Terms

Terms and Conditions

Please note that when accessing The F-Secure World Wide Web pages you agree to the following terms:
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Disclaimer

The contents of F-Secure World Wide Web pages are provided “as is” and “as available”. No warranty of any kind, either express or implied, is made in relation to the availability, accuracy, reliability or content of these pages. To the extent permitted by law, F-Secure shall not be liable for any direct, indirect, incidental or consequential damages arising out of the use of or inability to use these pages, even if F-Secure has been advised of the possibility of such damages.


Third Party Sites

This policy only addresses our activities from our servers. This web site contains links to web sites that are not under our control. We are not responsible for the content, commentary or applications of these web sites. We are providing these links only as a convenience and the inclusion of these links does not imply endorsement by us of the linked web site.


Copyright

The contents of F-Secure World Wide Web pages are protected by international copyright laws © F-Secure 1994 – 2006. All rights reserved. Reproduction, transfer, distribution or storage of part, or all of the contents, including but not limited to pictures, design format, logo, audio clips, video clips and HTML coding, in any form without the prior written permission of F-Secure is prohibited. Any and all reproduction, total or partial, of the texts, illustrations, design format or logo by any means whatsoever, is illegal. Such reproduction requires the prior written consent of F-Secure. We protect our intellectual property rights to the full extent of the law. F-Secure” and the triangle symbol are registered trademarks of F-Secure Corporation and F-Secure product names and symbols/logos are either trademarks or registered trademarks of F-Secure Corporation.

All other trademarks mentioned in the F-Secure World Wide Web pages are the property of their respective holders. Nokia is a registered trademark and the Nokia OK logo is a trademark of Nokia Corporation. Nokia id-codes are a00014, a00015 and a00018. Symbian and all Symbian-based marks and logos are trade marks of Symbian Limited.


Security

F-Secure is committed to ensuring the security of your information. To prevent unauthorized access or disclosure, maintain data accuracy, and ensure the appropriate use of information, we have put in place appropriate physical, electronic, and managerial procedures to s afeguard and secure the information we collect online.


Submissions

Any bulletin messages, suggestions, ideas, bulletin board postings or concepts that are submitted to F-Secure via this web site shall become, and remain the property of F-Secure. Furthermore, F-Secure is not responsible for the confidentiality of any information communicated to our web site. By communicating material to the F-Secure web site, you agree that F-Secure has the right to publish the material in products or publications for any purpose, including, but not limited to, advertising and promotional purposes. You agree not to take action against us in relation to material that you submit.


Amendments

F-Secure reserves the right to modify the pages or deny access to them at any time. Amendments to this policy will be posted at this URL and will be effective when posted. Please visit us again for updates.







Community Terms


The following legal terms (“terms”) govern your right to use and access to F-Secure blog “Safe and Savvy” (“blog”) provided by F-Secure Corporation (“F-Secure”, “we”, “our”). By using or visiting the blog you have read these terms, understand them and agree to be legally bound by them. You also agree not to use the blog against these terms and specific instructions elsewhere in the blog. If you do not agree to all of these terms, or if you are below the age of twelve (12), you are not allowed to access, visit or participate in the community


Description and Purpose

F-Secure provides this blog as a service to its users and customers, to help them exchange ideas, tips, information, and techniques related to overall security related issues and to our services. This blog is here for the enjoyment and benefit of all members and accessible to all. The community of the blog, like any community, is most valuable when everyone obeys certain basic guidelines and rules for online behavior:


Posting and Prohibited Content

Use of the blog is at your own risk. Do not post any information, especially personal information such as addresses and phone numbers, that you do not wish to make public. Any information that you post to public sections of the blog can be obtained and used by others. You are responsible for any personal information you disclose to the blog. F-Secure or WordPress.com provided by Automattic Inc. (“Platform Provider”) is not responsible for third parties’ use of information posted on the blog and to the blog community. Users of the blog agree not to upload, post, or otherwise transmit any content that includes any of the following inappropriate content:

  • Content that is: unlawful, libelous, harmful, vulgar, obscene, derogatory, pornographic, abusive, harassing, threatening, hateful, objectionable with respect to race, religion, creed, national origin or gender;
  • Any private or personal information or content that is not your own or that you do not have rights to transmit, such as: address, phone number, personal email address, social security number and copyrighted content, trade secrets or securities
  • Off-topic content not relevant to blog community purpose;
  • Spam, such as advertising, promotion or solicitation, including chain letters, class action lawsuits, charitable appeals;
  • Content or links to content that contains contaminating or destructive features that may damage someone else’s computer;
  • Duplicate or excessively repeated submissions in one or more areas;
  • Content designed to evade profanity or other filters;
  • Hyperlinks to sites that violate the terms;
  • Content used to impersonate another person;
  • Content or behavior that violates any applicable laws;
  • Content or behavior that interferes with the operation of the site or with another member’s ability to use the site;
  • Evading site controls such as bans, or otherwise disregarding the directions of the site moderators or administrators
  • Content that infringes copyrights or other intellectual property rights of third parties.


Enforcement

F-Secure may remove any information, in its sole discretion, including but not limited to personal data or data, material or content provided by any of the users, considered to violate the Terms or be inappropriate for the blog for any reason. F-Secure shall under this agreement have no obligation to monitor any of the material provided by you to F-Secure and/or to the blog community, but may do so at its discretion. F-Secure also retains the right to immediately revoke any and all of Your access rights in case Your breach of any of these Terms or suspected misuse of the blog.


To report violations, please contact the F-Secure blog team and include the blog-post/comment and the author-name in question: safeandsavvy@f-secure.com




latest posts

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How “the Cloud” Keeps you Safe

“The cloud” is a big thing nowadays. It’s not exactly a new concept, but tech companies are relying on it more and more. Many online services that people enjoy use the cloud to one extent or another, and this includes security software. Cloud computing offers unique security benefits, and F-Secure recently updated F-Secure SAFE to take better advantage of F-Secure’s Security Cloud. It combines cloud-based scanning with F-Secure’s award-winning device-based security technology, giving you a more comprehensive form of protection. Using the cloud to supplement device-based scanning provides immediate, up-to-date information about threats. Device-based scanning, which is the traditional way of identifying malware, examines files against a database saved on the device to determine whether or not a file is malicious. This is a backbone of online protection, so it’s a vital part of F-Secure SAFE. Cloud-based scanning enhances this functionality by checking files against malware information in both the local database found on devices, and a centralized database saved in the cloud. When a new threat is detected by anyone connected to the cloud, it is immediately identified and becomes "known" within the cloud. This ensures that new threats are identified quickly and everyone has immediate access to the information, eliminating the need to update the database on devices when a new threat is discovered. Plus, cloud-based scanning makes actual apps easier to run. This is particularly important on mobile devices, as heavy anti-virus solutions can drain the battery life and other resources of devices. F-Secure SAFE’s Android app has now been updated with an “Ultralight” anti-virus engine. It uses the cloud to take the workload from the devices, and is optimized to scan apps and files with a greater degree of efficiency. Relying on the cloud gives you more battery life, and keeps you safer. The latest F-Secure SAFE update also brings Network Checker to Windows PC users. Network Checker is a device-based version of F-Secure’s popular Router Checker tool. It checks the Internet configuration your computer uses to connect to the Internet. Checking your configuration, as opposed to just your device, helps protect you from attacks that target home network appliances like routers – a threat not detected by traditional anti-virus products. So the cloud is offering people much more than just extra storage space. You can click here to try F-Secure SAFE for a free 30-day trial if you’re interested in learning how F-Secure is using the cloud to help keep people safe. [Image by Perspecsys Photos | Flickr]

June 30, 2015
BY 
money, burnt, online, internet, scams

The 5 Internet scams your kid or mom is most likely to fall for

There wouldn't be billions people online every moment of every day if everyone was getting scammed all the time. Online security is, in many ways, better than ever, as are the sites designed to attract our attention. But exploits and the crooks that want to exploit us still exist, enjoying advanced malware-as-service models proven to steal our data, time and money. And with the awesome number of people online, scams only need to work a tiny percentage of the time to make the bad guys rich. We're sure you're savvy enough to avoid most trouble. But for everyone else you know, here are 5 common scams to look out for. 1. Ransomware. This scam, which F-Secure Labs has been tracking for over 5 years, prospers because it offers incredible returns -- to the scammer. "It estimated it would cost $5,900 (£3,860) to buy a ransomware kit that could return up to $90,000 in one month of operation," the BBC reports. It works like this. You suddenly get a message saying that your files are being held and you need to pay a ransom to release them. Sometimes the scam pretends to be from a police organization to make them extra scary: Anonymous cyber-currencies like bitcoin have made the scam even more appealing. "That's what really enabled the ransomware problem to explode," our Mikko Hypponen said. "Once the criminals were able to collect their ransom without getting caught, nothing was stopping them." They really do take your files and they generally will give them back. Ironically, their reputation matters since people will stop paying if they hear it won't work. Mikko recommends four ways to defend yourself from this -- and almost every scam: Always backup your important files. Ensure software is up-to-date. Be suspicious of message attachments and links in email. Always run updated comprehensive security software. He adds, "Don't pay money to these clowns unless you absolutely have to." 2. Technical support scams. "In a recent twist, scam artists are using the phone to try to break into your computer," reports the U.S. Federal Trade Commission. "They call, claiming to be computer techs associated with well-known companies like Microsoft. They say that they’ve detected viruses or other malware on your computer to trick you into giving them remote access or paying for software you don’t need." Never give anyone who calls you unsolicited your private information or access to your computer. As a matter a fact, don't do that even if the call is solicited. If you feel the call may actually important, ask who they are calling from and then contact the organization directly. For more tips visit the FTC site. 3. Facebook freebies. Free iPad! Free vacation! Free gift card! If it's free, it's on Facebook and it comes from someone you do not know or trust directly, assume it's a scam. At best it's a waste of your time, at worst it could end up costing you money. Unfortunately, there are only two things you can do to avoid these scams. Don't follow people who share crap like this on Facebook and don't click on things that seem too good to be true. "There is no way a company can afford to give every Facebook user a $25.00, $50.00 or $100.00 gift card," Facecrooks, a site that monitors these scams, reminds you. "A little common sense here tells you that something is way off base." So be suspicious of everything on Facebook. Even friends asking for money. 4. Loan scams. Scammers are smart. They know that the more a person is in financial need, the more desperate she or he becomes. For this reason, loans of various kinds -- especially mortgages that are in foreclosure -- are often lures for a scam. Once they have your attention, they may use a variety of tactics to dupe you, the FTC explains. They may demand a fee to renegotiate your loans for lower payments or to do an "audit" of what you're paying. It may even go far enough that they'll ask you directly or trick you into signing over your house to ease the pressure from your creditors. There are many warning signs to look out for. Keep in mind that if you're ever in doubt, the best step is to back off and seek advice. You can also tell the person you're going to get a second opinion on this from a lawyer. If the person you're dealing with insists that you not or freaks out in any other way, it's a good sign you're being taken. 5. Money mule scams. These scams are a variation on the 419 scams where a foreign prince asks you to hold money for him. All you have to do is wire him some first. But in this case you may actually get the money and be used as a tool of organized crime. A money mule illegally transfers money for someone in exchange for some of the take. Many law-abiding people get drawn into this crime while searching for jobs or romance, which is why your should stick to legitimate sites if you're seeking either of those things. Greed and the lure lottery winnings and inheritances is also used as a lure for potential victims. Trust is the most important thing on the internet. Anyone who trusts you too quickly with offers of money or love is probably scamming you. Cheers, Sandra [Image by epSos .de | Flickr]

June 24, 2015
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