does however introduce new security risks. Kaisu wanted to find out how aware young travelers are of those risks, and what they do to mitigate them. The study contains many interesting facts. Practically all, 95,7%, are carrying a smartphone when travelling. One third is carrying a laptop and one in four a tablet. The most commonly used apps and services are taking pictures, using social networks, communication apps and e-mail, which all are used by about 90% of the travelers. Surfing the web follows close behind at 72%. But I’m not going to repeat it all here. The full story is in the paper. What I find most interesting is however what the report doesn’t state. Everybody is carrying a smartphone and snapping pictures, using social media, surfing the web and communicating. Doesn’t sound too exotic, right? That’s what we do in our everyday life too, not just when travelling. The study does unfortunately not examine the participants’ behavior at home. But I dare to assume that it is quite similar. And I find that to be one of the most valuable findings. Traveling is no longer preventing us from using IT pretty much as we do in our everyday life. I remember when I was a kid long, long ago. This was even before invention of the cellphone. There used to be announcements on the radio in the summer: “Mr. and Mrs. Müller from Germany traveling by car in Lapland. Please contact your son Hans urgently.” Sounds really weird for us who have Messenger, WhatsApp, Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat and Skype installed on our smartphones. There was a time when travelling meant taking a break in your social life. Not anymore. Our social life is today to an increasing extent handled through electronic services. And those services goes with us when travelling, as Kaisu’s study shows. So you have access to the same messaging channels no matter where you are on this small planet. But they all require a data connection, and this is often the main challenge. There are basically two ways to get the data flowing when abroad. You can use data roaming through the cellphone’s ordinary data connection. But that is often too expensive to be feasible, so WiFi offers a good and cheap alternative. Hunting for free WiFi has probably taken the top place on the list of travelers’ concerns, leaving pickpockets and getting burnt in the sun behind. Another conclusion from Kaisu’s study is that travelers have overcome this obstacle, either with data roaming or WiFi. The high usage rates for common services is a clear indication of that. But how do they protect themselves when connecting to exotic networks? About 10% are using a VPN and about 20% say they avoid public WiFi. That leaves us with over 70% who are doing something else, or doing nothing. Some of them are using data roaming, but I’m afraid most of them just use whatever WiFi is available, either ignoring the risks or being totally unaware. That’s not too smart. Connecting to a malicious WiFi network can expose you to eavesdropping, malware attacks, phishing and a handful other nasty tricks. It’s amazing that only 10% of the respondents have found the simple and obvious solution, a VPN. It stands for Virtual Private Network and creates a protected “tunnel” for your data through the potentially harmful free networks. Sounds too nerdy? No, it’s really easy. Just check out Freedome. It’s the super-simple way to be among the smart 10%.   Safe surfing, Micke   PS. I recently let go of my old beloved Nokia Lumia. Why? Mainly because I couldn’t use Freedome on it, and I really want the freedom it gives me while abroad.   Image by Moyan Brenn  

August 24, 2015
BY 
Hackers Love Multitaskers

Why Hackers and Viruses Love Multitaskers

This is the sixth in a series of posts about Cyber Defense that happened to real people in real life, costing very real money. Chris, a very ordinary businessman, was on a very ordinary business trip when he received an urgent call from one of his business partners asking him to make a money transfer. Chris was waiting for a train at a station, but he was happy to have the opportunity to help out his colleague, so he quickly pulled his laptop out of his bag to make the transfer. The account for his company-owned mobile phone was maxed out, so he wanted to take advantage of the train station’s Wi-Fi while he had a chance. He booted up his laptop and started looking for a free connection. Fortunately, “Railway_Station_Name” was open to the public – no username, password, or registration required. “Phew! Caught a lucky break there,” thought Chris. Fueled by motivation to get the job done, Chris went ahead and connected to the seemingly trustworthy network. He noticed it was a little bit slow, and not wanting to risk missing his train, he closed all the background apps and processes, including his anti-virus software. He really wanted to use the opportunity to show his initiative to his team, and he didn’t want to risk missing his meeting or not finishing the transfer because his computer was slow. He figured that as long as he avoids opening emails or browsing the web, he wouldn’t have any problems. And just like he thought, it was all over in a couple of minutes. He completed the money transfer without any issues. He shut down his laptop and hurried off to catch his train, confident that he had done the right thing by taking a few minutes to help his business partner. “A job well done,” Chris thought to himself. Chris arrived back at his hotel later that evening and booted up his laptop again to send some emails and wrap up his day. But his computer wasn’t working properly. It was slow. Error messages were spreading over his desktop like flies on spoiled fruit. He tried running an anti-virus check, but even that wouldn’t work. He decided to take it into a computer store he had passed earlier to see if they could take a look at it for him. He only had to wait at the shop for a few minutes while the store’s staff checked his laptop. “The problem is your computer’s infected by a virus – several in fact,” said the clerk. “One of the viruses disabled your AV software, and you’ve also got a ton of spyware. We’ve cleaned it up for you so you should be good to go now, but try to be more careful in the future.” The satisfaction Chris had felt earlier was suddenly gone. Now he was plagued with doubt about whether or not his information was secure, and even worse, he was concerned that perhaps the bank account he had used earlier had been compromised. He’d heard of such things happening to other people working for other companies. He thought that maybe these other people had just been suckers, scammed by some spam emails or clicking random links they found online. But now he wasn’t so sure, so he decided to change all of the passwords for his online accounts. Chris retired to his hotel, feeling stressed, and with a lighter wallet from paying the guys at the computer shop for helping him out. He told himself that he would think twice before disabling his AV software in the future. But Chris’ doubts about what he’d done, and what kind of threats he had been exposed to, continued to linger. Chris didn’t realize that he’d fallen into a trap, and connected to a rogue Wi-Fi hotspot that a hacker had prepared at the train station. These kinds of opportunistic attacks are quite common because they capitalize on people taking Wi-Fi security for granted, and are quite easy and cheap for hackers to put together. As this video shows, it’s a small feat to trick people into connecting to public Wi-Fi hotspots that hackers can use to steal account credentials and intercept communications. [youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qk2RPOBpZvc&w=560&h=315] F-Secure Security Advisor Su Gim Goh recently conducted an experiment in Hong Kong to see how many people connect to Wi-Fi hotspots without verifying that the connections are safe. He put together a Wi-Fi hotspot for less than 200 U.S. dollars, and took it to different cafes and restaurants in Hong Kong. Goh was able to determine that 55% of people automatically connected to his hotspot, which was set up to spoof legitimate connections that people want to use. “Spoofing” legitimate Wi-Fi hotspots means that the bad Wi-Fi hotspots are able to trick devices into thinking they’re legitimate hotspots that have been used before, so anyone that’s used the legitimate (“spoofed”) Wi-Fi hotspot in the past, and has their device recognize it as a preferred or safe network, will be automatically connected to the “spoofing” hotspot. Goh and many other security researchers warn people against taking Wi-Fi security for granted. “Auto-connecting is typically bad for security, so you should disable that option on your phone, or even just keep your Wi-Fi off when you’re not using it. It’s really not that hard to toggle it on/off, and it’s better than learning the hard way.”

August 20, 2015
BY 
SMS premium text message, comic, angry boss

A text that makes a rich man poor

This is the fifth in a series of posts about Cyber Defense that happened to real people in real life, costing very real money. Kamil left a business meeting and immediately took out his phone to call a client. During the conversation the device buzzed with an incoming text message. After Kamil unlocked the screen, a text popped up: “Thank you for activating the WEATHER TODAY service. You will be receiving a text message with the forecast three times a day. The daily cost of the service is one Euro. If you want to cancel your subscription, please text us ‘STOP.A133’ at 92590.” Nothing of this made any sense to Kamil. He had never activated any service on that phone. It was a company phone, he used only to contact clients. In any case, he didn’t need any weather forecasts. In order to save his company money, he quickly followed instructions from the text and cancelled the service. “Done!”, he thought and went back to his car to return to the head office of his firm, a consulting company. But this was only the beginning of his troubles... “Came to my office immediately”, read the email Kamil got from his boss Jacek two weeks later. “This must be about the contract with the bank that I finally closed,” thought Kamil and rushed upstairs to see his supervisor. “Are you out of your mind?! There an extra 500 Euro on top of your phone subscription fees because you’ve activated some extra services! You have everything you need to work, unlimited calls, online access. But I will not burn the firm’s money for some stupid extras!”, Jacek fumed. “Boss, I got a strange text about some weather forecast service, but I immediately blocked the subscription, I didn’t know there was any problem”, explained Kamil, surprised. He agreed to pay the fees out of his own pocket and immediately explain the whole situation. Jacek seemed to cool down a little, but promised that he would place a note on Kamil’s file if the issue wasn’t solved by the end of the month. “This time, I’m gonna keep it off-record, but I’m watching you”, the manager warned Kamil. Startled and confused, Kamil decided to do some online research about WEATHER TODAY. As he saw the first browser hits, he already knew he found what he was looking for. An article on a professional computer security portal reported that the activation message was a ruse used to wrangle money out of unaware recipients of the text message. It was precisely the STOP.A133 message that cost Kamil 500 Euro. He followed the article author’s advice and decided to install mobile security software that protects against spam. Having compared available options, he chose the best app from a reputable developer and never risked his job over an SMS message again. Is there anything you can do to protect yourself besides installing mobile security and not responding to unsolicited texts from unknown senders? "Some mobile operators will let you opt out of or disable billing through SMS messages," F-Secure Security Sean Sullivan explained. "It is very surprising to me that many businesses don’t demand bulk disabling by default for their employer provided plans." To get an inside look at business security, be sure to follow our Business Insider blog.

August 12, 2015