Facebook-Open-Graph

Here’s how Facebook’s Open Graph search could get you in trouble

cautionHave you played with Facebook’s Open Graph search yet?

Facebook’s new search tool is now available to all American users. The rest of the world still has to request its preview here.

Your search bar is now much more prominent in the interface and you should expect it to start playing a much bigger role in how people use the site. The tool mixes a little bit of fun with a little bit of creepiness. And while it’s definitely more useful that Facebook’s old search, it could get you in some trouble.

The good news is that the search respects your privacy settings. The bad news is a lot of people don’t seem to be that careful with their privacy settings.

We tested out these searches and were shocked by how many many profiles actually came up:

Screen Shot 2013-07-09 at 5.51.30 PM

Screen Shot 2013-07-09 at 5.53.44 PM

Screen Shot 2013-07-09 at 5.55.00 PM

How do you know if you’re protected from embarrassing searches?

We’ve made it easy to check. You can use our Safe Profile Beta app and get your privacy score and recommendations now.

Or you can check manually by clicking on the lock on the upper right corner of any Facebook page for “Privacy shortcuts”.

Screen Shot 2013-07-10 at 4.41.22 PM
Click on “Who can see my stuff?” then “What do other people see on my timeline?”

You’ll see what’s available to the “Public” your “Friends” or a specific person could find as they search for you.

If you’re not happy with anything that may come up, here’s an excellent guide for locking your profile down.

Open Graph search makes the information on your “About” page as well as the privacy settings of your “Friends”, “Photos” and “Likes” more important than ever. So be sure to check out the first four sections of this guide.

And — to be extra safe — I’m going to remind you to run Safe Profile beta, again. And if you do, let us know what score you got in the comments.

Cheers,

Jason

[Image by Eugene Zemlyanskiy via Flickr.com]

 

More posts from this topic

online_anonymity

Anonymity is not Just for Criminals – 3 legit Reasons to Hide your Tracks Online

  In 1853 a strange new invention appeared in the English cityscape, and caused a small wave of moral outrage among Victorians. This perceived threat to social order was not a new drug, political movement or saucy romance novel, but the seemingly harmless letter box. One reason was the shocking development of women now being able to post letters without consent from their husbands or fathers, and the other one was that sending anonymous letters would now be even easier. Maybe Victorians weren’t very thick-skinned, and were worried about unsigned letters calling people zounderkites and rantallions would skyrocket. Who knows?   History now tells us that these attempts to control this early form of long-distance communication were ridiculous. And yet, a modern version of this debate is happening even today: there are those who want to make encrypted, anonymous communication available for everyone, and those who wish to restrict it. No new technology comes without drawbacks, and encryption is no exception. However, just as with the Victorian letter box, the pros greatly outweigh the cons.   But why do people want to be anonymous online? Those who oppose encryption and other methods which advance online anonymity often throw around the tired argument “If you don’t have anything to hide, you have no need to be anonymous”. Not only does this statement show an astounding lack of perspective, it is also blatantly false. According to CBS there is a rising increase in desire for online anonymity, and there are many perfectly valid and legitimate reason to cover your tracks online. A lot of us just don’t feel comfortable with their Internet Service Provider, employer or even government having access to their surfing information. We all have a right to privacy, but technology is increasing the size of our digital footprint to the point when we can never know who is monitoring what we do online. Legislation, like the aptly nicknamed Snoopers Charter have the potential to give governments and ISP’s blanket rights to monitor web traffic of normal users in the name of security. This means the responsibility to protect our individual privacy rests increasingly in our own hands, and VPN services like our own Freedome go a long way in making that happen.   For many people, it’s about control. We share aspects of our lives and personality on social media and other websites, but the choice of what we share should be ours to make. This control is taken away by advertisers and tracking companies, who collect information about us from different websites and piece them together to form elaborate dossiers which contain way more information about us than most would be comfortable sharing, like your medical information or what kind of porn you watch. For many, part of being anonymous online is blocking this kind of intrusive tracking, and it’s hard to find fault in that.   The most serious group of people wanting anonymity are those for whom it is not so much a matter of principle but a matter of life and death. We are talking about activists, journalists and opposition supporters who operate under oppressive regimes or in places where criminals seek out and silence those who speak against them. It’s easy for those who support intrusive privacy legislation to forget that the governments who enact them will invariably have ulterior motives to “catching terrorists” or “protecting national security”: they give governments the power to control what we say.  Open and free communication is the greatest tool the masses have to keep those in power accountable for their actions, and there is nothing open or free about the kind of mass surveillance which is happening more and more, legally and otherwise.   What are your reasons to be anonymous online? This is not a black & white subject, and we’d be glad to hear your thoughts via the Freedome twitter channel @FreedomeVPN.

May 21, 2016
BY 
censored

5 Ways to ‘Uncensor’ Your Facebook Feed

Allegations that Facebook "suppressed" conservative news, first reported by Gizmodo, quickly snowballed into broader charges that Facebook "censors" viewpoints its employees doesn't like. Facebook is the first access point to the internet for hundreds of millions if not a billion people around the world. And for millennials in the U.S., it is their primary source for political news. Some have suggested that the site could actually tilt the 2016 U.S. presidential election. Hence Facebook takes these allegations and the damage they've done to Facebook's image among conservatives seriously. Users will never be able to control the "Trending" section of the site, which Facebook insists is handled objectively as possible through curators (and, apparently, a lot of help from Google). But you do have some control over your news feed, which is generated by Facebook's algorithm "Edgerank." There are things you can do to influence your feed in hopes of seeing a diverse flow of information that doesn't simply confirm your biases. Here are 5: Get rid of the noise. Go to https://www.facebook.com/friends/organize and add the people you want to get less news from to your "acquaintances" list. You'll see their posts a lot less often and -- best of all -- they'll have no idea you've demoted them. Let Facebook do less of the picking for you. On the left column of your home page, under Favorites, next to News Feed click the arrow and select "Most Recent". This won't turn off Facebook's algorithm completely, but it will make it more likely you'll see a diversity of sources in your feed. Trust someone. Find a few people you respect who have a different political leanings than you and ask them for one Facebook page to follow. Just one? That's enough. Once you like the page, Facebook will help from there by suggesting a few pages with similar leanings. Of course, you're relying on Facebook's recommendations. But if you don't trust Facebook at all, this would be a good time to delete your account. Prioritize the new blood. Click on the down arrow in the upper right corner of any Facebook page and select "News Feed Preferences" and then select "Prioritize who to see first" and then on the dropdown menu select "Pages only." Now click on those new pages you just added to your stream -- along with the other valuable news sources you think help keep you informed. 5. Teach Facebook what you like. When you see something you like, click on it, comment on it, interact with it. Facebook exists to keep you in Facebook and will reward your clicks with similar content. And if you get a post you don't like, you can tell Facebook by clicking on that subtle little down arrow, which will show you this: Yes, you're sort of "censoring" your feed. But at least it's you doing it. Cheers, Jason [Image by Turinboy | Flickr]

May 18, 2016
BY 
mikko hypponen WPFD

VIDEO: Mikko Hypponen at World Press Freedom Day

Today is World Press Freedom Day – a day created by UNESCO in recognition of the importance of free speech, as well as the important role journalists play in using this right to help inform citizens about what’s going on with the world around them. This year’s main event is being held in Helsinki, Finland, and co-hosted by the Finnish government. There was lots happening at Finlandia Hall – the event’s “ground zero”. And because Finland is home to F-Secure’s headquarters, we were there in full force to express our support for the journalists who, according to Reporters without Borders, put their privacy, freedom, and even their lives on the line to keep us all informed. Mikko Hypponen, F-Secure’s Chief Research Officer, delivered a keynote address ahead of a discussion called “Protecting your rights: Surveillance Overreach, Data Protection, and Online Censorship”. “But right now, over the last couple of years, the biggest changes in this field have not been with online crime. They’ve been with governments entering the online, cyber attack business,” Hypponen told the audience. [youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l4InPx7xraI?start=754] After his speech, Mikko shared some additional thoughts on Apple vs. the FBI, and World Press Freedom Day. [youtube=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BBINozrQGlc&w=420&h=315] Sean Sullivan was also there, along with one of F-Secure Labs’ forensic analysts to help journalists check their devices, and provide security tips on how they can protect their data. “Without privacy, we can’t have free press. And without a free press, we cannot have democracy. And without democracy, we cannot have freedom,” Mikko told the audience. And that’s not just rhetoric – it’s something we’re backing up. Any journalist interested in using encryption to protect themselves against unwanted surveillance can get in touch with us before May 15 to get a free, 3-device, 12-month subscription for F-Secure's Freedome VPN, which lets users encrypt their communications, block tracking attempts and malicious websites, and change their virtual location. All journalists need to do is send a confirmation of their valid press credentials (for example, an image) by direct message to our Twitter feed (@FSecure) before May 15. Edited to add: We also caught a panel discussion about digital threats to journalists with F-Secure Cyber Security Advisor Erka Koivunen, Tanzanian journalist and newspaper editor Dennis Msacky, and University professor, writer and journalist Hanna Nikkanen. [youtube=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WYifFDj2UaI&w=420&h=315]

May 3, 2016
BY