Terms

Terms and Conditions

Please note that when accessing The F-Secure World Wide Web pages you agree to the following terms:
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Disclaimer

The contents of F-Secure World Wide Web pages are provided “as is” and “as available”. No warranty of any kind, either express or implied, is made in relation to the availability, accuracy, reliability or content of these pages. To the extent permitted by law, F-Secure shall not be liable for any direct, indirect, incidental or consequential damages arising out of the use of or inability to use these pages, even if F-Secure has been advised of the possibility of such damages.


Third Party Sites

This policy only addresses our activities from our servers. This web site contains links to web sites that are not under our control. We are not responsible for the content, commentary or applications of these web sites. We are providing these links only as a convenience and the inclusion of these links does not imply endorsement by us of the linked web site.


Copyright

The contents of F-Secure World Wide Web pages are protected by international copyright laws © F-Secure 1994 – 2006. All rights reserved. Reproduction, transfer, distribution or storage of part, or all of the contents, including but not limited to pictures, design format, logo, audio clips, video clips and HTML coding, in any form without the prior written permission of F-Secure is prohibited. Any and all reproduction, total or partial, of the texts, illustrations, design format or logo by any means whatsoever, is illegal. Such reproduction requires the prior written consent of F-Secure. We protect our intellectual property rights to the full extent of the law. F-Secure” and the triangle symbol are registered trademarks of F-Secure Corporation and F-Secure product names and symbols/logos are either trademarks or registered trademarks of F-Secure Corporation.

All other trademarks mentioned in the F-Secure World Wide Web pages are the property of their respective holders. Nokia is a registered trademark and the Nokia OK logo is a trademark of Nokia Corporation. Nokia id-codes are a00014, a00015 and a00018. Symbian and all Symbian-based marks and logos are trade marks of Symbian Limited.


Security

F-Secure is committed to ensuring the security of your information. To prevent unauthorized access or disclosure, maintain data accuracy, and ensure the appropriate use of information, we have put in place appropriate physical, electronic, and managerial procedures to s afeguard and secure the information we collect online.


Submissions

Any bulletin messages, suggestions, ideas, bulletin board postings or concepts that are submitted to F-Secure via this web site shall become, and remain the property of F-Secure. Furthermore, F-Secure is not responsible for the confidentiality of any information communicated to our web site. By communicating material to the F-Secure web site, you agree that F-Secure has the right to publish the material in products or publications for any purpose, including, but not limited to, advertising and promotional purposes. You agree not to take action against us in relation to material that you submit.


Amendments

F-Secure reserves the right to modify the pages or deny access to them at any time. Amendments to this policy will be posted at this URL and will be effective when posted. Please visit us again for updates.







Community Terms


The following legal terms (“terms”) govern your right to use and access to F-Secure blog “Safe and Savvy” (“blog”) provided by F-Secure Corporation (“F-Secure”, “we”, “our”). By using or visiting the blog you have read these terms, understand them and agree to be legally bound by them. You also agree not to use the blog against these terms and specific instructions elsewhere in the blog. If you do not agree to all of these terms, or if you are below the age of twelve (12), you are not allowed to access, visit or participate in the community


Description and Purpose

F-Secure provides this blog as a service to its users and customers, to help them exchange ideas, tips, information, and techniques related to overall security related issues and to our services. This blog is here for the enjoyment and benefit of all members and accessible to all. The community of the blog, like any community, is most valuable when everyone obeys certain basic guidelines and rules for online behavior:


Posting and Prohibited Content

Use of the blog is at your own risk. Do not post any information, especially personal information such as addresses and phone numbers, that you do not wish to make public. Any information that you post to public sections of the blog can be obtained and used by others. You are responsible for any personal information you disclose to the blog. F-Secure or WordPress.com provided by Automattic Inc. (“Platform Provider”) is not responsible for third parties’ use of information posted on the blog and to the blog community. Users of the blog agree not to upload, post, or otherwise transmit any content that includes any of the following inappropriate content:

  • Content that is: unlawful, libelous, harmful, vulgar, obscene, derogatory, pornographic, abusive, harassing, threatening, hateful, objectionable with respect to race, religion, creed, national origin or gender;
  • Any private or personal information or content that is not your own or that you do not have rights to transmit, such as: address, phone number, personal email address, social security number and copyrighted content, trade secrets or securities
  • Off-topic content not relevant to blog community purpose;
  • Spam, such as advertising, promotion or solicitation, including chain letters, class action lawsuits, charitable appeals;
  • Content or links to content that contains contaminating or destructive features that may damage someone else’s computer;
  • Duplicate or excessively repeated submissions in one or more areas;
  • Content designed to evade profanity or other filters;
  • Hyperlinks to sites that violate the terms;
  • Content used to impersonate another person;
  • Content or behavior that violates any applicable laws;
  • Content or behavior that interferes with the operation of the site or with another member’s ability to use the site;
  • Evading site controls such as bans, or otherwise disregarding the directions of the site moderators or administrators
  • Content that infringes copyrights or other intellectual property rights of third parties.


Enforcement

F-Secure may remove any information, in its sole discretion, including but not limited to personal data or data, material or content provided by any of the users, considered to violate the Terms or be inappropriate for the blog for any reason. F-Secure shall under this agreement have no obligation to monitor any of the material provided by you to F-Secure and/or to the blog community, but may do so at its discretion. F-Secure also retains the right to immediately revoke any and all of Your access rights in case Your breach of any of these Terms or suspected misuse of the blog.


To report violations, please contact the F-Secure blog team and include the blog-post/comment and the author-name in question: safeandsavvy@f-secure.com




latest posts

BYOD

Why Bring your own Device (BYOD)?

Do you ever use your personal phone to make work related calls? Or send work related e-mails? Maybe you even use it to work on Google Docs, or access company files remotely? Doing these things basically means you’re implementing a BYOD policy at your work, whether they know it or not. BYOD – that’s bring your own device – isn’t really a new trend, but it is one that’s becoming more widespread. Statistics from TrackVia suggest that younger generations are embracing BYOD on a massive scale, with nearly 70% of surveyed Millennials admitting that they use their own devices and software, regardless of their employer’s policies on the matter. This is essentially pressuring employers to accept the trend, as the alternative could mean imposing security restrictions that limit how people go about their work. Consequently, Gartner predicts that 38% of businesses will stop providing employees with devices by 2016. It kind of seems like workers are enforcing the trend, and not businesses. But it’s happening because it’s so much easier to work with phones, tablets, and computers that you understand and enjoy. Work becomes easier, productivity goes up, life becomes more satisfying, etc. This might sound like an exaggeration, and maybe it is a little bit. BYOD won’t solve all of life’s problems, but it really takes advantage of the flexibility modern technology offers. And that’s what mobility should be about, and that’s what businesses are missing out on when they anchor people to a specific device. BYOD promotes a more “organic” aspect of technology in that it’s something people have already invested in and want to use, not something that’s being forced upon them. But of course, there are complications. Recent research confirms that many of these same devices have already had security issues. It’s great to enjoy the benefits of using your own phone or tablet for sending company e-mails, but what happens when things go wrong? You might be turning heads at work by getting work done faster and more efficient, but don’t expect this to continue if you happen to download some malicious software that infiltrates your company’s networks. You’re not alone if you want to use your own phone, tablet, or computer for work. And you’re not even alone if you do this without telling your boss. But there’s really no reason not to try and protect yourself first. You can use security software to reduce the risk of data breaches or malicious infections harming your employer. And there’s even a business oriented version of F-Secure's popular Freedome VPN called Freedome for Business that can actually give you additional forms of protection, and can help your company manage an entire fleet of BYOD and company-owned devices. It’s worth bringing these concerns to an employer if you find yourself using your own devices at the office. After all, statistics prove that you’re not alone in your concerns, and your employer will most likely have to address the issue sooner rather than later if they want the company to use technology wisely.  

Apr 17, 2015
BY 
sign license

POLL – How should we deal with harmful license terms?

We blogged last week, once again, about the fact that people fail to read the license terms they approve when installing software. That post was inspired by a Chrome extension that monetized by collecting and selling data about users’ surfing behavior. People found out about this, got mad and called it spyware. Even if the data collection was documented in the privacy policy, and they technically had approved it. But this case is not really the point, it’s just an example of a very common business model on the Internet. The real point is what we should think about this business model. We have been used to free software and services on the net, and there are two major reasons for that. Initially the net was a playground for nerds and almost all services and programs were developed on a hobby or academic basis. The nerds were happy to give them away and all others were happy to get them for free. But businesses run into a problem when they tried to enter the net. There was no reliable payment method. This created the need for compensation models without money. The net of today is to a significant part powered by these moneyless business models. Products using them are often called free, which is incorrect as there usually is some kind of compensation involved. Nowadays we have money-based payment models too, but both our desire to get stuff for free and the moneyless models are still going strong. So what do these moneyless models really mean? Exposing the user to advertising is the best known example. This is a pretty open and honest model. Advertising can’t be hidden as the whole point is to make you see it. But it gets complicated when we start talking targeted advertising. Then someone need to know who you are and what you like, to be able to show you relevant ads. This is where it becomes a privacy issue. Ordinary users have no way to verify what data is collected about them and how it is used. Heck, often they don’t even know under what legislation it is stored and if the vendor respects privacy laws at all. Is this legal? Basically yes. Anyone is free to make agreements that involve submitting private data. But these scenarios can still be problematic in several ways. They may be in conflict with national consumer protection and privacy laws, but the most common complaint is that they aren’t fair. It’s practically impossible for ordinary users to read and understand many pages of legalese for every installed app. And some vendors utilize this by hiding the shady parts of the agreement deep into the mumbo jumbo. This creates a situation where the agreement may give significant rights to the vendor, which the users is totally unaware of. App permissions is nice development that attempts to tackle this problem. Modern operating systems for mobile devices require that apps are granted access to the resources they need. This enables the system to know more about what the app is up to and inform the user. But these rights are just becoming a slightly more advanced version of the license terms. People accept them without thinking about what they mean. This may be legal, but is it right? Personally I think the situation isn’t sustainable and something need to be done. But what? There are several ways to see this problem. What do you think is the best option?   [polldaddy poll=8801974]   The good news is however that you can avoid this problem. You can select to steer clear of “free” offerings and prefer software and services you pay money for. Their business model is simple and transparent, you get stuff and the vendor get money. These vendors do not need to hide scary clauses deep in the agreement document and can instead publish privacy principles like this.   Safe surfing, Micke     Photo by Orin Zebest at Flickr

Apr 15, 2015
BY 
Spring Clean your Devices

How to Spring Clean your Devices for Free

Spring cleaning is a popular pastime in many parts of Europe and North America. The cold weather is (hopefully) gone, and many people have already started the dusting, mopping, and sweeping that a good clean entails. Getting rid of clutter, old junk, and other types of waste never hurts. It avoids damage due to build up and lets you see that everything in your home has a proper place. Smart phones and computers need similar tender loving care, and I don’t mean just wiping down the dust. Computers and phones accumulate considerable amounts of wear and tear damage when you use them. Not just the mechanical parts either. Software performance degrades over time, and can cause computers to break down, or even result in security issues. Spring cleaning your phone doesn’t have to take a lot of time, or a lot of money. You can do it for free and can probably get through it in less than 10 minutes. Here’s a quick review of three things you can do to keep your phone running safe and sound. Check your Internet set-up: Many people don’t know this, but your router can be hacked. Things like weak passwords and outdated software allow hackers to break into your router and change the settings, essentially letting them manipulate what you see and do online. F-Secure recently launched a new tool called Router Checker that can help you check to make sure you’re connecting to the Internet safely. Router Checker launched less than a month ago, but has already received positive attention from websites like Tom's Hardware and Geek.com. It’s fast, free, and simple to use, so it’s worth taking a second to check the Internet set-up on your phone (or PC) to make sure it's working the way you want. Get rid of waste: Waste builds up in computers and phones, and over time this causes their performance to deteriorate. Spending a few minutes to clean out this waste and tighten the digital nuts and bolts on your software can pay off with longer lasting batteries, faster browsing and apps, and more storage space. F-Secure Booster is a free Android app that makes cleaning out your phone easy. Lots of the maintenance that phones and computers need is time consuming and difficult. F-Secure Booster centralizes different maintenance tasks into a user-friendly app. You can use it to shut down unnecessary processes that eat up your battery and memory, clean out temporary files and other data that wastes storage space, and even delete digital traces stored by your browser and other apps. It’s a quick way to make sure your phone runs quickly and securely. The PC version has a freemium offering that can clean our your computer, but also a premium variant with even more features, like a software updating tool. Secure your apps: According to F-Secure Labs, Android is a favorite target for mobile malware writers. That means people using Google’s platform need to be extra cautious about the apps they use. Fortunately, there’s a free app that can help protect your mobile phone from malware. Freedome is a popular, one-button VPN that offers users a number of different forms of protection, including App Security. App Security for Android basically checks the apps on your phone or mobile device to see if there’s anything dangerous about it. Freedome is available for a free 14-day trial for Android users. You need to buy a subscription if you want to keep using Freedome after your trial ends, but App Security will continue to function, even if you don’t subscribe. It’s a great way to keep an eye on your apps, and Freedome also offers mobile phone users communication encryption, web browsing protection, and even a selection of virtual locations that they can use to access region locked content. It’s a great way to make sure your phone stays protected after your spring clean!  [ Image by uncoolbob | Flickr ]

Apr 10, 2015
BY 
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