HitByMalware

If you were hit on the head by malware, would you even notice?

Did you know that in most cases, you do not realize when you have been hit by malware?

At least the site that has been said to be the source for a recent attack on Facebook, Apple and Twitter, claims to have known nothing of being compromised before reading about the security breaches on the news. Bloomberg.com tells the iPhone software development site was most likely used for a waterhole attack by East-European criminals.

Most malware programs use the vulnerabilities in popular software to get installed so that you do not even recognize the threat. New exploits are detected around the world all the time, and for example Java is usually at the top of the targeted software list. The amount of malware is alarmingly high, almost 60% of respondents of a Ponemon study confirmed over 25 malware incidents in their environments each month.

Sophisticated malware contaminates your pc or mobile just by a visit to an infected website, by opening an Office document, pdf or other document with an exploit. You will not notice anything peculiar. The days of the very obvious spam mails with malware in them is over. Today, the mails and sites with infection look just as original and trustworthy as any other and you would be “happily” unaware of anything out of the ordinary going on. Until the reality hits in and the repercussions of the attack get real.

The biggest amount of vulnerabilities comes not from the operating system, but from 3rd party software. Exploit kits are in the wild only a few moments after a fix to a vulnerability is released.

Administrators currently don’t necessarily have visibility to what 3rd party software is installed. Keeping up with all the patches and updates for all used software, and making the necessary updates takes a lot of time and effort.  For example, this June alone, my colleagues counted well over 100 vulnerabilities just in the most common software for Windows workstations.

To make it more challenging, usually, after all the necessary updates are done, the admin has to start it all over again when new security updates are available. Often as soon as the next day…

The F-Secure experts can offer a solution: Software Updater not only studies the available patches, but also installs security updates automatically and covers both the operating system and 3rd party software. However, administrators can easily define exclusions for the automatic mode if and when necessary.

Cheers, Eija

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F-Secure employee wins Inventor of the Year

20 Patents in 14 Years: How An Award-Winning Inventor Finds His Groove

We wouldn't be F-Secure without the talented and passionate researchers in our Labs. And today we'd like you to meet one whose inquisitive nature has driven him to become an inventor - and a prolific one at that. In his 14-year career with F-Secure, Jarno Niemelä has racked up an impressive 20 patents to his name and has filed 100 patent applications in total. His achievements recently won the title of "Salaried Inventor of 2014" from a group of Finnish inventors' organizations. I sat down to chat with Jarno about where he gets his ideas, and his advice for others. What area do your inventions focus on? I mostly focus on methods to help detect malware on a system, or methods of preventing malware from entering the system in the first place. How do your ideas come about? Inventions mostly happen in the evening when I'm not at work, and not even trying to think about it. I'll be working on some problem at work, and usually a day or two later, when I'm doing something totally unrelated on my own time, it hits me. I understand the problem and come up with a solution. The gym is a really good place for inventions. What motivates you to keep on inventing new solutions?   Inventions just happen, pretty much. Whenever I'm able to define a problem, I'm usually always able to come up with a solution. I am lucky to be researching in areas with problems that others have not yet solved. I'll be honest, I don't really like patents that much personally. The fact is though, that companies without patents would pretty much be at the mercy of the competitors. So in my view, patents are basically company self defense. Patents keep things in balance. Were you curious about things growing up? I've always kind of been inventive. You cannot learn to become an inventor, it's either something that's in your nature or it's not. And then you need to hone the talent and learn how to work within the patent framework. Another thing that is very important is good basic education and knowledge about the field. I owe a lot to Metropolia University of Applied Sciences where I studied for my engineering degree. Do you have any advice for people who have this inventive nature and are interested in filing patents? It all starts from defining and understanding the problem. Without a thorough understanding of the problem, you can't come up with a solution. Also, when it comes to patents, it's important to know what has previously been done in your area, and be clear in exactly how your invention is different from those. Otherwise your patent can be easily rejected by the patent examiner. And finally, patents are a long process so you need patience. It can take three to five years to get a patent approved. So this is not for hasty people. What is that rock you're holding? It's my trophy, a piece of Finnish bedrock! Inventors are the bedrock of new products. Do you have any certain goals for your inventions? Before I retire I would like to have at least 50 patents to my name. - Well, he's off to a great start. Congratulations, Jarno! Follow Jarno on Twitter  

Nov 12, 2014
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Free public wi-fi Coffee Shop

Should you use a VPN?

The EFF has put together a handy guide on choosing the right VPN -- virtual private network -- that explains in simple terms why you'd want to use this type of software.   "It enables a computer to send and receive data across shared or public networks as if it is directly connected to the private network—benefiting from the functionality, security, and management policies of the private network," the guide explains. It goes on to clarify the three reasons people typically encrypt their data. Most people already using a VPN do so for the two reasons: They connect to a corporate network remotely or are attempting avoid Internet censorship in countries like China and Iran. But even if you're not using a VPN for business or digital freedom, there is a simple reason why you'd want to use a VPN. "You can also use a commercial VPN to encrypt your data as it travels over a public network, such as the Wi-Fi in an Internet café or a hotel," the EFF writes. I put together this flow chart that explains whether you're a candidate for this third reason to use a VPN: “A good number of open wi-fi providers take the time to tell you in their T&C that there are inherent risks with wireless communications and suggest using a VPN,” F-Secure Security Advisor Sean Sullivan said after we conducted a public Wi-Fi experiment. “So if you don’t take it from me, take it from them.” And even if you aren't on a public network, you may want a VPN to protect you from ubiquitous tracking elements like a perma-cookie. You can try our super simple Freedome VPN solution -- which also includes tracking protection and the ability to set up virtual locations -- free. [Image via Trevor Cummings | Flickr]

Nov 10, 2014
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