Enter your password

5 reasons people use embarrassingly simple passwords

Big news!The world’s most popular password is no longer “password”!

It’s the much more complicated “123456”!

What’s shocking about lists of passwords that come out annually or whenever there is a big data heist is how much they don’t change. Most people, it seems, use the same terrible passwords over and over again no matter how many times we try to scare them out of it.

Why does this happen? Here are some simple reasons.


1. You have so many accounts that need passwords.

your password is incorrect dr heckle funny wtf anchorman memes

In 2011, the average internet user had to remember 10 passwords a day. And that was 3 years ago. We’ve all created hundreds of online accounts. For most of these, people seem to use the same passwords over and over, which isn’t a big deal unless…

2. You don’t differentiate between important and unimportant accounts.
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Certain accounts require far more secure passwords than others. Not only should all of your most important accounts — online banking, email, credit cards — each have their own unique password, you should make sure that you never use your work passwords for your personal accounts. Imagine the nightmare of realizing your personal hack put your work security in danger. For that reason you shouldn’t use your work email as a contact for non-work accounts either.


3. Good passwords are hard to remember.
You can’t use any word from the dictionary, any term on your social media profiles, it much include a character, a symbol, the square root of Pi divided by nine…

XKCD delved into the intricacies and absurdities of password creation best:

password_strength


4. You’ve gotten away with it for this long.
The biggest reason that we don’t change is that we don’t have to. Even when people get their email hacked, they often just change that password and go on as nothing happened because the consequences aren’t bad enough yet.


5. You don’t use a password manager.
Creating and remembering strong, unique passwords is hard. Password managers make it easy. That’s why F-Secure Labs suggests that you start using one now. And, of course, we recommend that you use ours: F-Secure Key.

[Image via marc falardeau via Flickr.com.]

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MMMMMMMMM! The sweet taste of history

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