25 Fellows for 25 Years: Jose Perez Alegre

2010_25th_timeline_web_images-23As we celebrate our 25th anniversary, we’re paying tribute to the women and men who helped build the success story that is F-Secure. You can experience that story here and help us fight malware in our anniversary arcade game.

Today we speak to Jose Perez Alegre — Senior Researcher, Anti-malware Technologies in F-Secure Labs.

Where were you 25 years ago?

I was in Madrid eating hundreds of Marie biscuits, according to my mother, and watching the children’s program “Sesame District”. At that time, I already started my Judo lessons, my belt was yellow-white and I was one of the strongest, I guess because of the amount of biscuits (: .

What’s surprised you most since you’ve joined F-Secure?

Definitely, the people. There are and there have been many professionals I had the luck to work with and share ideas along the years. Without a doubt, the most valuable asset of this company, hardworking people, motivated and eager for new challenges and innovation.

What’s your favorite piece of technology?

At the moment, I’m pretty happy with my new yellowish Nokia Lumia. I’m just learning about its inner workings to start playing with it. Maybe not the conventional “playing with your phone”, but as you may know already, the F-Secure Labs is full of geeks, cool ones.

What F-Secure memory is most irreplaceable to you?

The day I first came to see the office and join the sauna session. It was with a group of students from the University where we were attending a course being taught by F-Secure, as it does still today. That day, I made a couple of “tricky” questions during the presentations which ended up with the later visit to the office some weeks later to start the interview process, a very productive day.

How will the world be different in 25 years?

Hopefully still exciting. In my opinion, the advances and innovation in science, technology and medicine will let humanity to live longer, better and be connected to each other, physically or virtually, like never before. Energy, water, food and the environment will become more critical problems yet to solve, until then and beyond. And I hope, we will know by then what dark matter is?

What’s your 25th birthday wish for F-Secure?

Live long and prosper.

25 Fellows for 25 Years

Mikko Hypponen – 1991
Jyrki Airola — 1994
Pekka Usva — 1995
Kim Englund — 1996
Pirkka Palomäki — 1997

Ilkka Ranta — 1997
Veli-Jussi Kesti — 1998
Taneli Virtanen — 1999
Kalle Korpi — 2001
Mike Graham — 2001

Johan Jarl — 2002
Miska Repo– 2004
Cord Stukenberg — 2005
Morgan MacDonald — 2006
Suh Gim Goh –2010

Harri Kiljander — 2010
Orestis Kostakis — 2010
Pratima Potturu — 2010
Eric Wang – 2011
Ines Finisie – 2011

Timo Laaksonen — 2012
Gianni Pintonello — 2012
Wille Miljas — 2013

More posts from this topic


Cyber Monday Mythbusting

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November 30, 2015

Why Cameron hates WhatsApp so much

It’s a well-known fact that UK’s Prime Minister David Cameron doesn’t care much about peoples’ privacy. Recently he has been driving the so called Snooper’s Charter that would give authorities expanded surveillance powers, which got additional fuel from the Paris attacks. It is said that terrorists want to tear down the Western society and lifestyle. And Cameron definitively puts himself in the same camp with statements like this: “In our country, do we want to allow a means of communication between people which we cannot read? No, we must not.” David Cameron Note that he didn’t say terrorists, he said people. Kudos for the honesty. It’s a fact that terrorist blend in with the rest of the population and any attempt to weaken their security affects all of us. And it should be a no-brainer that a nation where the government can listen in on everybody is bad, at least if you have read Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four. But why does WhatsApp occur over and over as an example of something that gives the snoops grey hair? It’s a mainstream instant messenger app that wasn’t built for security. There are also similar apps that focus on security and privacy, like Telegram, Signal and Wickr. Why isn’t Cameron raging about them? The answer is both simple and very significant. But it may not be obvious at fist. Internet was by default insecure and you had to use tools to fix that. The pre-Snowden era was the golden age for agencies tapping into the Internet backbone. Everything was open and unencrypted, except the really interesting stuff. Encryption itself became a signal that someone was of interest, and the authorities could use other means to find out what that person was up to. More and more encryption is being built in by default now when we, thanks to Snowden, know the real state of things. A secured connection between client and server is becoming the norm for communication services. And many services are deploying end-to-end encryption. That means that messages are secured and opened by the communicating devices, not by the servers. Stuff stored on the servers are thus also safe from snoops. So yes, people with Cameron’s mindset have a real problem here. Correctly implemented end-to-end encryption can be next to impossible to break. But there’s still one important thing that tapping the wire can reveal. That’s what communication tool you are using, and this is the important point. WhatsApp is a mainstream messenger with security. Telegram, Signal and Wickr are security messengers used by only a small group people with special needs. Traffic from both WhatsApp and Signal, for example, are encrypted. But the fact that you are using Signal is the important point. You stick out, just like encryption-users before. WhatsApp is the prime target of Cameron’s wrath mainly because it is showing us how security will be implemented in the future. We are quickly moving towards a net where security is built in. Everyone will get decent security by default and minding your security will not make you a suspect anymore. And that’s great! We all need protection in a world with escalating cyber criminality. WhatsApp is by no means a perfect security solution. The implementation of end-to-end encryption started in late 2014 and is still far from complete. The handling of metadata about users and communication is not very secure. And there are tricks the wire-snoops can use to map peoples’ network of contacts. So check it out thoroughly before you start using it for really hot stuff. But they seem to be on the path to become something unique. Among the first communication solutions that are easy to use, popular and secure by default. Apple's iMessage is another example. So easy that many are using it without knowing it, when they think they are sending SMS-messages. But iMessage’s security is unfortunately not flawless either.   Safe surfing, Micke   PS. Yes, weakening security IS a bad idea. An excellent example is the TSA luggage locks, that have a master key that *used to be* secret.   Image by Sam Azgor

November 26, 2015
Secure Wordpress site, mobile blogging, tablet by the bay

This is why you need to protect your WordPress username and password

If you run a Wordpress site, you know that criminals around the world would love to use it to spread malware. Last month, F-Secure Labs spike in "Flash redirectors" that automatically redirect the visitor to a site with the goal of infecting them with malware, in this case the Angler exploit kit. The source was compromised websites -- specifically Wordpress sites. This isn't a new find for the Labs but what is unique is one of the tactics of the attack -- seeking out Wordpress usernames. Why? "After obtaining the username, the only thing that the attacker would need to figure out is the password," Patricia from The Labs explains. "The tool used by the attacker attempted around 1200 passwords before it was able to successfully login." If you happen to have one of those passwords, bam. You site is serving up malware, which is not only harmful to your visitors, it can cost you tons of traffic as Google delists you. Keeping your server and plugins up to date is essential for avoiding most attacks. Beyond that, this attack points to the need to both protect your Wordpress username AND always use a unique, strong password. "Furthermore, in order to defend against this kind of WordPress attack, you should not use a WordPress admin account for publishing anything," Patricia notes. You can also protect your server from enumeration attacks that discover the usernames of your bloggers. To see how to do that, visit our News from the Labs blog. It's pretty amazing what people can figure out about you with just your login and password. But when you're running a website, which can be part or all of your livelihood, the only way to keep from handing criminals the key to your front door is to make sure your password can't be figured out by anyone but you. And turn on two-step authentication if you haven't already. Cheers, Jason

November 26, 2015