finlandsunset

Want to avoid online fraud? Move to Finland

14% of people globally have fallen victim to online fraud that cost them money, according to the F-Secure Digital Lifestyle Survey 2013. Out of all the countries we surveyed, it seems people in the US and Malaysia had experienced the highest levels of fraud online, with 20% in those countries reporting they have been victims. Brazil, Australia and the UK followed closely behind, with 19%, 18% and 17%.

The lowest levels were in Belgium and Finland, with only 9% in each of those countries having lost money to online fraud.

In fact, European countries in general reported lower levels of online fraud that other countries, which could also explain why Europeans express less concern about online safety and potential fraud than Brazilians, Americans, Malaysians, and others. In Europe, 68% of people are concerned about being victims of fraud when shopping online, and 61% of people when banking online. In the rest of the countries surveyed, however, the numbers are 87% and 84% respectively.

Globally, more people are concerned about online safety when using computers than when using mobile devices and tablets. 69% of consumers are concerned about whether they are safe when using a computer or laptop for things like browsing, shopping, reading, mailing and gaming. 54% are concerned when using mobile devices, and only 43% with tablets.

What about you? How concerned are you about being frauded when going about your daily online activities? Which activities concern you the most?

Here are some tips to avoid becoming a victim:

  • Use a unique password for each account, with a mixture of letters, numbers and special characters
  • Only give your personal or financial information to reputable sites you know you can trust, and only on pages with “HTTPS” in the URL
  • Avoid doing purchasing or banking from shared or public computers, or over public WiFi
  • Watch out for phishing emails that pretend to be your bank or another organization
  • Don’t click on links or open attachments in suspicious emails
  • Make sure your browser and software are up-to-date
  • If you have kids, be aware of what your child is clicking. Many “offers” are designed to look like entertainment for children
  • Beware of offers that seem too good to be true – they probably are
  • Review your bank and credit card statements regularly to make sure no transactions are happening without your knowledge
  • Use Internet security software from a trusted company like F-Secure. F-Secure Internet Security provides the best protection for your computer and online life, blocking viruses, spyware and malware and protecting you while banking, shopping and surfing. You can try it for free here.

Cheers,

Melissa

[Image by strzelec via Flickr]

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