Terms

Terms and Conditions

Please note that when accessing The F-Secure World Wide Web pages you agree to the following terms:
[sas_arrow_down][/sas_arrow_down]


Disclaimer

The contents of F-Secure World Wide Web pages are provided “as is” and “as available”. No warranty of any kind, either express or implied, is made in relation to the availability, accuracy, reliability or content of these pages. To the extent permitted by law, F-Secure shall not be liable for any direct, indirect, incidental or consequential damages arising out of the use of or inability to use these pages, even if F-Secure has been advised of the possibility of such damages.


Third Party Sites

This policy only addresses our activities from our servers. This web site contains links to web sites that are not under our control. We are not responsible for the content, commentary or applications of these web sites. We are providing these links only as a convenience and the inclusion of these links does not imply endorsement by us of the linked web site.


Copyright

The contents of F-Secure World Wide Web pages are protected by international copyright laws © F-Secure 1994 – 2006. All rights reserved. Reproduction, transfer, distribution or storage of part, or all of the contents, including but not limited to pictures, design format, logo, audio clips, video clips and HTML coding, in any form without the prior written permission of F-Secure is prohibited. Any and all reproduction, total or partial, of the texts, illustrations, design format or logo by any means whatsoever, is illegal. Such reproduction requires the prior written consent of F-Secure. We protect our intellectual property rights to the full extent of the law. F-Secure” and the triangle symbol are registered trademarks of F-Secure Corporation and F-Secure product names and symbols/logos are either trademarks or registered trademarks of F-Secure Corporation.

All other trademarks mentioned in the F-Secure World Wide Web pages are the property of their respective holders. Nokia is a registered trademark and the Nokia OK logo is a trademark of Nokia Corporation. Nokia id-codes are a00014, a00015 and a00018. Symbian and all Symbian-based marks and logos are trade marks of Symbian Limited.


Security

F-Secure is committed to ensuring the security of your information. To prevent unauthorized access or disclosure, maintain data accuracy, and ensure the appropriate use of information, we have put in place appropriate physical, electronic, and managerial procedures to s afeguard and secure the information we collect online.


Submissions

Any bulletin messages, suggestions, ideas, bulletin board postings or concepts that are submitted to F-Secure via this web site shall become, and remain the property of F-Secure. Furthermore, F-Secure is not responsible for the confidentiality of any information communicated to our web site. By communicating material to the F-Secure web site, you agree that F-Secure has the right to publish the material in products or publications for any purpose, including, but not limited to, advertising and promotional purposes. You agree not to take action against us in relation to material that you submit.


Amendments

F-Secure reserves the right to modify the pages or deny access to them at any time. Amendments to this policy will be posted at this URL and will be effective when posted. Please visit us again for updates.







Community Terms


The following legal terms (“terms”) govern your right to use and access to F-Secure blog “Safe and Savvy” (“blog”) provided by F-Secure Corporation (“F-Secure”, “we”, “our”). By using or visiting the blog you have read these terms, understand them and agree to be legally bound by them. You also agree not to use the blog against these terms and specific instructions elsewhere in the blog. If you do not agree to all of these terms, or if you are below the age of twelve (12), you are not allowed to access, visit or participate in the community


Description and Purpose

F-Secure provides this blog as a service to its users and customers, to help them exchange ideas, tips, information, and techniques related to overall security related issues and to our services. This blog is here for the enjoyment and benefit of all members and accessible to all. The community of the blog, like any community, is most valuable when everyone obeys certain basic guidelines and rules for online behavior:


Posting and Prohibited Content

Use of the blog is at your own risk. Do not post any information, especially personal information such as addresses and phone numbers, that you do not wish to make public. Any information that you post to public sections of the blog can be obtained and used by others. You are responsible for any personal information you disclose to the blog. F-Secure or WordPress.com provided by Automattic Inc. (“Platform Provider”) is not responsible for third parties’ use of information posted on the blog and to the blog community. Users of the blog agree not to upload, post, or otherwise transmit any content that includes any of the following inappropriate content:

  • Content that is: unlawful, libelous, harmful, vulgar, obscene, derogatory, pornographic, abusive, harassing, threatening, hateful, objectionable with respect to race, religion, creed, national origin or gender;
  • Any private or personal information or content that is not your own or that you do not have rights to transmit, such as: address, phone number, personal email address, social security number and copyrighted content, trade secrets or securities
  • Off-topic content not relevant to blog community purpose;
  • Spam, such as advertising, promotion or solicitation, including chain letters, class action lawsuits, charitable appeals;
  • Content or links to content that contains contaminating or destructive features that may damage someone else’s computer;
  • Duplicate or excessively repeated submissions in one or more areas;
  • Content designed to evade profanity or other filters;
  • Hyperlinks to sites that violate the terms;
  • Content used to impersonate another person;
  • Content or behavior that violates any applicable laws;
  • Content or behavior that interferes with the operation of the site or with another member’s ability to use the site;
  • Evading site controls such as bans, or otherwise disregarding the directions of the site moderators or administrators
  • Content that infringes copyrights or other intellectual property rights of third parties.


Enforcement

F-Secure may remove any information, in its sole discretion, including but not limited to personal data or data, material or content provided by any of the users, considered to violate the Terms or be inappropriate for the blog for any reason. F-Secure shall under this agreement have no obligation to monitor any of the material provided by you to F-Secure and/or to the blog community, but may do so at its discretion. F-Secure also retains the right to immediately revoke any and all of Your access rights in case Your breach of any of these Terms or suspected misuse of the blog.


To report violations, please contact the F-Secure blog team and include the blog-post/comment and the author-name in question: safeandsavvy@f-secure.com




latest posts

vulnerabilities holes software unpatched

The biggest security mistakes small businesses make

Online criminals are in the business of finding holes -- holes in your software. "Pieces of software will always have vulnerabilities, and there will always be criminals creating exploits for those vulnerabilities," says F-Secure Senior Researcher Timo Hirvonen. "It's become a whole business model for these criminals, because the security patches that companies release basically expose the vulnerabilities in software. The criminals reverse engineer the patches to find vulnerabilities, and then they target those vulnerabilities with exploits they develop." Given that they spend all day thinking about how to get into your network and you spend all all day trying to run your business, they may have the advantage. But there is a lot you can do to make your data and customers safer. Our Security Advisor Sean Sullivan recently responded to questions we frequently hear from businesses trying to secure their IT infrastructure. He explained with what the most common vulnerabilities tend to be, the steps you can take to patch them and the biggest mistakes businesses make. Mobile apps and cloud systems allow employees to access documents, systems, data and other work product from anywhere, but always-on access comes with always-threatening security risks. What are the most significant of those risks? Always on and working from anywhere means more devices and a larger attack surface area. Even a diligent and tech-savvy person who is cautious about not opening a suspicious file can still be a victim of exploits, as these kits automatically take advantage of vulnerabilities in software that are commonly used by browsers and programs, such as Adobe Reader, Flash players, etc. More than half of what F-Secure is blocking these days are exploits, and they’re among the biggest threats to SMBs because people frequently don't update their software and this puts the business at greater risk. A Java plug-in update, for example, that people often ignore thinking it’s not a mission-critical application for their day-to-day activities can be the chink in the armor that lets in a malicious attack. Some of the exploit kits we're detecting are using exploits that have been detected and patched MONTHS ago, but the attackers are betting that many businesses haven’t updated their software, and their bets are paying off. What are the most important steps small and medium-sized businesses should take to protect themselves against those risks? The cybersecurity landscape is fluid so invest in sending your IT person to training seminars so he or she can learn more about protecting your users and network. Additionally, selecting a cloud-based security solution helps you and your employees not have to worry about updating plugins and applications. What are some of the biggest mistakes SMBs make in this area? They undervalue their data and content. Training documents for new hires, for example, aren’t mission critical to the business functioning, so it’s likely the business wouldn’t see it as valuable, but if they had to recreate all of those files from scratch, it would likely take a lot of time and resources, right? Thinking an attacker won’t go after certain items because it’s not important to them is the wrong mindset — they care about what’s important to you. Backup files in multiple locations — online and physical hard drives. Use a VPN to encrypt your communication and encourage or provide VPN applications for your employees to use on their work and personal devices. Lastly, keep your systems updated. Using a cloud-based security software that takes care of all that helps saves you time and money and lets you focus on your business and the professionals handle security. Our F-Secure Booster's premium version contains a software update feature that can you monitor their drivers and applications to keep them patched in protected. Our business products also feature Software Updater to keep software updated and safe from exploits. [Image by elineart | Flickr]

May 28, 2015
Welcome Mat Key Security

6 ways to let criminals into your business

If you're in business, you have enemies -- and they're trying to get into your network. For-profit malware authors after baking information or files for extortion want in. Script-kiddies want in because mayhem is their game. And if you're large enough, criminals seeking data about your customers  for espionage want in too. "For instance, if you're a law firm," F-Secure Labs Senior Researcher Jarno Niemelä said in a recent webinar, "your clients might be interesting." And it's not just the clients of lawyers, who may be "interesting". He noted companies that specialize in car rental, car leasing, cleaning and catering all have customers that are attractive targets for your enemies. In order for an attack to be successful, the attacker must first get information about his or her targets. And the worst part is we may be letting our enemies in. Here are the 5 most common methods that is done: 1. Email. Spam is designed to hit anyone and only needs to work a tiny fraction of the time. A spear phishing attack was designed to get you. 2. Hacked websites. Like a lion hiding in a savannah, the best attackers infect a website you're likely to visit -- naughty and not naughty -- and wait for you to become their prey. 3. Search Engine Poisoning. Criminals target a specific search term and tries to drive an infected site up the Google rankings. 4. Traffic Injection. These more advanced attacks hijack your traffic and send it to a router controlled by the enemy. Once you've become the victim of a man-in-the-middle attack any web site you visit could be infected just for you. 5. Social engineering. What your enemy lacks in technical savvy, s/he could make up with the ability to fool you. 6. Affiliate marketing. Some criminals -- and intelligence agencies -- simply buy their victims in bulk. Jarno calls it "the digital slave trade". Of course, these aren't the only ways into your network. Jarno also explained how offline attacks through external drives, for instance, can provide access. But these are the six most likely ways your enemies will find their way in your network. And you should have some idea what they're up to, since their success depends on your mistakes. Cheers, Sandra    

May 19, 2015
Mikko Hypponen What Twitter knows

Your favorite breakfast cereal and other things Twitter knows about you

At Re:publica 2015, our Chief Research Officer Mikko Hypponen told the main stage crowd that the world's top scientists are now focused on the delivery of ads. "I think this is sad," he said. [youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pbF0sVdOjRw?rel=0&start=762&end=&autoplay=0] To give the audience a sense of how much Twitter knows about its users, he showed them the remarkable targeting the microblogging service offers its advertisers. If you use the site, you may be served promoted tweets based on the following: 1. What breakfast cereal you eat. 2. The alcohol you drink. 3. Your income. 4. If you suffer from allergies. 5. If you're expecting a child. And that's just the beginning. You can be targeted based not only on your recent device purchases but things you may be in the market for like, say, a new house or a new car. You can see all the targeting offered by logging into your Twitter, going to the top right corner of the interface, clicking on your icon and selecting "Twitter Ads". Can Twitter learn all this just based on your tweets and which accounts follow? No, Mikko said. "They buy this information from real world shops, from credit card companies, and from frequent buyer clubs." Twitter then connects this information to you based on... your phone number. And you've agreed to have this happen to you because you read and memorized the nearly 7,000 words in its Terms and Conditions. Because everyone reads the terms and conditions. Full disclosure: We do occasionally promote tweets on Twitter to promote or digital freedom message and tools like Freedome that block ad trackers. It's an effective tool and we find the irony rich. Part of our mission is to make it clear that there's no such thing as "free" on the internet. If you aren't paying a price, you are the product. Aral Balkan compares social networks to a creepy uncle" that pays the bills by listening to as many of your conversations as they can then selling what they've heard to its actual customers. And with the world's top minds dedicated to monetizing your attention, we just think you should be as aware of advertisers as they are as of you. Most of the top URLs in the world are actually trackers that you never access directly. To get a sense of what advertisers learn every time you click check out our new Privacy Checker. Cheers, Jason

May 15, 2015
BY 
F-Secure
community.f-secure.com F-Secure Facebook F-Secure Youtube F-Secure Twitter F-Secure google+
Copyright 2014 by F-Secure
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 460 other followers