mikko

Mikko Hypponen on the Internet in 2014: “We’re losing the utopia”

As 2013 winds to a close, there’s no denying it’s been a fascinating year – and no one agrees more than Mikko Hypponen, malware adventurer, famed TED speaker, and F-Secure’s Chief Research Officer. But how will the extraordinary events of 2013 influence the Internet in 2014? I sat down with Mr. Hypponen to hear his thoughts about the Snowden revelations, crypto currencies and the hidden Web.

 

How will the Internet change as a result of Snowden’s revelations?

The Web came around 20 years ago. For the first 15 years of the Web, we lived in a sort of utopia where there really were no borders, no distances, no geographies, no countries. People couldn’t care less about where their data was stored. For once, we had something truly global.

What I’m seeing happening right now is we are losing this utopia, and the reason is that this wholesale espionage is being used against the citizens of the world. So people are starting to ask questions like where is my data stored, under which country’s laws, which country is this software coming from. These are questions nobody was asking 20 years ago, and this is a really sad development because this great global Internet is becoming shattered and broken down by country lines. So in 2014 and beyond this segregation of the Internet will continue.

 

What’s the worst case scenario?

The worst case is the Internet becoming a series of disconnected islands because people don’t trust foreign countries anymore, especially powerful countries like the USA. Basically complete breaking of the global trust.

 

And the best case?

Best case is that Snowden keeps leaking explosive stuff about wrongdoings of the US intelligence agencies. Eventually he leaks such bad stuff that the revelations outweigh whatever Snowden himself has done. He’s forgiven by the US people, he receives a hero’s welcome at home, the US intelligence agencies are brought back under control, and everybody wins.

 

How should people change how they use the Web in 2014 because of the revelations?

One thing that I said during my TEDxBrussels talk in October was that people shouldn’t be worried, they should be outraged. Fighting this sort of thing with technical measures is hard. If change is going to happen, it’s going to happen through political change and international pressure.

But as far as technical things, my advice is to use encryption everywhere, use strong passwords or a password manager (like F-Secure Key), use cloud services from countries that aren’t conducting wholesale blanket surveillance. Use the same good computing hygiene that you would use to protect yourself from computer crime and malware.

 

So on the whole, is it good that Snowden did what he did?

Absolutely it’s a good thing. Regardless of Snowden’s motives, he did us a favor by revealing the details of these intelligence agencies. Because they are out of control. The fact that they undermine encryption algorithms makes us all less secure.

 

What do you think about whistleblowing in general?

Protecting valid whistleblowers is very important because they alert us to wrongdoing that would otherwise never have been revealed.

 

All these companies like Google and Facebook say they have not been complying with and didn’t know anything about PRISM. What do you think?

I don’t believe these companies are voluntarily cooperating. When Google says “we are not giving data to the NSA” I believe them. I believe most of these companies are victims themselves. I believe they are getting breached by their own government.

 

What do you think is the US intelligence agencies’ ultimate goal? Do you think their goal is to protect America from terrorism, or is it something more sinister?

I don’t think it’s either. I don’t think the people working inside the NSA are evil people with some sinister plot. I believe they’re trying to fulfill their mission which is to provide signals intelligence. They are fulfilling their mission – but the problem is, they seem to be willing to go to any lengths to do it. They’ve lost their way. They’ve lost sight of their original goals, they’ve become too powerful and they’re out of control. It’s not just about terrorism either, or why would they be tapping Angela Merkel’s phone?

 

Any other predictions for 2014?

On a different subject entirely, I think 2014 will be the year when crypto currencies like Bitcoin switch from being something that only geeks are aware of to something that regular people know about. The age of virtual, crypto currencies is finally here and it’s long overdue. The one to go mainstream might not be Bitcoin, but maybe a clone or son of it. Of course, just like cash, Bitcoin can be used for good and for bad. And we’re seeing the use for bad in the online crime world.

In April I noted on Twitter when Bitcoin value had reached 100 US dollars, and I predicted it would break $1000 by the end of the year. Today it’s $980. Good call!

 

(Bitcoin broke $1000 a few days after this interview)

 

And what about the hidden Web, or deep Web we’ve been hearing about lately?

When the Web originated, the powers that be didn’t see the importance of the Internet. Now the powers that be are trying to control it as much as they can, which means the whole Internet is changing, and we’re fighting for its future.

We’re seeing people who still want to be free on the Web moving to the hidden Web, which will be brought under control as well, in time. And bad things are happening on the hidden Web for sure, but that doesn’t mean the whole thing is bad. People think it’s bad, but that’s what they used to think about the traditional Web as well.

 

See more of Mikko’s recent comments:

TEDx Brussels talk: How the NSA Betrayed the World’s Trust – Time to Act

Reuters TV interview: In Cloud We Trust

Reuters TV interview: Bitcoin – the Latest Front in Cybercrime

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Freedome now provides one-button VPN protection for iOS 8 — and Asia

This has been a huge week for Freedome. First we added virtual locations in Hong Kong and Singapore. Then the app became available across Asia. Now we're fully iOS 8-compatible on day one. You could use Freedome to protect your private data and choose from 12 different virtual locations on iOS 7. But it could be a hassle, requiring you to switch profiles or possibly lose connection. On iOS 8, your Freedome VPN connects and stays connected. That's it. How does it work? This video walks you through the process of pressing one button and getting on with your life. This simplicity is now available to a huge percentage of the world's population that hasn't had a chance to try out Freedome for free. “As hundreds of millions of users in Asia are hopping online through their broadband wireless and hundreds of Wi-Fi hotspots covering cafes to airports, mobile users are seeking ways to provide more privacy to their online surfing habits, Freedome will be the answer to this," our Security Advisor Su Gim Goh said. Beyond protecting your data when you're connecting on unsecured networks, Freedome offers anti-tracking protection that cloaks your data from the sites you choose to use. “Users in Asia today demand their rights to keeping their data private," he said. "Most important of all, with F-Secure’s Freedome, you're not leaving digital footprints on websites like online stores and social media sites, making them more untrackable to the aggressive advertising and profiling services on the Internet in this region."

Sep 18, 2014
BY Jason
Unbenannt-1

16 ways SAFE protects your devices, your family and you

In the early twenty-first century, when hackers were mostly pranksters, having security software on your PC was mostly about saving you some trouble. In 2014, international crime syndicates regularly co-opt millions of computers in order to systematically steal banking information, take identities and hold files for ransom, security isn't about convenience. It's about giving our families the freedom to live our lives online with out the threat of strangers invading our lives, hijacking our time and money. An anti-virus on one PC is a good step. But who just uses one PC now? Many of us three different devices before breakfast. That's why we created F-Secure SAFE -- it's built to protect all the devices and all of the people in your family. The latest update of SAFE is designed to make it easier to install on infected computers for a smoother overall experience. It also gives your tools to keep your devices and family safe wherever they go. Since SAFE is such a dramatic expansion of what our traditional F-Secure Internet Security does we wanted to cover 16 ways it protects you, your family and your devices. And to celebrate the new SAFE launch, we're giving away one SAFE hoodie and a free year of SAFE on our Facebook page every day for 16 days beginning on September 16. Please read the rules and enter now. Here's how SAFE protects you, your devices and your family: PCs and laptops 1. Protection against ransomware Thanks to browsing protection, F-Secure SAFE protects you against malicious software that impersonates authorities, such as Interpol or the FBI, and may block your computer, demanding ransom for unblocking it and preventing you from accessing your files until you pay. Thanks to F-Secure SAFE, all known versions of this insidious type of malware can't get on your computer. 2. Protect your home computer in the same way your office computer is protected Your office computer is protected by software that safeguards it against viruses and protects corporate data against theft by criminals. SAFE gives you the same options on your home computer. 3. Limit the time your children spend on the Internet. If you think that your children may spend too much time browsing the internet or playing online games, SAFE will let you decide for how many hours they are allowed to do it every day. You can easily define in which hours exactly they connect to the Internet. If they try to go online during unapproved times, the computer will not connect to the Internet. 4. Online banking protection your bank knows you need Do you know that most banks recommend in terms of security is using paid anti-virus software when banking online? SAFE ensures you meet these recommendations. 5. Safeguard your memories  F-Secure Safe protects the photos and videos of your children or grandchildren against falling into the wrong hands. The built-in anti-virus application and protection against as-yet-unknown threats ensure that all of the memories collected on your computer are fully protected. Your files will never be destroyed, encoded to demand payment for decoding them, or intercepted in order to be published or to gain profit from distributing them. 6. Protect your children against adult content Define which sort of content can be accessed by your children, whether you're monitoring them or not. 7. Shop online without worry Thanks to protection against spyware and browsing protection, your credit card number is invisible to criminals. Now you can relax when shopping online, booking hotels or buying air tickets. Tablets 1. Control which apps your kids can install Keep games that involve virtual violence, sex or gambling off your child's device with a simple setting. 2. Decide which sites your child can visit  Even if they use tablets in their rooms, you can be sure that they visit no websites inappropriate for their age. 3. Protect your device against malware with browsing protection. Protect yourself from phishing scams, ransomware and malicious apps that could be triggered by visiting the wrong site. 4. Keep login data and online banking passwords secure SAFE protects your tablet against spyware that steals your bank login data. Smartphones 1. Find your missing phone. Locate your lost phone and make sure no one can access your data should your device be stolen. 2. Find your child Check the location of your child’s phone from our simple web portal. 3. Avoid surprising charges Are you concerned that your children may install games than require additional payments? F-Secure Safe lets you control which software is installed on their phones. 4. Block calls and text messages from unwanted numbers Start your own "Do not call" list with this feature that allows you decide who has access to you through your phone. 5. Keep your phone malware free More than 99 percent of all mobile malware targets Android, which is the second most targeted platform in the world behind Windows. With SAFE, you have protection from increasingly complex ransomware and trojans designed to get inside your phone then your wallet. You can try F-Secure SAFE for free now. Cheers, Sandra

Sep 15, 2014
Unbenannt-2

Why your Apple Watch will probably never be infected by malware

On Tuesday Apple announced its latest iPhone models and a new piece of wearable technology some have been anxiously waiting for -- Apple Watch. TechRadar describes the latest innovation from Cupertino as "An iOS 8-friendly watch that plays nice with your iPhone." And if it works like your iPhone, you can expect that it will free of all mobile malware threats, unless you decide to "jailbreak" it. The latest F-Secure Labs Threat Report clears up one big misconception about iOS malware: It does exist, barely. In the first half of 2014, 295 new families and variants or mobile malware were discovered – 294 on Android and one on iOS.  iPhone users can face phishing scams and Wi-Fi hijacking, which is why we created our Freedome VPN, but the threat of getting a bad app on your iOS device is almost non-existent. "Unlike Android, malware on iOS have so far only been effective against jailbroken devices, making the jailbreak tools created by various hacker outfits (and which usually work by exploiting undocumented bugs in the platform) of interest to security researchers," the report explains. The iOS threat that was found earlier this year, Unflod Baby Panda, was designed to listen to outgoing SSL connections in order to steal the device’s Apple ID and password details. Apple ID and passwords have been in the news recently as they may have played a role in a series of hacks of celebrity iCloud accounts that led to the posting of dozens of private photos. Our Mikko Hypponen explained in our latest Threat Report Webinar that many users have been using these accounts for years, mostly to purchase items in the iTunes store, without realizing how much data they were actually protecting. But Unflod Baby Panda is very unlikely to have played any role in the celebrity hacks, as "jailbreaking" a device is still very rare. Few users know about the hack that gives up the protection of the "closed garden" approach of the iOS app store, which has been incredibly successful in keeping malware off the platform, especially compared to the more open Android landscape. The official Play store has seen some infiltration by bad apps, adware and spamware -- as has the iOS app store to a far lesser degree -- but the majority of Android threats come from third-party marketplaces, which is why F-Secure Labs recommends you avoid them. The vast majority of iPhone owners have never had to worry about malware -- and if the Apple Watch employs the some tight restrictions on apps, the device will likely be free of security concerns. However, having a watch with the power of a smartphone attached to your body nearly twenty-four hours a day promises to introduce privacy questions few have ever considered.    

Sep 9, 2014
BY Jason