Would you trust Finland?

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younitedI’m proud to tell you about younited, F-secure’s brand new personal cloud service. Actually so new that it isn’t open for the public yet. But you can sign up to be a tester at younited.com. We will start to send invitations to registered users in November, and the service is scheduled to open to the public in early 2014.

Why younited? It is our vision about how cloud storage can be made engaging, fun and safe. It’s a supercloud that collects data from your other cloud services and helps you manage it in one place. It’s also built for privacy from the ground up. The second argument is certainly a hot topic right now so it’s only natural that younited has gained a lot of attention.

Larry Seltzer of ZDNet joined the party with a slightly critical article. He is asking why anyone should trust Finland and why we should care about the privacy of our cloud storage in the first place. The first question is excellent. Users should definitively care about where their data is stored. That’s why we created younited here in Finland as an alternative to the American services. Let’s clear out Larry’s doubts and see why Finland is an excellent home for your data:

  • Finland’s constitution has a significantly stronger protection of individuals’ privacy than what US has.
  • Finland does not have a clear distinction between own citizens and foreigners in privacy issues like the US has. Your data on younited is protected as well as mine.
  • Finland is consistently rated at the top of international surveys on transparency, lack of corruption, education and innovation, just to name a few.
  • Finland is not panicking about terrorism. This means that we have no need to reduce peoples’ fundamental rights to ensure our security.
  • Finland’s signal intelligence capabilities are minimal compared to US.
  • Finland is not perfect when it comes to transparency and control of the authorities, but the problems we have are really minimal compared to US.
  • Finland does not have a massive system for silencing persons who are forced to assist authorities. There are no National Security Letters over here.

Yes, the unknown is scary. And Finland is unknown to most people. But I can assure you that Finland really is among the best places on earth if you are looking for a safe haven for your personal data.

So a non-US service should be the primary choice if you are outside US and even a little bit privacy aware. And that’s after all most of the world’s population, about 96% are living elsewhere. But what if you are American, like Larry? Is it still a good idea to go off-shore?

Most of the cloud storage service are located in US and you may prefer domestic services. That’s the easy choice. But services overseas can really provide a significant benefit privacy-wise. First remember the four-hop principle. You think you have decent privacy protection as an US citizen, but are you sure that no friend-of-friend-of-friend-of-a-friend is suspected for some obscure reason? That would put you in the same boat as all us aliens. And the US authorities are not exactly open about what they are doing. This is what they have been forced to admit, it’s certainly not the full picture. Also keep in mind that your data is most vulnerable when stored. NSA can still attempt to snoop at your encrypted data connection to younited before it exits US, but that’s quite futile (see note below). And it’s finally game over once your data is on our disks here in Finland under a layer of AES-encryption. So an overseas service eliminates the by far easiest attack point.

You have nothing to hide? Yes, we hear that argument frequently. And it is of course good to be a decent citizen with no secrets. But are you really sure? First, no one can remember all documents and mails they have received and sent. I bet most people have items they rather not share with strangers, even if they can’t remember them right away. Second, we are changing and the world is changing around us. How can you tell that everything you do today is still in line with your profession, role and personality after 20 years? Is what you do today OK by our society’s standards at that time? No, nobody can of course be sure about that. So why take risks when there are easy ways to reduce our digital footprint?

Larry is also pointing out that we have the right to protect our data, but not necessary the need to do it. True. But if you don’t use that right, you are signaling that it isn’t important and can be taken away. And there are plenty of powers that would love to take it. In other words, it’s a lot easier to ban crypto and other privacy measures if they are used by criminals only. Let’s not contribute to a world without the right to use privacy protection.

So why not follow Larry Seltzer’s example and sign up for younited right away. Do you fall in love with the service of its level of safety and privacy, or for the engaging and fun user experience? Or both?

Safe surfing,
Micke

Note about encryption of data in transfer. There’s constant speculation about if NSA can break the SSL/TLS encryption that is used for this kind of connections. There are indications that they have succeeded in some cases, but this typically involve outdated implementations, software modules that have been weakened on purpose or keys that have been shared with NSA by the service owner. NSA’s ability to break full-strength SSL/TLS is speculative, and any such attack would, if possible, require so much resources that only a small number of targets could be followed. Summary: Ordinary people can consider the encrypted link to younited as perfectly safe.

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