Terms

Terms and Conditions

Please note that when accessing The F-Secure World Wide Web pages you agree to the following terms:
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Disclaimer

The contents of F-Secure World Wide Web pages are provided “as is” and “as available”. No warranty of any kind, either express or implied, is made in relation to the availability, accuracy, reliability or content of these pages. To the extent permitted by law, F-Secure shall not be liable for any direct, indirect, incidental or consequential damages arising out of the use of or inability to use these pages, even if F-Secure has been advised of the possibility of such damages.


Third Party Sites

This policy only addresses our activities from our servers. This web site contains links to web sites that are not under our control. We are not responsible for the content, commentary or applications of these web sites. We are providing these links only as a convenience and the inclusion of these links does not imply endorsement by us of the linked web site.


Copyright

The contents of F-Secure World Wide Web pages are protected by international copyright laws © F-Secure 1994 – 2006. All rights reserved. Reproduction, transfer, distribution or storage of part, or all of the contents, including but not limited to pictures, design format, logo, audio clips, video clips and HTML coding, in any form without the prior written permission of F-Secure is prohibited. Any and all reproduction, total or partial, of the texts, illustrations, design format or logo by any means whatsoever, is illegal. Such reproduction requires the prior written consent of F-Secure. We protect our intellectual property rights to the full extent of the law. F-Secure” and the triangle symbol are registered trademarks of F-Secure Corporation and F-Secure product names and symbols/logos are either trademarks or registered trademarks of F-Secure Corporation.

All other trademarks mentioned in the F-Secure World Wide Web pages are the property of their respective holders. Nokia is a registered trademark and the Nokia OK logo is a trademark of Nokia Corporation. Nokia id-codes are a00014, a00015 and a00018. Symbian and all Symbian-based marks and logos are trade marks of Symbian Limited.


Security

F-Secure is committed to ensuring the security of your information. To prevent unauthorized access or disclosure, maintain data accuracy, and ensure the appropriate use of information, we have put in place appropriate physical, electronic, and managerial procedures to s afeguard and secure the information we collect online.


Submissions

Any bulletin messages, suggestions, ideas, bulletin board postings or concepts that are submitted to F-Secure via this web site shall become, and remain the property of F-Secure. Furthermore, F-Secure is not responsible for the confidentiality of any information communicated to our web site. By communicating material to the F-Secure web site, you agree that F-Secure has the right to publish the material in products or publications for any purpose, including, but not limited to, advertising and promotional purposes. You agree not to take action against us in relation to material that you submit.


Amendments

F-Secure reserves the right to modify the pages or deny access to them at any time. Amendments to this policy will be posted at this URL and will be effective when posted. Please visit us again for updates.







Community Terms


The following legal terms (“terms”) govern your right to use and access to F-Secure blog “Safe and Savvy” (“blog”) provided by F-Secure Corporation (“F-Secure”, “we”, “our”). By using or visiting the blog you have read these terms, understand them and agree to be legally bound by them. You also agree not to use the blog against these terms and specific instructions elsewhere in the blog. If you do not agree to all of these terms, or if you are below the age of twelve (12), you are not allowed to access, visit or participate in the community


Description and Purpose

F-Secure provides this blog as a service to its users and customers, to help them exchange ideas, tips, information, and techniques related to overall security related issues and to our services. This blog is here for the enjoyment and benefit of all members and accessible to all. The community of the blog, like any community, is most valuable when everyone obeys certain basic guidelines and rules for online behavior:


Posting and Prohibited Content

Use of the blog is at your own risk. Do not post any information, especially personal information such as addresses and phone numbers, that you do not wish to make public. Any information that you post to public sections of the blog can be obtained and used by others. You are responsible for any personal information you disclose to the blog. F-Secure or WordPress.com provided by Automattic Inc. (“Platform Provider”) is not responsible for third parties’ use of information posted on the blog and to the blog community. Users of the blog agree not to upload, post, or otherwise transmit any content that includes any of the following inappropriate content:

  • Content that is: unlawful, libelous, harmful, vulgar, obscene, derogatory, pornographic, abusive, harassing, threatening, hateful, objectionable with respect to race, religion, creed, national origin or gender;
  • Any private or personal information or content that is not your own or that you do not have rights to transmit, such as: address, phone number, personal email address, social security number and copyrighted content, trade secrets or securities
  • Off-topic content not relevant to blog community purpose;
  • Spam, such as advertising, promotion or solicitation, including chain letters, class action lawsuits, charitable appeals;
  • Content or links to content that contains contaminating or destructive features that may damage someone else’s computer;
  • Duplicate or excessively repeated submissions in one or more areas;
  • Content designed to evade profanity or other filters;
  • Hyperlinks to sites that violate the terms;
  • Content used to impersonate another person;
  • Content or behavior that violates any applicable laws;
  • Content or behavior that interferes with the operation of the site or with another member’s ability to use the site;
  • Evading site controls such as bans, or otherwise disregarding the directions of the site moderators or administrators
  • Content that infringes copyrights or other intellectual property rights of third parties.


Enforcement

F-Secure may remove any information, in its sole discretion, including but not limited to personal data or data, material or content provided by any of the users, considered to violate the Terms or be inappropriate for the blog for any reason. F-Secure shall under this agreement have no obligation to monitor any of the material provided by you to F-Secure and/or to the blog community, but may do so at its discretion. F-Secure also retains the right to immediately revoke any and all of Your access rights in case Your breach of any of these Terms or suspected misuse of the blog.


To report violations, please contact the F-Secure blog team and include the blog-post/comment and the author-name in question: safeandsavvy@f-secure.com




latest posts

twitter, changes

POLL: What Changes To Twitter Would You Like To See?

Little changes can make a difference. For instance, Twitter's decision to switch a star for a heart as its "Favorite" button increased use of the button by as much as 27.82 percent. And it's clear that despite Wall St. demanding that site grow faster and be easier for new users to grasp to have some hope of keeping up with competitors like Facebook and Snapchat, the site is still sweating the small stuff. Here are the four changes to the service announced this week: Replies: When replying to a Tweet, @names will no longer count toward the 140-character count. This will make having conversations on Twitter easier and more straightforward, no more penny-pinching your words to ensure they reach the whole group. Media attachments: When you add attachments like photos, GIFs, videos, polls, or Quote Tweets, that media will no longer count as characters within your Tweet. More room for words! Retweet and Quote Tweet yourself: We’ll be enabling the Retweet button on your own Tweets, so you can easily Retweet or Quote Tweet yourself when you want to share a new reflection or feel like a really good one went unnoticed. Goodbye, .@: These changes will help simplify the rules around Tweets that start with a username. New Tweets that begin with a username will reach all your followers. (That means you’ll no longer have to use the ”.@” convention, which people currently use to broadcast Tweets broadly.) If you want a reply to be seen by all your followers, you will be able to Retweet it to signal that you intend for it to be viewed more broadly. These tweaks are in line with Twitter's tradition of paying attention to how people use the site and make it easier for them to do what early adopters are already doing. That's how we got hashtags, retweet buttons and @ replies. Now you'll be able to tweet a bit longer messages, something people do now with screenshots of text, and have more public conversations, something people do now by putting a "." before someone's @username so their whole feed sees the conversation not just people who happen to follow you and the user you're conversing with. Cool. These are useful little nudges that will keep people who already love the site engaged -- even though they may have some ugly unforeseen consequences. But will they transform Twitter and spark a new wave of growth? Not likely. What would without alienating the hundreds of millions of loyal users? Tough question and we'd like to know what you think. [polldaddy poll=9429603] Cheers, Jason [Image by dominiccampbell | Flickr]

May 26, 2016
BY 
brain floppy, scanning engines, malware scanning

5 Ways We Stop Cyber Attacks In Their Tracks

See that floppy disc? That's how F-Secure Labs used to get malware to analyze. Nowadays, of course, it's much different, Andy Patel from the Labs explained in a recent post, "What's The Deal with Scanning Engines?" In just a few hundred words, Andy lays out what makes modern protection so different from the anti-virus that you remember from the 80s, 90s or even the early 00s. And it's not just that floppy disks the Labs once analyzed have been replaced by almost any sort of digital input, down to a piece of memory or a network stream. The whole post is worth checking out if you're interested in how relentless modern internet security must be to keep up with the panoply of online threats we face. But here's a quick look at five of the key components of endpoint protection that work in tandem to stop attacks in their tracks, as described by Andy: Scanning engines. Today’s detections are really just complex computer programs, designed to perform intricate sample analysis directly on the client. Modern detections are designed to catch thousands, or even hundreds of thousands of samples. URL blocking. Preventing a user from being exposed to a site hosting an exploit kit or other malicious content negates the need for any further protection measures. We do this largely via URL and IP reputation cloud queries. Spam blocking and email filtering also happen here. Exploit detection. If a user does manage to visit a site hosting an exploit kit, and that user is running vulnerable software, any attempt to exploit that vulnerable software will be blocked by our behavioral monitoring engine. Network and on-access scanning. If a user receives a malicious file via email or download, it will be scanned on the network or when it is written to disk. If the file is found to be malicious, it will be removed from the user’s system. Behavioral blocking. Assuming no file-based detection existed for the object, the user may then go on to open or execute the document, script, or program. At this point, malicious behavior will be blocked by our behavioral engine and again, the file will be removed. The fact is, a majority of malware delivery mechanisms are easily blocked behaviorally. In most cases, when we find new threats, we also discover that we had, in the distant past, already added logic addressing the mechanisms it uses.If you're interested in knowing more about behavioral engines, check out this post in which Andy makes then easy to understand by comparing the technology to securing an office building. So you must be wondering, does this all work? Is it enough? Well, our experts and our computers are always learning. But in all the tests this year run by independent analysts AV-Comparatives, we’ve blocked 100% of the real-world threats thrown at us. Cheers, Jason  

May 24, 2016
BY 
online_anonymity

Anonymity is not Just for Criminals – 3 legit Reasons to Hide your Tracks Online

  In 1853 a strange new invention appeared in the English cityscape, and caused a small wave of moral outrage among Victorians. This perceived threat to social order was not a new drug, political movement or saucy romance novel, but the seemingly harmless letter box. One reason was the shocking development of women now being able to post letters without consent from their husbands or fathers, and the other one was that sending anonymous letters would now be even easier. Maybe Victorians weren’t very thick-skinned, and were worried about unsigned letters calling people zounderkites and rantallions skyrocketing. Who knows?   History now tells us that these attempts to control this early form of long-distance communication were ridiculous. And yet, a modern version of this debate is happening even today: there are those who want to make encrypted, anonymous communication available for everyone, and those who wish to restrict it. No new technology comes without drawbacks, and encryption is no exception. However, just as with the Victorian letter box, the pros greatly outweigh the cons.   But why do people want to be anonymous online? Those who oppose encryption and other methods which advance online anonymity often throw around the tired argument “If you don’t have anything to hide, you have no need to be anonymous”. Not only does this statement show an astounding lack of perspective, it is also blatantly false. According to CBS there is a rising increase in desire for online anonymity, and there are many perfectly valid and legitimate reason to cover your tracks online. A lot of us just don’t feel comfortable with their Internet Service Provider, employer or even government having access to their surfing information. We all have a right to privacy, but technology is increasing the size of our digital footprint to the point when we can never know who is monitoring what we do online. Legislation, like the aptly nicknamed Snoopers Charter have the potential to give governments and ISP’s blanket rights to monitor web traffic of normal users in the name of security. This means the responsibility to protect our individual privacy rests increasingly in our own hands, and VPN services like our own Freedome go a long way in making that happen.   For many people, it’s about control. We share aspects of our lives and personality on social media and other websites, but the choice of what we share should be ours to make. This control is taken away by advertisers and tracking companies, who collect information about us from different websites and piece them together to form elaborate dossiers which contain way more information about us than most would be comfortable sharing, like your medical information or what kind of porn you watch. For many, part of being anonymous online is blocking this kind of intrusive tracking, and it’s hard to find fault in that.   The most serious group of people wanting anonymity are those for whom it is not so much a matter of principle but a matter of life and death. We are talking about activists, journalists and opposition supporters who operate under oppressive regimes or in places where criminals seek out and silence those who speak against them. It’s easy for those who support intrusive privacy legislation to forget that the governments who enact them will invariably have ulterior motives to “catching terrorists” or “protecting national security”: they give governments the power to control what we say.  Open and free communication is the greatest tool the masses have to keep those in power accountable for their actions, and there is nothing open or free about the kind of mass surveillance which is happening more and more, legally and otherwise.   What are your reasons to be anonymous online? This is not a black & white subject, and we’d be glad to hear your thoughts via the Freedome twitter channel @FreedomeVPN.

May 21, 2016
BY 
F-Secure
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