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25 Fellows for 25 Years: Jose Perez Alegre

2010_25th_timeline_web_images-23As we celebrate our 25th anniversary, we’re paying tribute to the women and men who helped build the success story that is F-Secure. You can experience that story here and help us fight malware in our anniversary arcade game.

Today we speak to Jose Perez Alegre — Senior Researcher, Anti-malware Technologies in F-Secure Labs.

Where were you 25 years ago?

I was in Madrid eating hundreds of Marie biscuits, according to my mother, and watching the children’s program “Sesame District”. At that time, I already started my Judo lessons, my belt was yellow-white and I was one of the strongest, I guess because of the amount of biscuits (: .

What’s surprised you most since you’ve joined F-Secure?

Definitely, the people. There are and there have been many professionals I had the luck to work with and share ideas along the years. Without a doubt, the most valuable asset of this company, hardworking people, motivated and eager for new challenges and innovation.

What’s your favorite piece of technology?

At the moment, I’m pretty happy with my new yellowish Nokia Lumia. I’m just learning about its inner workings to start playing with it. Maybe not the conventional “playing with your phone”, but as you may know already, the F-Secure Labs is full of geeks, cool ones.

What F-Secure memory is most irreplaceable to you?

The day I first came to see the office and join the sauna session. It was with a group of students from the University where we were attending a course being taught by F-Secure, as it does still today. That day, I made a couple of “tricky” questions during the presentations which ended up with the later visit to the office some weeks later to start the interview process, a very productive day.

How will the world be different in 25 years?

Hopefully still exciting. In my opinion, the advances and innovation in science, technology and medicine will let humanity to live longer, better and be connected to each other, physically or virtually, like never before. Energy, water, food and the environment will become more critical problems yet to solve, until then and beyond. And I hope, we will know by then what dark matter is?

What’s your 25th birthday wish for F-Secure?

Live long and prosper.

25 Fellows for 25 Years

Mikko Hypponen – 1991
Jyrki Airola — 1994
Pekka Usva — 1995
Kim Englund — 1996
Pirkka Palomäki — 1997

Ilkka Ranta — 1997
Veli-Jussi Kesti — 1998
Taneli Virtanen — 1999
Kalle Korpi — 2001
Mike Graham — 2001

Johan Jarl — 2002
Miska Repo– 2004
Cord Stukenberg — 2005
Morgan MacDonald — 2006
Suh Gim Goh –2010

Harri Kiljander — 2010
Orestis Kostakis — 2010
Pratima Potturu — 2010
Eric Wang – 2011
Ines Finisie – 2011

Timo Laaksonen — 2012
Gianni Pintonello — 2012
Wille Miljas — 2013

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