What kind of planet we want to leave to our children?

Did you know that it takes 140 liters of water to produce a cup of coffee, 170 liters of water to produce a glass of orange juice, 70 liters of water for an apple. All that water just for  one breakfast.

Are we letting our ecological footprint grow out of control? What kind of planet we want leave to the next generations?

A warming planet alters weather patterns, water accessibility and food suplies. It also threatens a sustainable way of life for us and the world’s wildlife. At F-Secure, we believe it’s our responsibility to leave our children and their children an environment where they can thrive.

Earth Hour is a global call to action for individuals, businesses and governments around the world to unite against the climate change.

F-Secure will participate in this weekend’s Earth Hour movement. All of the lights in our Helsinki headquarters will be turned off between 20.30 and 21.30 local time on Saturday evening. It’s a small step but an important reminder that we can all do our part individually and together.

We invite you to join Earth Hour to help protect the irreplaceable earth we all share.

This earth will grow cold,
a star among stars
and one of the smallest,
a gilded mote on blue velvet

I mean this, our great earth.

This earth will grow cold one day,
not like a block of ice
or a dead cloud even
but like an empty walnut it will roll along
in pitch-black space …

You must grieve for this right now
–you have to feel this sorrow now–

for the world must be loved this much
if you’re going to say “I lived” …

-Nazim Hikmet



CC image by  Mișu Trașcă

More posts from this topic

Facebook Phone Number

Why Does Facebook Want My Phone Number?

Facebook has become the most popular social network in the history of known universe for a pretty simple reason: It appeals to our egos. Our egos love to be connected, recognized and comforted. But those needs are generally tiny compared to our desire to be flattered. And one way Facebook continually flatters us is by asking for our phone number -- continually. Like all the time. But like any stranger seeking your digits, the site may have ulterior motives. Ask Facebook, "Why am I being asked to add my phone number to my account?" and its help page will tell you this: Adding your phone number to your account will help keep your account secure, make it easier for you to connect with friends and family on Facebook and make it easier to regain access to your account if you have trouble logging in. That's true. But are there other reason that it might want this piece of information -- reasons that appeal directly to Facebook's bottom line? Almost certainly. In fact, the business case for getting your phone number may be so strong that it's likely at least part of the reason for the change in terms and conditions for WhatsApp, which is owned by the technology giant. So what does Facebook get when it gets your phone number? Potentially lots and lots of information about you -- possibly even your favorite breakfast cereal. Watch our chief research office Mikko Hypponen break down what the data scientists that help social networks sell ads learn about you from your number. [youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pbF0sVdOjRw?rel=0&start=762&end=&autoplay=0] Even if you don't mind being marketed at with ruthless efficiency, there may be other ways Facebook could use your number that you might want to consider. You might have heard about the therapist who began seeing her patients pop in Facebook's "People You May Know" module. How did this happen? Fusion's Kashmir Hill suggests that "an algorithm analyzing this network of phone contacts might reasonably assume all these people are connected." And in this case the therapist didn't even remember giving her number to the site, but she had. If you're logged in, you can check if Facebook has your number here. This still could be some value to you in handing over your number. Two-factor authentication is generally a smart strategy for any account you want to protect -- and you need to offer your smartphone number to access the SMS messages you'll need to use. But remember: If you make your number available on Facebook, people can find you by searching it. So if you do use Facebook's two-factor authentication, you should consider hiding your phone number for anyone but yourself. To do this, go to your profile page, click "About" under your cover image and then in the left column click on "Contact and Basic Info". Next to your mobile number, click "Edit" and select "Only Me". This will make sure strangers won't find your number through your profile or vice versa. But it won't stop Facebook from knowing what your favorite breakfast cereal is. {Image by HighwaysEngland | Flickr]

September 9, 2016

Why You May Want to Disable Location Services for Facebook

When news broke that Facebook was at least temporarily using users physical location to suggest real world connections, a strategy that has been employed by the NSA, the backlash was sharp.  It wasn't difficult to imagine scenarios when identities could be inadvertently and uncomfortably revealed through group therapy, 12-step meetings or secretive political movements. The world's most popular social network quickly said it would not continue what it called a small-scale test nor roll the feature on a wider scale in the future. But Facebook is still using your location data for other purposes, Fusion's Kashmir Hill reports: We do know that Facebook is using smartphone location for other things, such as tracking which stores you go to and geotargeting you with ads, but the social network now says it’s not using smartphone location to identify people you’ve been physically proximate to. Hill notes that using location to match users up, thus acting as a tool to reveal the identity of nearby strangers, might violate Facebook's agreement with the Federal Trade Commission . So you should expect that your location -- like everything you do on Facebook -- is being used to turn you into a better product for its advertisers. That's the cost of using a "free" site but you can limit your exposure a bit by turning off location services for Facebook on your phone. Here's very simple instructions for turning off location services on your Facebook and Facebook Messenger apps on your Android of iOS device. Do you mind if Facebook uses your location to suggest new friends? Let us know in the comments. [Image by Lwp Kommunikáció | Flickr]

June 30, 2016
twitter, changes

POLL: What Changes To Twitter Would You Like To See?

Little changes can make a difference. For instance, Twitter's decision to switch a star for a heart as its "Favorite" button increased use of the button by as much as 27.82 percent. And it's clear that despite Wall St. demanding that site grow faster and be easier for new users to grasp to have some hope of keeping up with competitors like Facebook and Snapchat, the site is still sweating the small stuff. Here are the four changes to the service announced this week: Replies: When replying to a Tweet, @names will no longer count toward the 140-character count. This will make having conversations on Twitter easier and more straightforward, no more penny-pinching your words to ensure they reach the whole group. Media attachments: When you add attachments like photos, GIFs, videos, polls, or Quote Tweets, that media will no longer count as characters within your Tweet. More room for words! Retweet and Quote Tweet yourself: We’ll be enabling the Retweet button on your own Tweets, so you can easily Retweet or Quote Tweet yourself when you want to share a new reflection or feel like a really good one went unnoticed. Goodbye, .@: These changes will help simplify the rules around Tweets that start with a username. New Tweets that begin with a username will reach all your followers. (That means you’ll no longer have to use the ”.@” convention, which people currently use to broadcast Tweets broadly.) If you want a reply to be seen by all your followers, you will be able to Retweet it to signal that you intend for it to be viewed more broadly. These tweaks are in line with Twitter's tradition of paying attention to how people use the site and make it easier for them to do what early adopters are already doing. That's how we got hashtags, retweet buttons and @ replies. Now you'll be able to tweet a bit longer messages, something people do now with screenshots of text, and have more public conversations, something people do now by putting a "." before someone's @username so their whole feed sees the conversation not just people who happen to follow you and the user you're conversing with. Cool. These are useful little nudges that will keep people who already love the site engaged -- even though they may have some ugly unforeseen consequences. But will they transform Twitter and spark a new wave of growth? Not likely. What would without alienating the hundreds of millions of loyal users? Tough question and we'd like to know what you think. [polldaddy poll=9429603] Cheers, Jason [Image by dominiccampbell | Flickr]

May 26, 2016