Safe online while travelling

11 ways to stay SAFE online when you’re traveling

If you bring your phone, tablet or laptop with you when you travel, there’s one thing to keep in mind: public WiFi networks are public.

“That open Wi-Fi connection opens the door for hackers,” writes NPR’s Steve Henn. “They can get in the middle of transactions between, say, you and your bank.”

Because you’re sharing the network with strangers, there’s the risk that someone is using readily available software that snoops on what you’re doing.

“It may feel private because you’re using your personal device, but it’s not,” our Security Advisor Sean Sullivan told us last year.

Sean advises against doing anything via public WiFi that you wouldn’t want an eavesdropper to know – including logging into accounts with passwords.

Before you hit the road make sure all your devices are backed up, your applications and operating system are patched and you’re running an updated security solution on any device you can.

You can try F-Secure SAFE on up to 3 devices for free for the next month.

Here are some more tips that will keep you secure wherever you may roam:

• Don’t let your device connect to public WiFi spots automatically.
• Delete out the WiFi access points you’ve used when you arrive home.
• Log out of all your apps you don’t need while traveling.
• Lock any device you’re your using with a code that can’t be guessed.
• Be aware of your surroundings and anyone who could be trying to peek over your shoulder.
• Use a unique, strong password for each account.
• For laptops, disable file sharing and turn on the firewall, setting it to block incoming connections.
• Use a VPN (virtual private network) like Freedome if possible, which secures your connection even on public WiFi.
• Use a travel router with a prepaid SIM card for your own personal WiFi network.
• At the very least, watch for the padlock and “https” in the address bar for any site with your personal information. If they’re not there, avoid the site.
• A good general rule: Assume anything you do over public WiFi is part of a public conversation.

Cheers,

Sandra

[Image by Mario Mancuso via Flickr]

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