How to create and remember strong passwords

Marja threw me a challenge in her Spam from Xavier comments to write about creating strong passwords. The idea comes from our Lab Blog, where Sean posted about this a while ago.

I am one those people that have a very short attention span for technical instructions, so let me try to explain this as shortly and clearly as possible. Just in case you are like me.🙂 The idea is to use a system that allows you to do 2 things:

1. Remember your passwords through writing a part of it down. The only thing you need to remember is a part that is the same for all your passwords; a pin if you will.

2. Create passwords that are good and strong, unique and can’t be guessed

Here are the step-by-step instructions:

1. Think of a “pin” for your password, this is the part that is same for all of your passwords. The pin should be 3 characters or longer,  it could be something like “25!” and this part should be kept secret.

2. For each of the web sites that you need a password for, you create a code that helps you remember what site/service the password is for. For example aMa for Amazon and gMa for gmail.

3. Continue the password with a random set of 4 or more characters,  for example: 2299 or xy76. You should use different random characters for your different passwords.

4. Write down parts 1 & 2 on a note and keep is safe so you don’t forget it. In this example you would end up with a note in your wallet with this written down:

  • aMa2299
  • gMaxy76

5. When using the passwords, add your pin to them. Remember again that the pin should not be written down anywhere!  You can decide the location of your pin too. With the example pin “25!” created in the first step we would  end up with 2 passwords that could be:

  • aMa229925! or 25!aMa2299
  • gMaxy7625! or 25!gMaxy76

Tadaa, you now have passwords that are unique and can’t be guessed! And of course you only need to remember a part of it! By having unique passwords you can also make sure that even if someone finds out one of your passwords, the others are still safe.

As a final note, should you choose to use this system, you should come up with your own passwords and not use the ones used in this post or in our Lab’s post.

Hopefully I managed to make it sound relatively easy. If not drop me a question below.


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