330x330_futis-maalivahti

Why your PC needs a great goal keeper

What is the value of superior detection rate? Does it really matter if your security software, your goal keeper, blocks close to 100% or close to 90% of malware attacks?

A simple answer – yes!

On average, one out of ten new zero-day malware attacks succeed as the detection software cannot anticipate the upcoming hits to the goal. The accrued costs to the company of all the related work and possible data loss are huge.

Let’s play with the numbers a bit:

  • With 500 employees, assuming they each face two malware per year, the company would face up to 1000 malware per year. If you have an industry average goal keeper who only blocks 92% of the attacks, this means about 80 successful hits into the goal.

80 malware that hit the goal will mean a lot of money. Both the external and internal costs can be significant. Internally, the detection, recovery, investigation etc will take a lot of time from your security officers and affected employees. However, the external repercussions can be even more staggering. Or how would you value information loss, business disruption, or revenue loss?

Neither can you sit back and relax thinking that you or your company are too small and insignificant for the attackers to target you. The game is on every day and regardless of the opponent. 79% of malware attacks are opportunity based. This means that anyone can be a target, it is just a question of who is the easiest one. The team with a weak or average goal keeper is a much easier to win over than the one with a superior goal keeper.

Malware is constantly evolving, with new tricks and features, just like the players on the field come up with new tactics to win the game. It is the popular software that is most often targeted, both based on known vulnerabilities and with new threats. So today, it is just as critical to be able to identify the clean, non-malicious software to be able to focus attention on the harmful attacks as it is for the goal keeper in the game to see the whole field to anticipate the next attack.

Think then: what if you had a super goal keeper that blocks even new or emerging malware attacks by anticipating the moves of the opponent and by having eyes even in the back?

DeepGuard detection technology is just like such a goal keeper. Continuously, DeepGuard technology is at the top of detection rate studies. The multi-layered protection is your winning team with a super goalie and the best defense team. This means that you and your business can be safe and secure in the knowledge that your goalie foresees and prevents the attacks, keeping your goal clean.

F-Secure Client Security uses DeepGuard, and can also be enhanced with Software Updater. It offers uncompromised security with minimal impact on performance.

Cheers, Eija

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vulnerabilities holes software unpatched

The biggest security mistakes small businesses make

Online criminals are in the business of finding holes -- holes in your software. "Pieces of software will always have vulnerabilities, and there will always be criminals creating exploits for those vulnerabilities," says F-Secure Senior Researcher Timo Hirvonen. "It's become a whole business model for these criminals, because the security patches that companies release basically expose the vulnerabilities in software. The criminals reverse engineer the patches to find vulnerabilities, and then they target those vulnerabilities with exploits they develop." Given that they spend all day thinking about how to get into your network and you spend all all day trying to run your business, they may have the advantage. But there is a lot you can do to make your data and customers safer. Our Security Advisor Sean Sullivan recently responded to questions we frequently hear from businesses trying to secure their IT infrastructure. He explained with what the most common vulnerabilities tend to be, the steps you can take to patch them and the biggest mistakes businesses make. Mobile apps and cloud systems allow employees to access documents, systems, data and other work product from anywhere, but always-on access comes with always-threatening security risks. What are the most significant of those risks? Always on and working from anywhere means more devices and a larger attack surface area. Even a diligent and tech-savvy person who is cautious about not opening a suspicious file can still be a victim of exploits, as these kits automatically take advantage of vulnerabilities in software that are commonly used by browsers and programs, such as Adobe Reader, Flash players, etc. More than half of what F-Secure is blocking these days are exploits, and they’re among the biggest threats to SMBs because people frequently don't update their software and this puts the business at greater risk. A Java plug-in update, for example, that people often ignore thinking it’s not a mission-critical application for their day-to-day activities can be the chink in the armor that lets in a malicious attack. Some of the exploit kits we're detecting are using exploits that have been detected and patched MONTHS ago, but the attackers are betting that many businesses haven’t updated their software, and their bets are paying off. What are the most important steps small and medium-sized businesses should take to protect themselves against those risks? The cybersecurity landscape is fluid so invest in sending your IT person to training seminars so he or she can learn more about protecting your users and network. Additionally, selecting a cloud-based security solution helps you and your employees not have to worry about updating plugins and applications. What are some of the biggest mistakes SMBs make in this area? They undervalue their data and content. Training documents for new hires, for example, aren’t mission critical to the business functioning, so it’s likely the business wouldn’t see it as valuable, but if they had to recreate all of those files from scratch, it would likely take a lot of time and resources, right? Thinking an attacker won’t go after certain items because it’s not important to them is the wrong mindset — they care about what’s important to you. Backup files in multiple locations — online and physical hard drives. Use a VPN to encrypt your communication and encourage or provide VPN applications for your employees to use on their work and personal devices. Lastly, keep your systems updated. Using a cloud-based security software that takes care of all that helps saves you time and money and lets you focus on your business and the professionals handle security. Our F-Secure Booster's premium version contains a software update feature that can you monitor their drivers and applications to keep them patched in protected. Our business products also feature Software Updater to keep software updated and safe from exploits. [Image by elineart | Flickr]

May 28, 2015
Welcome Mat Key Security

6 ways to let criminals into your business

If you're in business, you have enemies -- and they're trying to get into your network. For-profit malware authors after baking information or files for extortion want in. Script-kiddies want in because mayhem is their game. And if you're large enough, criminals seeking data about your customers  for espionage want in too. "For instance, if you're a law firm," F-Secure Labs Senior Researcher Jarno Niemelä said in a recent webinar, "your clients might be interesting." And it's not just the clients of lawyers, who may be "interesting". He noted companies that specialize in car rental, car leasing, cleaning and catering all have customers that are attractive targets for your enemies. In order for an attack to be successful, the attacker must first get information about his or her targets. And the worst part is we may be letting our enemies in. Here are the 5 most common methods that is done: 1. Email. Spam is designed to hit anyone and only needs to work a tiny fraction of the time. A spear phishing attack was designed to get you. 2. Hacked websites. Like a lion hiding in a savannah, the best attackers infect a website you're likely to visit -- naughty and not naughty -- and wait for you to become their prey. 3. Search Engine Poisoning. Criminals target a specific search term and tries to drive an infected site up the Google rankings. 4. Traffic Injection. These more advanced attacks hijack your traffic and send it to a router controlled by the enemy. Once you've become the victim of a man-in-the-middle attack any web site you visit could be infected just for you. 5. Social engineering. What your enemy lacks in technical savvy, s/he could make up with the ability to fool you. 6. Affiliate marketing. Some criminals -- and intelligence agencies -- simply buy their victims in bulk. Jarno calls it "the digital slave trade". Of course, these aren't the only ways into your network. Jarno also explained how offline attacks through external drives, for instance, can provide access. But these are the six most likely ways your enemies will find their way in your network. And you should have some idea what they're up to, since their success depends on your mistakes. Cheers, Sandra    

May 19, 2015
Mikko Hypponen What Twitter knows

Your favorite breakfast cereal and other things Twitter knows about you

At Re:publica 2015, our Chief Research Officer Mikko Hypponen told the main stage crowd that the world's top scientists are now focused on the delivery of ads. "I think this is sad," he said. [youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pbF0sVdOjRw?rel=0&start=762&end=&autoplay=0] To give the audience a sense of how much Twitter knows about its users, he showed them the remarkable targeting the microblogging service offers its advertisers. If you use the site, you may be served promoted tweets based on the following: 1. What breakfast cereal you eat. 2. The alcohol you drink. 3. Your income. 4. If you suffer from allergies. 5. If you're expecting a child. And that's just the beginning. You can be targeted based not only on your recent device purchases but things you may be in the market for like, say, a new house or a new car. You can see all the targeting offered by logging into your Twitter, going to the top right corner of the interface, clicking on your icon and selecting "Twitter Ads". Can Twitter learn all this just based on your tweets and which accounts follow? No, Mikko said. "They buy this information from real world shops, from credit card companies, and from frequent buyer clubs." Twitter then connects this information to you based on... your phone number. And you've agreed to have this happen to you because you read and memorized the nearly 7,000 words in its Terms and Conditions. Because everyone reads the terms and conditions. Full disclosure: We do occasionally promote tweets on Twitter to promote or digital freedom message and tools like Freedome that block ad trackers. It's an effective tool and we find the irony rich. Part of our mission is to make it clear that there's no such thing as "free" on the internet. If you aren't paying a price, you are the product. Aral Balkan compares social networks to a creepy uncle" that pays the bills by listening to as many of your conversations as they can then selling what they've heard to its actual customers. And with the world's top minds dedicated to monetizing your attention, we just think you should be as aware of advertisers as they are as of you. Most of the top URLs in the world are actually trackers that you never access directly. To get a sense of what advertisers learn every time you click check out our new Privacy Checker. Cheers, Jason

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BY