About Us

The first computer virus was discovered in 1986. It didn’t take long for people to realize that computers connected together would not only enable great things, but also make people and their data more vulnerable. Two years later in 1988, F-Secure was founded in Finland.

In today’s global environment, we take pride in our roots that embrace privacy, integrity and equality – and a little bit of “sisu” – that Finnish craziness to have the guts to challenge everything and anything necessary. These qualities have led us to where we are as a company.

Today the world is even more connected. You use your devices at home, at work and on the road. You create and share content wherever you go. And your digital life is of interest to everyone from cybercriminals to Internet marketers to governments. For us it means that we have an even bigger job to do. It’s about fighting for privacy and digital freedom. Your freedom.

It’s our passion for freedom that pushes us to create better products and services, so you can live your digital life without worries. For us, freedom is about making sure you are the one who is in control of your digital life.

At F-Secure, our job is to protect your content and your privacy everywhere. On a more fundamental level, it’s really about making sure technology acts as a liberator now and in the future. Together with you, we’re fighting for your freedom.

 

F-Secure – Switch on Freedom
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Our team

Sandra
F-Secure’s PR champion — equally obsessed with shoes and privacy.

Jason
A social media strategist with a passion for making complex issues simple.

Micke
Digital citizen, employed by F-Secure Labs, concerned about digital security and privacy, hobby photographer, sea lover, SAR volunteer.

Melissa
Content creator with an interest in the human side of security.

 

 

 

latest posts

graveyard, RIP Flash, Is Flash dead

RIP Flash? Has Chrome signed Flash’s death warrant?

The first day of September may go down in internet security history -- and not just because it's the day when F-Secure Labs announced that its blog, which was the first antivirus industry blog ever, has moved to a new home. It's also the day that Google's Chrome began blocking flash ads from immediately loading, with the goal of moving advertisers to develop their creative in HTML5. Google is joining Amazon, whose complete rejection of Flash ads also begins on September 1. "This is a very good move on Amazon’s part and hopefully other companies will follow suit sooner than later," F-Secure Security Advisor Sean Sullivan wrote in August when Amazon made its announcement. "Flash-based ads are now an all-too-common security risk. Everybody will be better off without them." Last month, Adobe issued its 12th update in 2015 for the software addressing security and stability concerns. An estimated 90 percent of rich media ads are delivered through Flash. Having the world's largest online retailer reject your ad format is a significant nudge away from the plugin. But it would be difficult to overstate the impact of Chrome actively encouraging developers to drop Flash. About 1 out of every 2 people, 51.74 percent, who access the internet through a desktop browser do it via Chrome, according to StatCounter. This makes it the world's most popular web interface by far.   Facebook's Chief Security Officer has also recently called for the end of Flash and YouTube moved away from the format by default in January. “Newer technologies are available and becoming more popular anyway, so it would really be worth the effort to just speed up the adoption of newer, more secure technologies, and stop using Flash completely," F-Secure Senior Researcher Timo Hirvonen told our Business Insider blog. So what's keeping Flash alive? Massive adoption and advertisers. “Everyone in every agency’s creative department grew up using Adobe’s creative suite, so agencies still have deep benches of people who specialize in this,”Media Kitchen managing partner Josh Engroff told Digiday. “Moving away from it means new training and calibration.” And Flash does have some advantages over the format that seems fated to replace it. "HTML5 ads may be more beautiful, and are perceived to be more secure, but the files can be a lot larger than Flash," Business Insider's Laura O'Reilly wrote. In markets, stability can breed instability and it seems that our familiarity and reliance on Flash has resulted in unnecessary insecurity for our data. Has Flash hit its moment when its dominance rapidly evaporates? We'll soon see. Cheers, Sandra [Image by Sean MacEntee | Flickr]    

September 1, 2015
smart lock, securing smart homes, security issues internet of things

6 reasons the Internet of Things is difficult to secure

It's a new world when we have to worry about our sprinklers getting hacked. While it's still easier to hack a smartphone or throw a brick through a window to get into our homes, the trend of connecting and automating almost everything presents a bevy of security concerns that many of us are just beginning to consider. In a recent post for our brand new Internet of Things blog, our Mika Stahlberg succinctly laid out the unique challenges for keeping our "things" safe: 1) Most of the devices are cheap and lack a screen and keyboard. 2) Ease-of-use, especially during setting up, is critical for these kinds of products. 3) Devices use wireless protocols to connect to the home, so that there is no need to install wires into the walls. Hence, they and their signals are likely also reachable from outside the walls of the house. 4) Some of these devices, like garden sprinklers or porch lamps, are located outside and hence can be accessed physically without breaking into your house. 5) There are many manufacturers and many ways to buy the device: Devices don’t come pre-installed with any secret code or certificate specifically for your home. 6) Many smart home devices use mesh networking where radios are low power and each device also acts as a relay station and thus devices need some way of communicating with all other devices in the network. If you want to know how you can get ahead of the curve, here are three keys make your smart home safer now. Cheers, Jason [Image by Maurizio Pesce | Flickr]

August 24, 2015
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Only 10% protected – Interesting study on travelers’ security habits

Kaisu who is working for us is also studying tourism. Her paper on knowledge of and behavior related to information security amongst young travelers was released in May, and is very interesting reading. The world is getting smaller. We travel more and more, and now we can stay online even when travelling. Using IT-services in unknown environments does however introduce new security risks. Kaisu wanted to find out how aware young travelers are of those risks, and what they do to mitigate them. The study contains many interesting facts. Practically all, 95,7%, are carrying a smartphone when travelling. One third is carrying a laptop and one in four a tablet. The most commonly used apps and services are taking pictures, using social networks, communication apps and e-mail, which all are used by about 90% of the travelers. Surfing the web follows close behind at 72%. But I’m not going to repeat it all here. The full story is in the paper. What I find most interesting is however what the report doesn’t state. Everybody is carrying a smartphone and snapping pictures, using social media, surfing the web and communicating. Doesn’t sound too exotic, right? That’s what we do in our everyday life too, not just when travelling. The study does unfortunately not examine the participants’ behavior at home. But I dare to assume that it is quite similar. And I find that to be one of the most valuable findings. Traveling is no longer preventing us from using IT pretty much as we do in our everyday life. I remember when I was a kid long, long ago. This was even before invention of the cellphone. There used to be announcements on the radio in the summer: “Mr. and Mrs. Müller from Germany traveling by car in Lapland. Please contact your son Hans urgently.” Sounds really weird for us who have Messenger, WhatsApp, Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat and Skype installed on our smartphones. There was a time when travelling meant taking a break in your social life. Not anymore. Our social life is today to an increasing extent handled through electronic services. And those services goes with us when travelling, as Kaisu’s study shows. So you have access to the same messaging channels no matter where you are on this small planet. But they all require a data connection, and this is often the main challenge. There are basically two ways to get the data flowing when abroad. You can use data roaming through the cellphone’s ordinary data connection. But that is often too expensive to be feasible, so WiFi offers a good and cheap alternative. Hunting for free WiFi has probably taken the top place on the list of travelers’ concerns, leaving pickpockets and getting burnt in the sun behind. Another conclusion from Kaisu’s study is that travelers have overcome this obstacle, either with data roaming or WiFi. The high usage rates for common services is a clear indication of that. But how do they protect themselves when connecting to exotic networks? About 10% are using a VPN and about 20% say they avoid public WiFi. That leaves us with over 70% who are doing something else, or doing nothing. Some of them are using data roaming, but I’m afraid most of them just use whatever WiFi is available, either ignoring the risks or being totally unaware. That’s not too smart. Connecting to a malicious WiFi network can expose you to eavesdropping, malware attacks, phishing and a handful other nasty tricks. It’s amazing that only 10% of the respondents have found the simple and obvious solution, a VPN. It stands for Virtual Private Network and creates a protected “tunnel” for your data through the potentially harmful free networks. Sounds too nerdy? No, it’s really easy. Just check out Freedome. It’s the super-simple way to be among the smart 10%.   Safe surfing, Micke   PS. I recently let go of my old beloved Nokia Lumia. Why? Mainly because I couldn’t use Freedome on it, and I really want the freedom it gives me while abroad.   Image by Moyan Brenn  

August 24, 2015
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