Mikko Hyppönen

Why Edward Snowden Gives Me Hope

Exactly one year ago today, we saw the very first of the Snowden leaks. One year later, the world has changed a lot – for the better. In a recent talk I gave, I called the past year “Year 1 A.S. – After Snowden.” The Snowden revelations are that important to the digital world.

Before Snowden, the world was simpler. There was a certain innocence we hadn’t lost yet. People weren’t thinking much about things like where their data is stored. People were happily using services without much thought as to what country hosted it. Since Snowden, we’ve lost that innocence. We’re now much more aware of the privacy implications of the Internet services we use, and how where they’re from affects our own privacy. We’re now aware that whatever we do online is being tracked and followed.

That awareness is a very good thing. We should be having this conversation. We should be talking about privacy, security, the capabilities of technology, how it should be used, and the role of governments and corporations. The issues are complex. There are no easy answers.

Is Snowden a traitor, or a patriot to his country? The Americans can decide, and I hope they decide in his favor. Yes, he broke the trust of his employer and his NDA. But in the end he did the right thing.

Snowden could have put his head in the sand and continued to receive his very nice paycheck, or he could have simply walked away silently. But he didn’t. What he did do, was risk everything to give us a great gift: the opportunity to have this debate on the world stage. Without him we wouldn’t have been pushed to face these important and defining questions.

Are you fed up with mass surveillance? With having your digital privacy violated? Then make yourself a part of the conversation. F-Secure is giving you the chance to make your voice heard today. Share your thoughts and ideas in our #digitalfreedom manifesto. It’s a crowdsourced document that will be used to help advance digital freedom in the world. Join together with everyone who cares about digital freedom and privacy to make a difference. The manifesto is licensed under creative commons. It’s open for contributions until June 30. You can contribute here.

I hope we see more Snowdens from other world powers. Other countries are doing similar surveillance too, we just don’t have concrete evidence about it yet. But I’m glad there are people out there who have the integrity and the ideals to stand up against what’s wrong, no matter the cost.

And that’s why Edward Snowden gives me hope.

 

 

More posts from this topic

groupmeeting

Why You May Want to Disable Location Services for Facebook

When news broke that Facebook was at least temporarily using users physical location to suggest real world connections, a strategy that has been employed by the NSA, the backlash was sharp.  It wasn't difficult to imagine scenarios when identities could be inadvertently and uncomfortably revealed through group therapy, 12-step meetings or secretive political movements. The world's most popular social network quickly said it would not continue what it called a small-scale test nor roll the feature on a wider scale in the future. But Facebook is still using your location data for other purposes, Fusion's Kashmir Hill reports: We do know that Facebook is using smartphone location for other things, such as tracking which stores you go to and geotargeting you with ads, but the social network now says it’s not using smartphone location to identify people you’ve been physically proximate to. Hill notes that using location to match users up, thus acting as a tool to reveal the identity of nearby strangers, might violate Facebook's agreement with the Federal Trade Commission . So you should expect that your location -- like everything you do on Facebook -- is being used to turn you into a better product for its advertisers. That's the cost of using a "free" site but you can limit your exposure a bit by turning off location services for Facebook on your phone. Here's very simple instructions for turning off location services on your Facebook and Facebook Messenger apps on your Android of iOS device. Do you mind if Facebook uses your location to suggest new friends? Let us know in the comments. [Image by Lwp Kommunikáció | Flickr]

June 30, 2016
Juhannus

How To Prepare Yourself and Your Phone For Juhannus

In Finland, there is this thing called juhannus. A few years ago, our former colleague Hetta described it like this: Well, Midsummer – or juhannus – as it is called in Finnish, is one of the most important public holidays in our calendar. It is celebrated, as you probably guessed, close to the dates of the Summer Solstice, when day is at its longest in the northern hemisphere. Finland being so far up north, the sun doesn’t set on juhannus at all. Considering that in the winter we get the never ending night, it’s no surprise we celebrate the sun not setting. So what do Finns do to celebrate juhannus? I already told you we flock to our summer cottages, but what then? We decorate the cottage with birch branches to celebrate the summer, we stock up on new potatoes which are just now in season and strawberries as well. We fire up the barbecue and eat grilled sausages to our hearts content. We burn bonfires that rival with the unsetting sun. And we get drunk. If that isn't vivid enough, this video may help: [protected-iframe id="f18649f0b62adf8eb1ec638fa5066050-10874323-9129869" info="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fsuomifinland100%2Fvideos%2F1278272918868972%2F&show_text=0&width=560" width="560" height="315" frameborder="0" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no"] And because the celebration is just so... celebratory, it's easy to lose your phone. So here are a few ways to prepare yourself for a party that lasts all night. 1. Don't use 5683 as your passcode. That spells love and it's also one of the first passcodes anyone trying to crack into your phone will try. So use something much more creative -- and use a 6-digit code if you can on your iPhone. You can also encrypt your Android. 2. Write down your IMEI number. If you lose your phone, you're going to need this so make sure you have it written down somewhere safe. 3. Back your content up. This makes your life a lot easier if your party goes too well and it's pretty simple on any iOS device. Just make sure you're using a strong, unique password for your iCloud account. Unfortunately on an Android phone, you'll have to use a third-party app. 4. Maybe just leave it home. Enjoy being with your friends and assume that they'll get the pictures you need to refresh your memory. And while you're out you can give your phone a quick internal "clean" with our free Boost app. [Image by Janne Hellsten | Flickr]

June 22, 2016