130917_F-Secure_graphics

Both women and men are ready for the cloud

Women and Men Are Hard To Tell Apart In The Cloud

Explore more infographics like this one on the web’s largest information design community – Visually.

 

Most of us are already enjoy the cloud whether we find it through Facebook, YouTube or a drive you can access anywhere at any time.

Now it seems that a majority of both women and men are ready for the cloud experience that makes it possible to have the same experience whether they’re on their phone, PC, tablet or TV.

A recent F-Secure survey* shows 64% of women and 63% of men say it would be useful to have all their content accessible on all their devices wherever they are. And 60% of men and 59% of women agree it would be useful to be able to manage in one place all the content from the varied online services they use.

Facebook is definitely most popular place to share content for both genders. But women use it more, with 39% of women uploading content to the social networking site at least once a week, to 34% of men. YouTube follows, and is slightly more popular with men, at 21% uploading content to it at least once a week, followed by 19% of women. For general Facebook use, women use the social network more than men, at 82% to 78%.

Which cloud services do you use? Are you ready for one experience on all of your devices?

Cheers,

Jason

*The F-Secure Digital Lifestyle Survey 2013 covered web interviews of 6,000 broadband subscribers aged 20–60 years from 15 countries: Germany, Italy, France, the UK, the Netherlands, Belgium, Sweden, Finland, Poland, the USA, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Australia and Malaysia. The survey was completed by GfK, April 2013.

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