RIGHT TO BE FORGOTTEN

Right to be forgotten – good or bad?

Have you ever Binged or Googled for your own name, address or phone number? It’s good to do it now and then, and the result may be shocking. You don’t have to be a celebrity to be mentioned on the net. Most of us occur on the net in quite many places, often a lot more than we imagine.

You can decide how much you reveal to the public in the profiles of your own accounts. But that’s not the full picture. Every time you participate in something under your own name, it may be published on the net, with or without your consent. This kind of publicity is hard to track, and next to impossible to control.

This is what the European court of justice (ECJ) tried to control in a ruling in May 2014. In short, a man from Spain found previously published data to be embarrassing and outdated. The site refused to take down the data and Spanish authorities ruled that there was no legal ground to demand deletion of the lawfully published content. The European court did however rule in favor of him and demanded Google to hide these pages in search results. According to the court, Google has to delete “inadequate, irrelevant or no longer relevant” data from search results.

I’m an advocate of digital privacy and our rights to control our digital footprint. And this is sort of a win for privacy-fighters. But I have mixed feelings about this decision and will not open any sparkling bottles. I think the track that ECJ has entered will turn out to be a dead end.

First of all, trying to create ways to control net content is good. We are dealing with a delicate balance between freedom of speech and peoples’ right to privacy. But most of us probably agree that a net totally without content control isn’t desirable.

But trying to solve this problem with the search engine companies is like creating a giant reality distortion field. The data does not go anywhere even if it’s hidden in Google searches. As a matter of fact, all you have to do is to use a non-European version of Google. And that’s not all. Google is even planning to inform users that items have been hidden from the search result they are viewing. Convenient with a reminder that you should search again with the US version, isn’t it?

Search engines are of great importance for what pages we find and read. But many are probably overestimating this importance now when social media is getting more popular. Nowadays we do not only find our stuff by searching, a significant part is virally spreading links. These links also bypass the reality distortion field totally.

The right to be forgotten is a great principle. But I think it should be restricted to the actual content and not services that help you find it. What we need is a globally working system for content take-down requests. These requests need to be approved by some kind of authority and the system must have built-in safeguards against misuse for censorship. Yes, keep in mind the delicate balance between freedom of speech and privacy. The neutrality of search engines should at the same time be controlled and guaranteed. If something is wrong, let’s fix reality instead of creating a reality distortion field.

Congratulations anyway to Mario Costeja González who won the case against Google. That’s an achievement even if the outcome is questionable. And the funny thing is naturally that you would have no clue who Mario Costeja González is, and that his house had to be sold to pay debts, without this thing called right to be forgotten.

BTW, if your search turned up something you don’t like and you are a European citizen, then you can continue to Googles removal process. We don’t know yet how this will work when the masses start to request removals. The process will probably be an uphill battle, so don’t hold your breath. It will be interesting to see how this develops.

 

Micke

 

Image by stockimages @ freedigitalphotos.net

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What is a supercookie and why is it more important than you think?

Many techie terms in the headlines lately. Supercookies, supertrackers, HTTP headers and X-UIDH. If you just skim the news you will learn that this is some kind of new threat against our privacy. But what is it really? Let’s dig a bit deeper. We will discover that this is an issue of surprisingly big importance. Cookies are already familiar to most of us. These are small pieces of information that a web server can ask our browser to store. They are very useful for identifying users and managing sessions. They are designed with security and privacy in mind, and users can control how these cookies are used. In short, they are essential, they can be a privacy problem but we have tools to manage that threat. What’s said above is good for us ordinary folks, but not so good for advertisers. Users get more and more privacy-aware and execute their ability to opt out from too excessive tracking. The mobile device revolution has also changed the game. More and more of our Internet access is done through apps instead of the browser. This is like using a separate “browser” for all the services we use, and this makes it a lot harder to get an overall picture of our surfing habits. And that’s exactly what advertisers want, advertising is like a lottery with bad odds unless they know who’s watching the ad. A new generation of supercookies (* were developed to fight this trend. It is a piece of information that is inserted in your web traffic by your broadband provider. Its purpose is to identify the user from whom the traffic comes. And to generate revenue for the broadband provider by selling information about who you really are to the advertisers. These supercookies are typically used on mobile broadband connections where the subscription is personal, meaning that all traffic on it comes from a single person. So why are supercookies bad? They are inserted in the traffic without your consent and you have no way to opt out. They are not visible at all on your device so there is no way to control them by using browser settings or special tools. They are designed to support advertisers and generate revenue for the mobile broadband provider. Your need for privacy has not been a design goal. They are not domain-specific like ordinary cookies. They are broadcasted to any site you communicate with. They were designed to remain secret. They are hidden in an obscure part of the header information that very few web administrators need to touch. There are two ways to pay for Internet services, with money or by letting someone profile you for marketing purposes. This system combines both. You are utilized for marketing profit by someone you pay money to. But what can and should I do as an ordinary user? Despite the name, this kind of supercookies are technically totally different from ordinary cookies. The privacy challenges related with ordinary cookies are still there and need to be managed. Supercookies have not replaced them. Whatever you do to manage ordinary cookies, keep doing it. Supercookies are only used by some mobile broadband providers. Verizon and AT&T have been most in the headlines, but at least AT&T seems to be ramping down as a result of the bad press. Some other operators are affected as well. If you use a device with a mobile broadband connection, you can test if your provider inserts them. Go to this page while connected over the device’s own data connection, not WiFi. Check what comes after “Broadcast UID:”. This field should be empty. If not, then your broadband provider uses supercookies. Changing provider is one way to get rid of them. Another way is to use a VPN-service. This will encapsulate all your traffic in an encrypted connection, which is impossible to tamper with. We happen to have a great offering for you, F-secure Freedome. Needless to say, using Freedome on your mobile device is a good idea even if you are not affected by these supercookies. Check the site for more details. Last but not least. Even if you’re unaffected, as most of you probably are, this is a great reminder of how important net neutrality is. It means that any carrier that deliver your network traffic should do that only, and not manipulate it for their own profit. This kind of tampering is one evil trick, throttling to extort money from other businesses is another. We take neutrality and equal handling for granted on many other common resources in our society. The road network, the postal service, delivery of electricity, etc. Internet is already a backbone in society and will grow even more important in the future. Maintaining neutrality and fair rules in this network is of paramount importance for our future society.   Safe surfing, Micke   PS. The bad press has already made AT&T drop the supercookies, which is great. All others involved mobile broadband providers may have done the same by the time you are reading this. But this is still an excellent example of why net neutrality is important and need to be guaranteed by legislation.     (* This article uses the simplified term supercookie for the X-UIDH -based tracker values used by Verizon, AT&T and others in November 2014. Supercookie may in other contexts refer to other types of cookie-like objects. The common factor is that a supercookie is more persistent and harder to get rid of than an ordinary cookie.   Image by Jer Thorp  

Nov 18, 2014
BY 
F-Secure employee wins Inventor of the Year

20 Patents in 14 Years: How An Award-Winning Inventor Finds His Groove

We wouldn't be F-Secure without the talented and passionate researchers in our Labs. And today we'd like you to meet one whose inquisitive nature has driven him to become an inventor - and a prolific one at that. In his 14-year career with F-Secure, Jarno Niemelä has racked up an impressive 20 patents to his name and has filed 100 patent applications in total. His achievements recently won the title of "Salaried Inventor of 2014" from a group of Finnish inventors' organizations. I sat down to chat with Jarno about where he gets his ideas, and his advice for others. What area do your inventions focus on? I mostly focus on methods to help detect malware on a system, or methods of preventing malware from entering the system in the first place. How do your ideas come about? Inventions mostly happen in the evening when I'm not at work, and not even trying to think about it. I'll be working on some problem at work, and usually a day or two later, when I'm doing something totally unrelated on my own time, it hits me. I understand the problem and come up with a solution. The gym is a really good place for inventions. What motivates you to keep on inventing new solutions?   Inventions just happen, pretty much. Whenever I'm able to define a problem, I'm usually always able to come up with a solution. I am lucky to be researching in areas with problems that others have not yet solved. I'll be honest, I don't really like patents that much personally. The fact is though, that companies without patents would pretty much be at the mercy of the competitors. So in my view, patents are basically company self defense. Patents keep things in balance. Were you curious about things growing up? I've always kind of been inventive. You cannot learn to become an inventor, it's either something that's in your nature or it's not. And then you need to hone the talent and learn how to work within the patent framework. Another thing that is very important is good basic education and knowledge about the field. I owe a lot to Metropolia University of Applied Sciences where I studied for my engineering degree. Do you have any advice for people who have this inventive nature and are interested in filing patents? It all starts from defining and understanding the problem. Without a thorough understanding of the problem, you can't come up with a solution. Also, when it comes to patents, it's important to know what has previously been done in your area, and be clear in exactly how your invention is different from those. Otherwise your patent can be easily rejected by the patent examiner. And finally, patents are a long process so you need patience. It can take three to five years to get a patent approved. So this is not for hasty people. What is that rock you're holding? It's my trophy, a piece of Finnish bedrock! Inventors are the bedrock of new products. Do you have any certain goals for your inventions? Before I retire I would like to have at least 50 patents to my name. - Well, he's off to a great start. Congratulations, Jarno! Follow Jarno on Twitter  

Nov 12, 2014
BY