Do you have your door open for malware attacks?

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The number of exploit attacks against known vulnerabilities continues to increase. The target is to install malware into the targeted system and to gain benefits for the criminals behind the attack.

According to F-Secure Threat Report H1/2013, the majority of Top 10 detections from the last six months involved exploits. Java is the most popular entry point and therefore, disallowing Java plug-ins might make sense.  Java vulnerabilities have allowed attackers to use even classic forms of attack, known for about ten years already.

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The table clearly shows that the users do not seem to understand the importance of security patches since exploits can target vulnerabilities that have had a patch for over 5 years!

On the other hand, exploit kits find their way to the market unbelievably fast – the F-Secure Threat report tells: “Java vulnerability CVE-2013-2423; a Metasploit module targeting this was first published on April 20th, and a day later we noticed in-the-wild attacks against it had already gotten underway by the CrimeBoss exploit kit”.

Why is it so hard to keep pace with the critical security updates then?

First, the number of patches releases is huge. For example, Microsoft alone recently published 13 patches against 47 bugs in its Patch Tuesday security update. Add to that the Java updates, Adobe updates, and all the rest of the products, and the number of necessary updates in a business environment can be devastating. Second – would the IT administrator always know which software is installed on which machine?

F-Secure Software Updater, an automated patch management tool integrated in the security clients, can help manage the huge task of keeping on top of the critical security updates. It follows the philosophy: find it, fix it, and forget it.

Cheers, Eija

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